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Ireland 2017 Acceptances


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#1 Ireland123

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:09 PM

Just wondering if anyone else has been accepted to Cork or Dublin. I'm Canadian and received an acceptance yesterday to Cork for the advanced standing 4-year program. 

 

 

Couple questions:

 

1) Does anyone have any information regarding the accreditation supposedly happening this year

2) Is one able to specialize and apply to a program in Canada or the States if they completed an international accredited Dental Degree

 

 



#2 DentHope2021

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:48 PM

I applied last year and got accepted to the program as well. I decided against going for a few reasons but mainly since it would be tougher to specialize in Canada and the States doesn't consider it equivalent. I think it's better to apply in Canada multiple times than jumping ship abroad if you can bring up your DAT score and have a good GPA. In regards to the accreditation I think someone mentioned that it will get renewed and there shouldn't be any issues for future grads enrolled or planning to enroll this year.

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#3 Jcro+

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 05:41 AM

I applied last year and got accepted to the program as well. I decided against going for a few reasons but mainly since it would be tougher to specialize in Canada and the States doesn't consider it equivalent. I think it's better to apply in Canada multiple times than jumping ship abroad if you can bring up your DAT score and have a good GPA. In regards to the accreditation I think someone mentioned that it will get renewed and there shouldn't be any issues for future grads enrolled or planning to enroll this year.

Not sure if it's tougher to specialize in Canada just because you go to Ireland.

 

But I think it's better to look at your own core values: If you don't want to specialize, then go abroad since you can always come back to practice here. I personally think it's better than wasting 2-3 years reapplying since you lose 2-3 years of your life and income and at the end of the day you are still a dentist. Plus, no patient is ever going to ask where you went to dental school.


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#4 Dr Pepper

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:35 PM

Not true...I get asked where I went to school and where I am from quite frequently ...haha
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The University of Western Ontario

#5 1997

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 11:20 PM

Not sure if it's tougher to specialize in Canada just because you go to Ireland.

 

But I think it's better to look at your own core values: If you don't want to specialize, then go abroad since you can always come back to practice here. I personally think it's better than wasting 2-3 years reapplying since you lose 2-3 years of your life and income and at the end of the day you are still a dentist. Plus, no patient is ever going to ask where you went to dental school.

 

I always look at where my dentist graduated from.. just saying haha



#6 kl88

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 11:31 PM

No disrespect, but I don't like the fact that Canadian dentists (who know they will practice in Canada) taking the easy way out by going abroad, whether that be takig advantage of their citizenships, the lower requirement for these schools, their money available to fund these...

If you are going to practice in Canada, go to a Canadian dental school like the rest of us

#7 Done

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 11:48 PM

If you don't want to specialize best you go to Ireland and get out early to work. Stigma, but so what....

#8 Waves

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 04:49 AM

No disrespect, but I don't like the fact that Canadian dentists (who know they will practice in Canada) taking the easy way out by going abroad, whether that be takig advantage of their citizenships, the lower requirement for these schools, their money available to fund these...

If you are going to practice in Canada, go to a Canadian dental school like the rest of us

 

But what if your stats aren't high enough to get into Canadian dental schools? Of course the majority of Canadians would want to practice in Canada. Would you just tell them to not pursue a career in dentistry then? 


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#9 MT_93

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 09:07 AM

No disrespect, but I don't like the fact that Canadian dentists (who know they will practice in Canada) taking the easy way out by going abroad, whether that be takig advantage of their citizenships, the lower requirement for these schools, their money available to fund these...

If you are going to practice in Canada, go to a Canadian dental school like the rest of us

 

I wouldn't say it's "the easy way out". It's more like a different path with different life obstacles. There simply isn't even enough seats in Canadian dental schools, and US schools are too expensive. So when someone goes abroad, it's usually because it's much cheaper than the US since you'll usually need a decent GPA anyway.

 

 

That being said, the cost and stress of moving alone to a different country away from your friends is barely "the easy way out". These programs are often even more intense than North American dental schools since their high school is usually harder as well. I personally think the easy way out is realizing early on how to improve your GPA, at home in Canada,  before its too late, permanently ruining your GPA, if say one doesn't start getting a high GPA till 3rd year instead of 2nd given 1st year is usually a write-off. This way, you aren't forced to go abroad; I've yet to hear of a 3.9 24DAT Canadian choosing to go abroad over Canada.

 

True it's all about the hard work,  but the only difference is when you put in the hard work. Undergrad and DAT to get in? OR moving to another country, writing equivalency exams, and struggling to make the important network Canadian dental students already made. 

 

 

550 applicants, ~35 accepted each year with at least 120 more than qualified to succeed in a Canadian dental program. But shouldn't those top applicants all have the opportunity when the only thing holding them back is a 3.75 vs a 3.85. Most dental students are happy with 50-65% JUST TO PASS. I wonder what those 3.9's GPA's would be in dental school....


