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Do You Regret Doing Medicine Over Dentistry?


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#21 #YOLO

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 04:25 AM

Yup. the "passionate" people are the annoying, in your face crazy ones. incredibly hard to work with. a lot of it is self serving and ego boosting for themselves. 



#22 Cain

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 01:10 PM

im not handy so ive never considered dentistry.

 

they both have their levels of suck but i think the way things are going today dentistry has an edge because of its distance from centralized medicare.

 

medicine has residency, which is bs. lots of specialties have shit job markets like surgery and pathology. so your options are to move to the middle of nowhere or do continuous fellowships or be unemployed. i know people in those fields who are in each of those situations, either living in places they hate, doing another fellowship, or doing nothing because they have to stay in a city for spouses work or personal preference. med has got more prestige compared to dent depending on what field you go into. surgery, sure. radiology, your peers do even if its envy. family med, nope unless youre the small town country doc. pathology, hells no youre a lab monkey told when to jump by your admin superiors and some shithead surgeons. if you do go into a specialty with a good job market, particularly in primary care, you wont make much living in a nice city but youll sure work for it, though that might be true for all fields though most would pay better than family.

 

dent is four (3?) years and youre out working which is nice. job markets in big cities are awful though. if you can stomach really isolated communities and have a good business mind, you can make retirement-level money a few years in and be done before youre 35. im not exaggerating. meanwhile doctors at that age are on Q4 call pulling things out of asses all the live long day for less than minimum wage. if you want to specialize in dent you have to pay tuition and the competition for things like ortho is fierce. omfs requires a medical degree too but those guys are making a killing, like seven figs annually with bankers hours, in big cities. id say omfs might be the best deal in healthcare.



#23 malkynn

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:31 PM

I applied to both, but preferred dentistry.
I don't have the personality for medicine. I'm utterly shit at respecting hierarchy and compulsively challenge bullies and staunchly defend the little guy. I barely made it through dental school without some faculty wanting my head. There are some who still won't make eye contact with me to this day. Lol.

I LOVE working with my hands (I've been handy since I was 4 and started taking apart the home phone), i love working more independently, am very comfortable with small business, and really like gross shit. It's so cathartic getting rid of disgusting stuff. Pulling rotted stumps out of someone's jaw is deeply satisfying.

Dentistry is, infortunately, extremely limited. It opens very few doors and slams all others shut.
Med opens up a lot more doors, there are so many careers within the realm of medicine or medicine adjacent. I hear what some of my classmates from McGill med are planning on doing and it's not some huge challenge for them if they don't want to primarily work clinically.

Trying to do some kind of alternative to clinical work in dentistry is very difficult and the opportunities are out there, but they are rare.

In a job where getting injured is easy and where it will bankrupt you...it's daunting having a lot of closed doors around you. In the early years minor injuries like a sprained finger or a scratched cornea could be financially devastating.

I'm so very happy I chose not to go into medicine. If I were to go back and choose something other than dentistry, I would have chosen a completely different career, not a different medical specialty.

I love my job because I'm doing it exactly the way I want to, but I would despise 9/10 jobs available to me right now, and that makes me nervous.

I'm extremely spoiled in my position, which is great, but as I said, makes me nervous. I like back up plans.
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#24 PremedMD

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:59 PM

What do Med students and Dent students have in common?

They both applied to Med School.  :lol:


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#25 MT_93

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 10:56 AM

Thank you all for the input fellas! I really appreciate the amount of time you took to write out how you feel, I'm definitely getting a better list of pros and cons of each career as I go... that's if the choice does have to be made by me  :P


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#26 1994

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 06:05 PM

Would any surgical residents/staff or others with longer training times who were once interested in dentistry mind chiming in? Conversely, can any current dental students/dentists who were once interested in surgery comment? Procedural work is one of the main factors that pulls me to medicine and dentistry; however, I am having trouble weighing other factors such as scope of practice, lifestyle (length of training), etc.

 

Thanks and feel free to PM me if preferred.


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#27 malkynn

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 09:28 PM

Would any surgical residents/staff or others with longer training times who were once interested in dentistry mind chiming in? Conversely, can any current dental students/dentists who were once interested in surgery comment? Procedural work is one of the main factors that pulls me to medicine and dentistry; however, I am having trouble weighing other factors such as scope of practice, lifestyle (length of training), etc.

Thanks and feel free to PM me if preferred.


When I was young and had energy and was convinced that my "dreams were worth it" no matter what "it" was, I was interested in surgery.

That's how I ended up in dentistry.

I did a lot of research and found out exactly what the competition and process of surgery entailed and I thankfully dropped that goal. It really wasn't for me.

