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  1. 9 points
    newmy88

    Invite Countdown

    Hey! I completely agree with your statement 100% and not looking to ruffle your feathers However, coming on here and engaging with others who are going through a lot of the same struggles as me is actually quite comforting and what keeps me going. My family and friends irl don’t really understand what it’s like, so knowing there’s a community out there that gets it is really important to me. So although we don’t want to help the neuroticism flourish, I also wouldn’t want people to take a step back from support they can’t get elsewhere, or feel ashamed from seeking it here, and I’d rather them express how they’re feeling to feel a little less alone
  2. 9 points
    Not familiar with the politics of things, but this is obviously not a real plan. The article doesn't even make sense, how can they open up a medical school that fast? This is clearly a classic example of promising the world, without actually understanding how things work. Political showmanship with zero substance.
  3. 8 points
    TackleMD

    Invite Countdown

    Think its tomorrow. 2019 oct 18th, friday - 3rd week of oct (end of the week) . 2018 oct 18th , thursday - 3rd week of oct (end of the week) This year oct 18th is a sunday and the 4th week. 19th is monday but the 4th week (Beginning of the week). Tomorrow - 16th, friday- 3rd week of oct (end of the week) I'm neurotic.. I know. lol
  4. 7 points
    gogogo

    Medicine...

    Hey, I would love to be wrong about this, because I could've pursed another career after my previous degree, made low six figures without any school debt, and called it a day. Instead, I chose med because of many reasons, one of which is that I thought it would be financially smarter. Too bad I only realized what I wrote in the other post once I got into med school.... But tell me, how am I underplaying it? I showed how the net worth is essentially equal for both careers with very simple math. The "double increase" that FM is making is simply compensation for the head-start that the PA (or any other reasonably earning professional) started making years earlier without any debt. The extra $65,000 dollars that the FM is making per year is money that the PA has already accumulated and the FM is just playing catch up. By the way, this reasoning also applies to FM vs. other higher-earning specialties. For instance, let's say I start med at 27, and then I can choose between FM (250k/year for 33 years) vs. a surgical specialty (450k for 30 years; it's 30 years because I spent 3 extra years in residency, and that's a conservative estimate). The surgery specialty pulls ahead at 38...by $78,000, which isn't that much to me. I'd consider several hundreds of thousands of dollars to be approaching a significant difference in net worth. When does that happen? At 41-42, where the surgical specialty has ~400k more than FM. At 48, the surgical specialty is 1 million dollars ahead. But seriously, what's so great about 1 million dollars extra when you've nearly hit 50? Especially given that surgery has a much more stressful lifestyle that involves trading away every other aspect of your life. Is your freedom and last remaining youth worth trading for 1 million dollars at 50? So while the 450k salary sounds amazing vs. the "low-paying" 250k of FM, it only shows itself once I hit my 40s-50s. That's not a great trade to me. You're right though, with the right investments, FM could pull ahead. But do you really want to justify this difficult path based on speculations regarding the stock market? The prospect of 5.5 million dollars that I can "cash in" when I'm 60 isn't that appealing. Any day of the week, I'd trade the potential/speculative 3 million dollars at 60 for a more normal youth that wasn't so high-stress and hell-bent on being academically exceptional. What I want to stress to premeds and potential career-switchers is that you should make sure you're going into med for the right reasons. Going into it because you think it'll elevate your life beyond what you have (as long as you're in a decent place right now) is an illusion. Don't underestimate the precious value of youth, lower stress, freedom, etc. One day you'll wake up and wonder where it all went. I'm not old by any means, but now that I'm seeing my 20s come to an end, I reflect on the fact that I've spent the last two decades in school, and will do so for the next several years. If I live to my early 70s, I'll have spent nearly half of my life in school/training. This is time I will never get back and time that was full of unnecessary striving. I often envy my friends/family who took a much more normal path. Sure, I might drive a slightly nicer car, have a somewhat nicer house, be able to eat at nicer restaurants, etc. but none of those things can compensate for lost youth and the high stress that I will carry with me for my adult years as a physician. Freedom, lack of stress, time for family, a calm mind...these are the luxuries of life, not a car or house just to show off to others. I look at my classmates in their early 20s and I think that they, like me until very recently, don't realize that we're on a hamster wheel and that this never-ending race doesn't end until we decide that it ends. We imagine that once we become staff, then we'll have reached the promised land. But, I look at the staff and so many of them are burnt out, lacking relationships with their kids, and it's tragic, because they lost their one chance at a normal life. It's not all doom and gloom, of course, many staff are happy. But I just want to emphasize to any one younger than me in this thread that it's not all about making 250k+. Like blah1234 said, many of my lower-earning friends are living great lives. I have one friend who only did college and has worked since high school. He just bought a house in a desirable GTA suburb, is living with his fiance, has a 9-4 schedule, and will soon be buying a rental property to make extra income. He's achieved this by making between 40k-70k since high school and saving diligently, and with his girlfriend making 70k, them having no debt, they are in a great place. This is already a terribly long post, so I'll end with something more positive. We are very lucky in medicine to make the money that we do with the stability that we have and the impact we can have on people. I don't want to come off as if I'm complaining about making an income that puts me in the 1%. Just recognize that there is more to life than making an amazing salary, and that being "average" is perfectly okay and more desirable in many ways.
  5. 7 points
    greysweater

