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U Of T Pa Applicants 2017


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#1 danijaq

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 01:59 PM

A thread for current applicants to ask each other questions/discuss the process!

#2 shaheenr

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 03:43 PM

Hi. My name is Shaheen and I applied to both the UFT and McMaster BScPA programs. I have also applied to 2nd Entry Nursing BScRN at Western, Queens', UFT and York.

I am currently a 3rd year Kinesiology student at York. My intentions are to get into medical school but I decided to take a clinical and a practical route instead of your usual BSc with barely any professional clinical experience.

My current cGPA is not even that high (3.2-3.3). I have my hours for U of T's PA and I am waiting for McMasters' supp application. I wanted to know the chances of me getting in and what route works best for me to get into medical school in Canada/USA.

1. PA (UFT/McMaster) --> Work --> Med

2. Nursing (UFT/Western/Queens/York) --> Work --> Med (if no acceptance, pursue NP then apply)

3. Complete BSc in Kinesiology at York --> Med (if no acceptance, then proceed to plan 4)

4. Complete BSc in Kinesiology at York --> BScPA in Buffalo/Detroit --> Work --> Med



So, which plan do you guys think works the best for me. Thank you very much for your responses.

#3 danijaq

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 03:48 AM

Personally, I think it would be sort of a waste of your time and the PA school's resources to become a PA with no intention of being one. If your goal is to get into medical school, it would be best to take the traditional route by finishing your BSc, maybe moving onto a masters if option #3 doesn't work out, where you can still gain clinical experience. It is definitely possible to have emense clinical experience while completing a BSc, it would just require extra accommodation and work not provided by the institution. It seems as though you're holding back on applying to med school right now because of your lower GPA (correct me if I'm wrong by assuming this) and if your plan is to boost your GPA through PA or RN, I don't think those strategies will work. If you really think you could pull up your GPA, you could take the risk of doing a masters and just working your butt off to get a competitive GPA, while still adding to your resume. However, I caution this route as well since getting into medical school is pretty much the least amount of hard work you'll have to do because once you're in, the difficulty sky-rockets: Basicially, if you can barely make it in, you're likely not to be successful or satisfied once you're studying medicine.

With regards to option #4, PA school in the states if you're Canadian is incredibly expensive and if you're hoping to go to medical school, I think you'll find yourself overwhelmed, money-wise. However if money is no issue for you, then above all consider the fact that PA school is not meant to be a stepping stone before medical school. There are people who are incredibly passionate and dedicated to the PA profession, especially in Ontario where they accept so few students. Using PA school to get into med school can take away opportunities from those who actually dream of being a PA.

Your plans on the whole seem all over the place and not clear of what your actual intentions are. I would suggest getting some first hand experiences about what of each of you career options is like (NP, PA, MD, RN etc.) and make your choice based on what best fits with your skills and desires in life and you may find that medicine is not the best option for you, as it's not for many. PA can actually be a great alternative for those who are passionate about medicine but maybe want a better work-life balance or don't want to spend 4 years of medical school (+residency) stressed out and not starting a family. Look into all the options closely, specifically at the path as opposed to just the outcome.

Regarding your question about GPA and PA: Although there is no set GPA required to be accepted to PA (other than the minmum), it was circulating on last years forums that the average accepted GPA for McMaster was high: around a 3.8 I believe? (Someone correct me if I'm wrong here). The average acceptance GPA for U of T tends to be a bit lower due to the lesser amount of young, academic student's who apply (because they lack the hours) and because there is a greater focus on the quality of clinical experience. I'd say with your GPA that you're likely to have a good shot at U of T if your clinical experience is fairly primary/direct and if your personal statements are good. That isn't to say you have no shot for McMaster, you'd just need to have excellent "others": experience, answers to the supplemental questions etc.

Hope I was able to help! PM me if you have any more questions.
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#4 relaxingbath

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 01:06 PM

I'm currently a 2nd year UofT PA student so if you have any question on the application process, the program or the clinical year feel free to post here or send me a message.



#5 MS94

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 09:34 PM

Hi relaxingbath,

 

Could you suggest resources (books, websites, other material) to prepare for U of T MMI .

 

Also, can you provide some details about the Longitudinal Clinical Experience component of the first year . Is it a kind of preceptorship, shadowing ? Are the clinical sites provided by the Program or students have to arrange those ?

It says that the students should spend half day per week on the clinical site, means they need to be in Toronto area, then how would that fit in the first year online spectrum ?? If you can give some details about this, that is much appreciated.



#6 relaxingbath

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 02:08 AM

Here are some resources 

https://anneccpa.wordpress.com/ 

http://michener.ca/admissions/applying/full-time-admission/multiple-mini-interviews-mmi/ and finally 

http://mdprogram.mcmaster.ca/md-program-admissions/how-we-select/multiple-mini-interview-(mmi) .

They give an overview of how the MMIs are carried out and what kind of "general" things they are looking for. 

 

The LCEs are arranged my the students themselves that being said there is a master list given out of where previous students have done LCEs with some feed back on what to expect (you can choose to use this list or find your own). They can vary from being shadowing where you don't have any hands on patient interactions to getting to carry out procedures and involved participation. 

 

LCEs are carried out in your home location though there is a great experience at the Toronto pathology department at Humber hospital - some years have arranged to stay an extra day after residential blocks to do this. The residential blocks are the only times where you have to be in Toronto the rest of first year is online in your home location. 

 

Hope this clarification has helped. Don't hesitate to ask any further questions.



#7 MS94

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 03:14 AM

Your input is a great help relaxingbath and cleared the picture of LCEs to the most. It would be more vivid as you start the program.

 

Thank you very much !!!






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