I'm a bit of a diva and not so into sacrifice, so surgery was not a good fit. Dentistry is perfect for me that way, I get to work exactly the way I want to, in the city I want to work, and only the hours I want to work.
I'm a big fan of living my life exactly the way I want to and the older I get, the less I'm willing to sacrifice. I'm good with the level of challenge, I don't need bigger badder meaner cases to feel satisfied with my work.

Be honest with yourself about what you need to be happy.
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#28 Mithril

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 02:43 AM

My brother is a dentist. He regrets his choice going into dentistry rather than medicine and he's been practicing for 8 years now.

 

I am a family resident. I love my job and what I do. I have a general knowledge of every field and dealt with an acute hypoglycemic episode on a plane last spring. I may not have been able to do that as a dentist. I've never had any interest in dentistry.


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#29 Bambi

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:48 PM

I love medicine, I'm in a surgical specialty, so 5 + 2 residency & fellowship, it is grueling but well worth it. You need to love what you do to be fulfilled. Dentistry was on my radar as a Plan B, but I got in on my first attempt. The debt will take care of itself in time, and to have a life, you need to be organized and plan breaks way in advance, all is doable. Work hard, play hard, I seek out challenges professionally and personally, so on breaks, I go for challenging, exciting sports.

Matching at CaRMS involves planning and luck! I don't see undergrad research helping really. In 3 weeks, during part of a summer during med school, I did a literature review that was published but it was irrelevant for matching. I had completed 1 week of an elective when I applied to this specialty, the attending and resident liked working with me, I was enthusiastic, a hard worker and easy to get along with. These attributes got me to the interview and an acceptance. I had not considered this field 2 weeks before the CaRMS application deadline, so it was circumstances and luck that led me to apply and to acceptance. I wouldn't change any part of my life if I could. I have another 5 years until private practice and am enjoying this stage of my life, notwithstanding the apparent hardships. Sure, others my age are established, earning a ton of money and didn't have all the years of studying. But I would not enjoy doing what they are doing, so our lives are not comparable. I am on track, enjoying, constantly learning and have no regrets.
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#30 amichel

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:00 PM

My brother is a dentist. He regrets his choice going into dentistry rather than medicine and he's been practicing for 8 years now.

I am a family resident. I love my job and what I do. I have a general knowledge of every field and dealt with an acute hypoglycemic episode on a plane last spring. I may not have been able to do that as a dentist. I've never had any interest in dentistry.


Not that I'm disagreeing with you but I think you could probably deal with that one as a plumber. :P Assuming you knew they were diabetic I guess.
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#31 MT_93

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:05 PM

Not that I'm disagreeing with you but I think you could probably deal with that one as a plumber. :P Assuming you knew they were diabetic I guess.

 

LOOOOL 


2016/2017: Applied: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UofT (DDS), UWO (DDS)

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#32 MT_93

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:06 PM

Thank you guys for the additional input. Fingers crossed for UofC Med!


2016/2017: Applied: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UofT (DDS), UWO (DDS)

                   Interviews: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UWO (DDS)

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#33 Mithril

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:35 AM

Not that I'm disagreeing with you but I think you could probably deal with that one as a plumber. :P Assuming you knew they were diabetic I guess.

I didn't know beforehand. I just went through my top differentials of why someone passes out all of a sudden. Could've been a lot of things.


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#34 amichel

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:19 AM

I didn't know beforehand. I just went through my top differentials of why someone passes out all of a sudden. Could've been a lot of things.


Well that's awesome then. :)

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#35 NLengr

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:26 AM

A good first move when you have an unexpected pass out/unresponsive patient is check a blood glucose.
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#36 Mithril

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 06:32 AM

Very true.


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#37 Welder

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:24 PM

I'm glad to be in medicine and as Mithril said, to have a general knowledge of every health field, even as a surgical resident versus a dentist.

 

I don't care much about the lenght of training and I couldn't be less bothered by the total income at the end of the line between a dentist or a physician. 



#38 malkynn

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 11:00 AM

I'm glad to be in medicine and as Mithril said, to have a general knowledge of every health field, even as a surgical resident versus a dentist.
.


Yep. This is important.
I had to do the entire preclinical McGill med program, so 18 months of med school. I was sooooo bored. So bored. Unbelievably bored.

It was so much information about so many systems and I didn't care about any of them beyond a general interest. I so don't care about the embryonic development of the bladder. I just don't.

So yeah, if you are the kind of person who wants to know so much about so much and would feel limited by dentistry, then med is the better choice.

Meanwhile, I'm the kind of person who isn't satisfied just learning to do fillings, i am constantly investing in expensive courses to be able to do fillings even better. I don't do courses on learning new procedures, I just keep obsessing about perfecting the things I already know.

It's very different personalities that will like those two different styles of learning. It's important to identify early.
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