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    Coming from someone who was on a waitlist for almost a whole summer along with @newmy88 here and documented that journey almost every day, I personally also found these forums to be very supportive and helped ease some burden of the anxiety of waiting. A con is they can definitely be neurotic and I won't deny that. But I feel as though they are use at your own risk. Some people will be happier checking every day to give themselves a sense of control, others will be happier going about their normal business and just putting it out of sight out of mind. Either is fine in my opinion.
  6. 7 points
    offmychestplease

    Medicine...

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts and analysis. I want to concede that you really made me look at things from a different perspective. I came into medicine without any real job prospects from my BSc like many people and so medicine was a HUGE surge...anything above a min wage job would have been a better investment/life lol which is why I so strongly recommended OP to pursue this path...but really if you are someone already making good money at a young age, and like your job it doesn't seem like the best move always..
  7. 6 points
    1029384756md

    Medicine...

    Chiming in as a FM staff who started med school at 21yo... what's with all the woe is me med school ruined my 20's posts? While my friends were either stuck in low-paying jobs with poor prospects or aging x10 in corporate, I got to live like a student for another 6 years and enjoyed all the good stuff that came with being a student. If I stopped aging I'd probably stay in school forever. Life is good now with more money but you know what I really miss? Playing some street ball and chilling over beer afterwards, back when we were all broke AF and couldn't afford to play golf or go on trips. Now we're all loaded with staff cash but no one has the time or energy to play pick up anymore. For those in their early 20's, staying in school with a solid high paying job at the end is a solid path to take. Lost income due to school? You'll make it back fast if you really want. To the OP, don't switch if money is the main reason. If you enjoy learning and want a degree that opens up a whole new world of opportunities, then go for it!
  8. 6 points
    gogogo

    Medicine...