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2016/2017: Applied: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UofT (DDS), UWO (DDS)

                   Interviews: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UWO (DDS)

                   Waitlisted: UWO (DDS)

                   Accepted: UofA (DDS)

 

UofA DDS Class of 2021!


#10 Jcro+

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:12 AM

No disrespect, but I don't like the fact that Canadian dentists (who know they will practice in Canada) taking the easy way out by going abroad, whether that be takig advantage of their citizenships, the lower requirement for these schools, their money available to fund these...

If you are going to practice in Canada, go to a Canadian dental school like the rest of us

 

So are you saying American dental schools are inferior to Canadian dental schools?

 

And I don't think there is an "easy way" out. If you go abroad to Ireland, Australia, UK or wherever, you still have to overcome the same obstacles coming back to practice in Canada. That being said, I would rather go to an American dental school if I had an option...



#11 unkn0wnfutur3

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 01:29 PM

You can't deny it's not an "easy" way out, at least to some extent, and in some way. Despite the fact there are still some challenges and obstacles, most people decide to study abroad paying extra $$ because it's more likely for them to be accepted with lower stats. It's an "easy" way out that is often deemed unfair because not everyone can afford to do so.

And it's not that schools abroad is "inferior", but they are basically accepting you because you're literally paying a shit ton for your degree as an international student. At many institutes, at many degree of education, stats for international students are lower often for this very reason



#12 cookiemonster99

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:55 PM

You can't deny it's not an "easy" way out, at least to some extent, and in some way. Despite the fact there are still some challenges and obstacles, most people decide to study abroad paying extra $$ because it's more likely for them to be accepted with lower stats. It's an "easy" way out that is often deemed unfair because not everyone can afford to do so.

And it's not that schools abroad is "inferior", but they are basically accepting you because you're literally paying a shit ton for your degree as an international student. At many institutes, at many degree of education, stats for international students are lower often for this very reason

 

 

I gonna put my 2 cents in here

 

there's obviously a stigma to people going abroad to getting their degrees 

whether you think it's the "easy" way out or whatever 

 

If you get in a Canadian school then obviously go to a Canadian school. Nothing wrong with that.

 

If you can't get into a Canadian school given that you have good stats and you have the means of going somewhere else then why not take that opportunity and go somewhere to do your degree? Is it unfair to people that can't afford it? yes..... but that's just life. Life isn't fair...deal with it

 

If you look at it this way, if you don't get into a Canadian school after 3 years of applying it's discouraging! That's 3 years of wasted potential income you could've made if you went somewhere else like the US or Ireland or Australia. I don't know about you but I don't want to waste my 20s or 30s in school as well.....

 

And let me just say this:

for those of you that have the stigma that just because your dentist didn't graduate or get into a Canadian school and you think that they are inferior for whatever reason I strongly urge you to think about what you are saying. 

 

Just because someone went abroad to the US, ireland, Australia, doesn't mean they aren't just as good as any Canadian grads. At the end of the day, it's what you make out of your degree. The dentistry dean from western is from India from memory....just saying. 


Edited by cookiemonster99, 20 March 2017 - 10:03 PM.

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#13 MT_93

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:47 PM

It's also worth noting that many people who go can't afford it either and instead take out a line of credit putting themselves in quite a bit of debt. 


2016/2017: Applied: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UofT (DDS), UWO (DDS)

                   Interviews: UofC (MD), UofA (DDS), UWO (DDS)

                   Waitlisted: UWO (DDS)

                   Accepted: UofA (DDS)

 

UofA DDS Class of 2021!


#14 aspiringdentist10

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:13 PM

I also applied to Ireland but I haven't heard anything yet and I was just wondering if you got your acceptance through the mail or an email?



#15 LFC73

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 03:23 AM

I also applied to Ireland but I haven't heard anything yet and I was just wondering if you got your acceptance through the mail or an email?

 

I got my UCC acceptance via email last week, make sure you check your junk folder!



#16 Jcro+

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 04:08 PM

You can't deny it's not an "easy" way out, at least to some extent, and in some way. Despite the fact there are still some challenges and obstacles, most people decide to study abroad paying extra $$ because it's more likely for them to be accepted with lower stats. It's an "easy" way out that is often deemed unfair because not everyone can afford to do so.

And it's not that schools abroad is "inferior", but they are basically accepting you because you're literally paying a shit ton for your degree as an international student. At many institutes, at many degree of education, stats for international students are lower often for this very reason

 

I think you are misinformed. Canadian schools are cheap because most of the tuition fees are subsidized by the government. In most American, irish or other countries, the tuition fees are not subsidized. So they aren't paying more to "get in", it's just the tuition is not subsidized.






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