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  2. frenchpress

    Interview Chances

    Your friend certainly has a chance at an interview. At UBC a lower GPA is something that can be offset with a high NAQ, as the two are weighted equally pre-interview. Your friend should make sure to think outside the box when picking their ECs and try to list things that give a full picture of who they are — e.g. volunteering sure, but also hobbies, interests, work experience, etc. — and how those things have contributed to the qualities UBC says they’re looking for — community service, leadership, etc. I think UBC tends to care a lot more about that sort of thing than stuff like shadowing. You get your scores at the stage at which you’re rejected, so either at interview-invite stage or post-interview acceptance stage. You don’t get your scores if you’re accepted.
  3. frenchpress

    Someone HELP me

    I really liked the next steps practice tests. I used their full length exams as well as their CARS book. The CARS book was on the hard side, but the information on different strategies was helpful for me to figure out how to approach it. I would recommend that you start moving towards doing practice tests more regularly, and use those to guide your studying. Doing them under realistic timed conditions is also very helpful — e.g. dedicate your day to actually doing it with the breaks and timing as you would on the actual test day. This will help you develop time management skills, which are a key part of doing well on the exam. This is very good advice. Practice tests won’t help you much if you don’t take the time to review them afterwards — it could easily take you 2x-3x as long as it took you to write the test as it does to review it and really understand where you went wrong. A good system to consider might be something like: day 1, write a practice test and then maybe briefly review (but then give yourself a break to relax, you just wrote a test for like 6 hours!). Next 1-2 days, review in detail and pay careful attention to why you got questions wrong, and make notes about your weak concepts or areas in each category, bad habits in guessing, etc. Next 1-3 days, review weak areas a bit more generally and maybe do a few CARS passages for practice everyday. Then repeat. As you get closer to the exam you may be able to decrease the number of days between practice tests you as you hone in on the areas on which you need the most review.
  4. Today
  5. FA22raptero

    Interview Chances

    Also, just a side not as I am unfamiliar with the process, when does the University give you your scores for everything like your NAQ etc. etc.?
  6. Hi Folks, My friend is currently writing the MCAT's and has been working insanely hard for the past 9 months. Obviously, being a doctor is the dream of thousands here in Canada, and only a relative handful make it. With that said, I was wondering if you guys could maybe give me some insight into their chances of getting an interview at UBC. They will also be applying to Ontario schools. GPA: Converted GPA is hovering around 82%, so somewhat low. No science prerequisites, but this shouldn't matter for UBC. MCAT: Writing soon, but scoring in the 510+ range. I have faith that a good MCAT could yield a 513 or more... also slightly below average for admissions. CARS and Psych/Soce are 128+ and the other two are lower. Will certainly meet the minimums but that says little. Postgraduate: In their masters degree, received top honours in class and received the top prize for their final thesis. I have no idea how UBC might look at this, if it could compensate the undergrad GPA at all or if it will fall into the NAQ section. Will be published soon, but did not meet the deadline. Hopefully before interviews. NAQ: Hard to tell what it is when you consider that most people applying are probably some pretty type-A personalities, but it is strong. A lot of diversity and a lot of teamwork. Leadership with various charitable causes, including starting and running a couple clubs at school. Some really good work experience and has managed to work for a few doctors, also got to observe some surgical stuff. Was a tutor to other students, various other things as well. Anyways, obviously my friend isn't the most competitive candidate, but is very personable and super smart. If given a chance at an interview, I think their odds of admission go up way up. So what do you think their chances of getting an interview are? Are chances zero? I know there's a lot of negativity on this site, but I figure I'd hear what people had to say. If the news is good, I can share it with my friend. If people think odds are slim, I can help brace for impact and maybe take the advice and suggest ways to improve for next year. Thanks!
  7. I dont think the new limit it will make it or break it for anyone, this just puts pressure on people to think twice about the fluff that they put (I was guilty of that too). Formal education doesn't add much to your application... who cares where you went to high school or uni?
  8. Bawgg

    Days a week at QMed

    Hehe, sorry, I heard the curriculum was changing to allow for more personal time to explore more extracurriculars. Would anyone who's been accepted be able to give me an update? Thanks
  9. Unless I’m blind, there’s not even a formal education category! If we look at the omsas guide it’s not even there :o. Back to the drawing board lads!
  10. heyhellohi

    Someone HELP me

    Taking time to reflect on your practice tests is almost as important as actually doing the test. Reflecting on the questions you got right, got wrong, got right by guessing, got right in a 50/50 situation, etc. are all important. If I were you, moving forward, I would start to analyze all questions in a test after writing the test. This will show you answering habits, etc. You can even do this for tests you've already done. Lastly, since you've identified CARS as your biggest weakness: put a larger emphasis on it for the remainder of studying time. Don't stop studying the other sections, though - just do more CARS and find a strategy that works for you.
  11. Executive-D

    Change in # of sketch entries?