    From a purely economic perspective, it depends on how old you are, how much you expect to make as a family physician, your salary as a PA, and the expected value of your PA benefits + pension. I'll make a few assumptions to show you the math, but you can change them for a more accurate outlook. This message looks long, but it's pretty straightforward, so I encourage you to read it to the end. But for a quick spoiler: Probably not worth it. My assumptions: Age: 25 FM Ontario average income: $250,000 post-overhead = $150,000 after income tax PA salary: $120,000 = 84,000 after income tax Value of PA benefits = $2,000 per year Value of PA pension: $84,000 x 50% x 25 years (this assumes that your pension will pay half of your post-tax salary for 25 years of retirement) = $1,050,000 Now let's chart your net worth's trajectory, starting with PA, where you earn $84,000/year + $2,000 in benefits/year: $86,000 Age 25: $86,000; 26: $172,000; 27: $258,000; ...You get the point, so I'll skip ahead to age 39 ($258,000 + $86,000 x 12 years): 39: $1,290,000 I stopped at 39 because it's the first year that your net worth as a FM would be greater than your net worth as a PA. But we should also look at how much it's greater: $10,000 (i.e., FM net worth = $1,300,000 at age 39). I am also assuming that you made zero investments as a PA (e.g., stocks that appreciate in value), that you have zero savings right now (that would only make your net worth as a PA look better), that there is no interest on your med school debt (which only makes your net worth as FM worse), and that you will never slow down productivity as FM (e.g., taking parental leave, working fewer hours in your late 50s and early 60s). Even ignoring these exacerbating factors, you are essentially saying that you want to sacrifice 6 years of your life (med school and residency are not chill) so that at age 39, you can have $10,000 more as a FM vs. just staying a PA. Alternatively, you can stay a PA, which would mean enjoying the rest of your 20s, having stable hours, better wellbeing because of relatively lower stress, vacations, etc. Is that worth it to you? But wait, there's also your pension, which is valued at $1,050,000. As FM, you'd have to save $35,000/year over a 30-year career to equal that pension value. In other words, let's subtract $35,000 from the FM post-tax salary, making it equal to $115,000. If we do that, then it would take until age 50 for your FM net worth to be higher than your PA net worth. Again, the net worth difference isn't much: $14,000. So up to you, but to me, putting up with all of med school, etc. isn't worth it to just be $14,000 ahead at age 50. Of course, you can make more than $250,000 pre-tax/post-overhead as FM, but after speaking to several FM physicians and shadowing them, that would be working very, very hard...for *most* physicians, that requires much more than the 37.5 hours/week you currently work. Even the $250,000 post-overhead is not easy; FM physicians are going from room-to-room, doing quick 10 to 15-minute appointments, lots of paperwork, etc. It's hard work and you really have to earn every dollar you make. There are those who do walk-ins exclusively and make crazy money, but not everyone can handle the 2-5 minute walk-in appointments, and who knows, the government may restrict walk-in practice because it is very lucrative. So all in all, if it's just about the money, I agree that you're already in a great place and should just enjoy your life now. There is a reason that residents, even with the prospect of making multiples of your salary in a few years, are telling you that you've got a good gig. It's not always about salary in an absolute sense, but everything else that comes with it (lifestyle, how early you earn that salary, pension, benefits, stress, etc.). Also consider that many physicians will have a partner who stays home to take care of the family (i.e., no income earned from the partner). Given your hours and benefits, you can just find a partner who makes a similar salary to you and be a double-income household with a reasonable lifestyle, and then be close to earning what a FM makes. For completeness, here's the math for family medicine, assuming your cost of living + tuition is 45,000 per year (25,000 tuition + 20,000 for living, rent, etc.), and then ~65,000 income as a resident, and then $250,000 pre-tax income as FM: Age 25 (M1): $-45,000; 26 (M2): $-90,000; 27 (M3): $-135,000; 28 (M4): $-180,000; 29 (PGY1): $-115,000; 30 (PGY2): $-50,000 31 (FM): $100,000 32 (FM): $250,000 ...Skip to 39 ($250,000 + $150,000 x 7): 39: $1,300,000
  9. 6 points
    petitmonstre111

    Medicine...

    so you want to trade your current 6 figures M-F 7.5 hrs, no overnight call + benefits/pension for family medicine...? I mean sure you could, but whyyyy would you do this to yourself. Financially speaking, it doesn't make much sense at all. If it's for other reasons, then yeah go ahead...?
  10. 6 points
    corgi321

    Invite Countdown

    I for one would like to know if I got an interview in the first place
  11. 6 points
    corgi321

    Invite Countdown

    Alright my boss is gonna kill me for getting nothing done today, time to do 7 hours worth of work in 2 hours. I'll see y'all Monday morning
  12. 6 points
    mastermucocele

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    Alright guys we’ll meet back here Monday??
  13. 6 points
    greysweater

    Invite Countdown

    Does anyone else have a feeling that it won't come out today? Or just me
  14. 6 points
  15. 5 points
    BigDreamer

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    Agreed! I love the sense of community that can be found here, compared to the feeling of competition between pre-med students. I find the neuroticism actually alleviates the feeling that I'm the only one who is obsessing a little bit, and gives me a little laugh So fingers crossed it is in the next 24 hours so that we can breathe a little easier over the weekend
  16. 5 points
    corgi321

    Invite Countdown

    Also in case anyone needs clarification - I was joking LOL, I don't actually think that Dalhousie forgot...well aware that COVID is the likely reason for the delay, it's just fun discussing the anxiety of waiting with others on this forum
  17. 5 points
    mastermucocele

    Invite Countdown

    I agree with @greysweater. A lot of people don’t have any premed supports around them (me included) so it’s nice to be able to have a little group to talk to. Especially this year, where a lot of people are home and more socially isolated. While I agree no one needs to bug the admissions committee with emails, everyone is just anxious and excited! Live and let live.... if it bugs ya so much just don’t read the forums
  18. 5 points
    corgi321

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    I'm convinced if they don't come out tomorrow then they forgot about us this year or something
  19. 5 points
    LivySmall

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    guys every single time someone posts in this thread and I get the email notification I literally have a frckn heart attack
  20. 5 points
    New update! The website has been changed again and now says we will hear back between October 21-30!
  21. 5 points
    I'm not sure where all these rumours for the numbers for "internal cutoffs" come from, but it's not 3.85 and I'd take these circulating rumours with a huge grain of salt. I got in this past cycle with a 3.82 as an undergrad (albeit off the waitlist)
  22. 5 points
    marsaturn20

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    Unpopular opinion, maybe we'll expect from Dalhousie next Friday (Oct 23rd)? Technically, this week is the second week of October (since the first 3 days of October could not be counted as a "full week." And I also think this date is more or less one month from the interview date. Nevertheless, I am also anxious to know what my fate will be
  23. 5 points
    yeescience

    Invite Countdown

    I asked my brother to try because I was too anxious lmao! But they're working remotely so there's only e-mail option or leave a voicemail. Ahhhhhh
  24. 5 points
    corgi321

    Invite Countdown

    I hope that’s bc they were busy finalizing invites to send them out today...god everyone on this thread including me is so neurotic LOL
  25. 5 points
    #YOLO

    Case study... on myself??

    lmao yall wild
  26. 5 points
    soleil1234

    Étalon Des Cotes Umontréal

    J'ai 26 ans. Je ne m'arrête pas à ça, puisque j'adore étudier/apprendre. Les études sont longues, mais quand on aime ce que l'on fait, on ne le voit plus autant comme un sacrifice (du moins, plus aussi important, car il y a toujours l'aspect financier). C'est pour cette raison, je crois, que j'ai eu 4.2 en méd vét. tout en faisant aussi une maîtrise en sciences vét. (4.3/4.3). D'ailleurs, est-ce qu'elle sera comptabilisée? J'ai oublié ce détail. J'ai suis aussi une maman! Dans 10 ans, j'aurais 10 ans de plus que je sois vétérinaire ou aux études en médecine humaine. Je sais que ce n'est pas aussi simple que de se dire ça. On crée nos opportunités et si on veut que ça fonctionne, il faut mettre des priorités. Comme j'ai mentionné, je ne suis pas convaincue pour le moment de faire le changement.
  27. 4 points
    Choose people that choose you. Med school can be cliquish and even small differences between people in terms of background, life experiences or ethnicity can sometimes get exaggerated. There's usually an "in" crowd, but I'd suggest focusing on finding a few other people that genuinely accept you and want to spend time or really engage with you rather than trying to "fit in". Don't take it personally at all and just accept that people can be kind of superficial. Be open to having friends outside of medicine (or at other medical schools) as they can help provide balance to your medical school experience. Try and get into whatever activities you enjoy and basically chart your own course. Don't judge and be open to things changing, but don't expect things to change either. I understand the social challenge though, and believe it was one of the most disappointing factors for me personally too, although I am non-trad, with significant life experience and had linguistic (and related) challenges in Quebec, where almost everyone else was very homogenous and much earlier in their lives (I wasn't familiar with the region either). Plus the pre-clinical curriculum involved mostly individual study with limited immersion and interaction (which didn't help with my language challenges either).
  28. 4 points
    yeescience