    hmm that's interesting... I just checked and I had 41 entries in my application, although 3 were "formal education" and 4 were "other" (which I used for certifications). If this limit was in place, I would have had some tough decisions for what to cut. Yikes.
  12. I was under this impression too. However, when I contacted RBC and asked them about it, they said that they waive all credit card and banking fees through residency as well (and the two year grace period) because "RBC considers residency as part of school". If you're in the GTA area, PM me and I'll let you know the name of the RBC specialist I was in contact with (they reassured me about the fees being waived, and offered every other standard perk for med students).
  13. mitmtl

    Selling 2 AAMC Practice tests (1 & 2)

    interested also, willing to split cost!
  14. When you go to your application go straight to the place you fill out your sketch. It’s in the header! Also, even though it kinda benefits me, I wholeheartedly agree that this is a disadvantage towards those with amazing life experiences. Hope this won’t make or break them :/
  15. friedchickendudeMD

    White coat ceremony

    Do you happen to know the time aswell? I really appreciate this!
  16. InternistInTraining

    Change in # of sketch entries?

    ive just looked at the omsas guide and I cant see where it says 32 items. Did they remove it or is it somewhere else?
  17. DrPharaoh

    Chance me PLEASE!

    Thank you for the advice, @Potentiate !
  18. InternistInTraining

    Change in # of sketch entries?

    what?? thats insane! where does it say that? why would they do that? it definitely hurts more mature students who have done alot in their lives. how can someone who has more than 32 things overcome this though? Do you think we can combine activities together to make up for lost space?
  19. AlynHoffman

    Change in # of sketch entries?

    I was just about to make a post asking about this too, I haven't heard anything about the number of entries changing so this was a surprise :| I'm hoping it's just a typo haha
  20. bananabread1212

    Someone HELP me

    True, i think i really need to spend some time reflecting
  21. bananabread1212

    Someone HELP me

    This is actually my second aamc test. I got 126/124/125/129 on my first one. Do u have any god suggestions regarding the material i should be using to practice cars? Ive done all the aamc cars packages and did a lot of EK and TPR.
  22. helicase

    Someone HELP me

    This so much. A big part of MCAT studying is constantly reflecting on why you're performing the way you're performing and then going back to tackle your weak spots. There's no 'one size fits all' approach to improvement.
  23. Yes, I saw that too.
  24. Hey all, On the OMSAS app under sketch it says "Provide biographical information about yourself and outline your activities since age 16 (maximum 32 entries)". This is my first time applying but wasn't it 48 or something last year?
  25. NBgeegee17

    White coat ceremony

    I can look at your 1st year schedule online! You should get your login information soon!
  26. I did not use near that much. Everything I wanted to say was said in 200-300 characters, which you have to do anyways for the other applications. But it's there to use if you need it, if you don't have the time to refine and cut down to be more succinct, or if you really do have that much to say
  27. Hi healthcaregs, [admins please delete if not allowed] In Ontario, I personally know many PAs that have worked at the same job/employer since graduation (myself included). This is a combination of PAs who are privately hired by a solo / group of physicians, and by those who are hired thru hospitals. Not all PAs stay in the same job forever: Other PAs have changed jobs due to things not working out with the Career Start employer (whether it was a poor employer fit, poor employee fit, operational reasons, etc.)Change in location/life circumstances, wanting to change specialties/schedules. Some PAs have switched jobs after 1-2 years but stayed in the same hospital (e.g. one PA I know of switched departments e.g. Internal Medicine to ER, but continued to work in the same hospital). If you don't have flexibility on geographic location and/or specialty you want to practice, this may limit some of your job opportunities. With that being said there are a few opportunities in the GTA for example, but those PA jobs tend to be more competitive (not unlike jobs by our health care provider colleague counterparts i.e. nursing/physio/physicians etc.) However from my personal conversations with grads from last year, most if not all were able to obtain meaningful employment within a few months - even in circumstances where things may not have worked out in the first job they applied to. In order to address this question further, I interviewed 4 new PA grads: two who obtained work through Career Start, and two who found employment outside of Career Start: HOW IS THE CANADIAN PA JOB MARKET? New grad Sara Finding a Job as a New PA graduate Part 1: Getting Started with the Career Start Grant Finding a Job as a New PA Graduate Part 2: The Importance of Having a Network Andrew - New PA Grad Andrew reflects on the PA Job Hunt BG - New PA Grad BG discusses finding work thru Career Start Celina - New PA Grad Celina on finding work outside the Career Start Grant Guide to the 2017 Ontario Career Start Grant Networking and Employment Tips for PA Students Where to Find PA Jobs in Canada Interview with the Ontario PA Chapter President There is a Canadian Pre-PA Student Networking Group on FB - and every few weeks we get a question about the PA job market (specifically in Ontario). There's a few nuances about the job market (which isn't perfect) that I think would be worth your time to read. In fact if you type in "job market" in the group's search function you'll find past posts with opinions and insights from PA students, and practicing PAs which I feel is much more balanced and considers much more variables than the 2016 post you are referring to. Other resources you can look into: Attend the PA Information sessions in the fall, and ask the programs directly in the Q&A session Speak with current practicing PAs, contact admin@capa-acam.ca if you are interested in being connected with one. Consider emailing the Canadian Association of Physician Assistants admin@capa-acam.ca I've attached a screenshot of one of two comments I left on our most recent question about PAs in that FB group:
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