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    I agree with everyone in the comments directly above! It's been really helpful, especially if you're in a COVID hot spot like me (e.g. Downtown Toronto) and even going for a walk to blow off some steam is not particularly recommended at this moment! No shame and hopefully we can keep providing this virtual community of support to those who feel they need it!
  29. 4 points
    sally1999

    Invite Countdown

    Will today be the day?
  30. 4 points
    Je te souhaite bonne chance! Une médecin qui arrive du domaine des soins infirmiers, on en a besoin de plus!
  31. 4 points
    offmychestplease

    Medicine...

    FM docs in AB can make 500,000/year- 600,000/year working full-time walk in clinics 50h/week....there are FM grads on this forum working 50 hours a week in ON making 425,000-450,000 straight out of residency...both numbers are after overhead...there also other payment modules like FMOs and options to make things more interesting too...this is after a chill 2 year residency and more than many specialists with triple the residency+fellowship training time (years of lost income too...). This does not include other reasons like job security/job market/no need for fellowship/job flexibility etc Really not going to get into details but your post shows a lot of ignorance about FM. Financially speaking as you say, FM is among the best choices in medicine.
  32. 4 points
    BigDreamer

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    Yupp, another day of slightly frayed nerves. Love that for us. I'll be here every day this week
  33. 4 points
    rli2

    Invite Countdown

    Not healthy... but have just been sitting refreshing my email... apologies to my supervisor for the lack of productivity today
  34. 4 points
    yeescience

    Invite Countdown

    If anyone builds up the courage to call, can they let us all know haha
  35. 4 points
    Mr. A

    Optométrie UdeM 2021

    Salut! J'ai fait ce thread pour tous ceux qui font une demande en optométrie pour l'automne 2021 ou même pour ceux qui ont juste des questions.
  36. 4 points
    Mr. A

    APPLICATION MÉDECINE VÉTÉRINAIRE 2021

    Beware the creepy impostor LOOL I like it, t'as le spirit hahahah
  37. 4 points
    8lue

    Info admission - automne 2021

    Exact... ça oblige les gens à rester plus longtemps dans leur programme tremplin $$$. les gens en deuxième année vont compter comme universitaires! Car leurs session d’automne et d’hiver (et d’été) de la première année va être prise en compte.
  38. 4 points
    I don't understand the stigma about high-achieving individuals looking out for opportunities? How do you know the applicants are not diverse, other than by their CVs? What if they're low SES? Refugees? Members of the LGBTQ community? People of colour? - It's not like none of the members of these marginalized groups can achieve good grades and extensive CVs.
  39. 4 points
    Mr. A

    Info admission - automne 2021

    ****** TRÈS IMPORTANT ****** La directrice du Service de l'admission et du recrutement de l'UdeM a parlée par rapport aux admissions 2021 et elle nous dit: "Pour les admissions d'automne 2021, pour les 5 doctorats [de premier cycle], les notes d'automne [2020] ne seront pas inclues dans le calcul, tout comme ça va se faire également dans les autres universités québécoises qui ont des programmes similaires."
  40. 3 points
    I just started medical school this year. Going in I was told that medical school is the place where you will meet a lot of new friends with similar interests and make memories that last for a lifetime. Even as I observed the upper year medical students over the last few years, they all seemed to get along well with each other and I always admired how they went on trips together, did activities together and were friends with each other outside of medical school. But more than half a semester into med school I don't feel the same way. I feel socially outcasted on a constant basis. Like I can talk to people one on one pretty well but then once the group gets a little bigger, i find myself to be excluded from the conversations despite my efforts to fit in. I also find that I have been excluded from a lot of activities that have been going on within our class. For instance a group of classmates planned to go camping together at the beginning of the semester and I didn't even hear about it until after. Further more, My classmates would start conversations with me and then leave me on read when I respond. Initially I thought, I maybe a little socially awkward as a person but I never had trouble making friends in undergrad. Also I should mention that I went to medschool in the same university in which I did the undergrad and I took the traditional pre-med route as well. And I swear to god I am not a terrible person. I understand that this year has been tough to make friends especially cause our in-person times are so limited but I am starting to feel frustrated. Especially because I feel like I am the only one going through this. I can't really talk about it to me non-med friends because I am the lucky one who made it. When I try to talk about it with my family I get told that I should just focus on studies and not care about the social aspects as much. But as a person who has been used to having a fairly strong social presence throughout most stages of life, this has been very disheartening. Even though I love the academic aspect of med school so far, the lack of this social aspect has started to make me not like med school already and I really don't want to be that bitter med student who suffers through their 4 years because of this. I am not sure where I am going wrong with this lol. And I am not really sure why I chose to vent this out on the forum but any insight on how to deal with this issue would be appreciated.
  41. 3 points
    I feel your pain. I moved to a new province and its been a much harder transition than I thought because of the pandemic. I miss my family so much and it's hard to concentrate on work when you don't feel settled in your new environment. I am taking it day by day. I relieved I am not the only one feeling like this.
  42. 3 points
    JLLP

    Invite Countdown

    I'm going to ruffle a few feathers with this post, but a lot of you guys need to take a deep breath, close your eyes, take a step back, and exhale. Some of you are using this forum as a way to co-ruminate undue neuroticism and thats not healthy. There's a time and place for support among compatriots, but this thread has gone beyond that. DAL hasn't forgotten about sending out invites, they will do it - in time. It's written in multiple places on their website that they will send out invites sometime in October. We are the 22nd. Ya'll are basing your "interview release" date on a sample size of 2-3 past years when the current year is certainly an anomaly. It could happen today, tomorrow, next week - heck, it can even be delayed! The point is that DAL will communicate in time. Go outside, enjoy life, know that everything at this point is in the hands of the great cosmic aether. The only thing excessively worrying is going to accomplish is reinforce future worry.
  43. 3 points
    rmorelan

    Medicine...

    I mean that isn't much more conservative - That is right in the range of average. Doesn't mean people cannot do more of course, and there are many ways family doctors have increased it. Medicine's flexibility is one of its strengths. Your are right in terms of the positives! I would say to be complete you have to add the say 150K+ in costs of med school, the lost of after tax income for the 4 years and any return you would make on any money invested from that, the likely interest on the costs of med school, and whatever else you could have earned in all the extra time you are now spending studying (which for the motivated is definitely not zero). Also you double your salary but the doubled part is taxed at a much higher rate than the first half so your real increase is less than half. There is also the likely loss of a true pension which is something worth a definite real value above your base salary of no small amount. I am 100% not saying someone shouldn't do it - if I were to do that in fact I would have to call myself out because I basically did do that when I left my career as a software engineer to go into medicine (and you have to at least start with this math assuming you would get family medicine as you cannot assume you would get any particular field you want). I would just caution saying it is a no brainer though from pure economics. Even as staff now in a higher paying speciality it will take years to mathematically come out ahead here from what I was doing with my prior high savings rate. Still glad I did make the choice I did.
  44. 3 points
    Raton

    APPLICATION MÉDECINE VÉTÉRINAIRE 2021

    Si au moins on pouvait savoir si notre test était complètement pourri ou dans la moyenne. C'est ma troisième fois et je commence à me sentir un peu usée face au Casper!
  45. 3 points
    Bonjour @Nojustice! Vraiment désolé pour ton refus, je comprends qu'il est effectivement très décevant de ne pas atteindre ton but d'être admis après avoir mis tant d'effort... Si tu regardes bien le processus d'admission de cette année, les convocations aux entrevues se font seulement par la CRU des candidats (donc, par logique, le GPA + le programme dans lequel tu es), donc il n'est pas du tout normal que tu te fasses refuser tandis que les gens dans le même programme que toi se font convoquer. Avais-tu pensé à demander une révision de dossier? Toutefois, je ne pense sincèrement pas qu'il y ait eu de discrimination raciale durant le processus d'admission, surtout cette année, comme le processus d'admission est pas mal anonyme (ta CRU est rattachée à ton matricule, pas ton nom, et le test CASPer est toujours corrigée de façon anonyme (les évaluateurs voient seulement ce que tu as écrit, pas ton nom, ni ton visage)). La seule raison pour laquelle je penserais qu'ils pourraient te refuser est qu'il pourrait te manquer certains prérequis comme tu n'as pas fait ton cégep ici (il faut que tu aies fait tes cours de biologie/calcul/physique/chimie au cégep ou des cours qu'ils jugent équivalents à l'Université avant de rentrer en médecine), mais sinon, je pense vraiment qu'il s'agissait d'une erreur. Par curiosité, où avais-tu déposé une demande? Si jamais tu décides de redéposer une demande pour l'année qui s'en vient, je pense que McGill serait une bonne option pour toi, comme ils tiennent compte de toutes tes implications/prix scolaires (contrairement au reste des facultés francophones où les seuls moments pour démontrer tes valeurs/capacités/implications sont pas mal limités au CASPer et aux MEMs), et qu'ils valorisent les candidats moins traditionnels (surtout ceux qui ont plus de bagage d'expérience de vie)! Encore une fois, je comprends ta déception, et je te souhaite rien de moins que la meilleure des chances l'année prochaine si tu décides de réappliquer!
  46. 3 points
    Rebecca216

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    the last two years we also didn't have a pandemic
  47. 3 points
    Je confirme ! J’avais écris aussi au courriel la des admissions pharmacie Ulaval, ils m’ont dit que le Casper la date limite est le 4 mars ! Et ce, même si la date limite du depot des dossiers.. est Le 1 er novembre ( Pr les universitaires )
  48. 3 points
    Mr. A

    Workload Physio vs doctorats

    Salut tout le monde! Pour ceux qui ont étudié dans le programme de physiothérapie et qui se sont fait accepter en DMD, OD ou PharmD, j'ai une question pour vous. Est-ce que la charge de travail de physio vs ces doctorats est similaire majoritairement? Je sais que ces programmes sont des doctorats, donc beaucoup plus de crédits, mais est-ce qu'il y a un certain niveau de similitude au niveau du workload? C'est juste pour me donner une idée. Merci!
  49. 3 points
    M112

    Info admission - automne 2021

    Exactement, surtout pour les collégiens qui ont besoin de 0,X de cote et qui prennent les places des universitaires en étant acceptés dès leur 1re session a cause de leur grosses CRC!! J’espère que ca va faire bouger les LA plus rapidement aussi ...
  50. 3 points
    As a current IM R3 going through the medicine subspecialty CaRMS match, I wouldn't necessarily say it's harder than the R1 CaRMS match but it does have its own unique challenges and arguably higher stakes. The biggest difference is that MSM CaRMS is on an accelerated timeline which gives you less room for error. MSM CaRMS happens near the beginning of the R3 year, which really only gives you 2 years of core IM residency to explore different subspecialties and settle on one, do research, try to pump out a publication or two, and do electives in said specialty. Most IM programs only have three 4-week elective blocks in total occurring in PGY-2/3, which leaves little room for "experimentation" when you need all the elective time you can get for exposure and reference letters. In most cases, you'll need to have decided on a specialty by late R1/early R2 when you need to be booking away electives as they tend to fill up quickly. MSM CaRMS itself is also accelerated with there being only 3 months between applications opening to match day, versus ~5 months for the R1 match. As stated earlier in this thread, the most important thing is that you only have 1 shot at MSM CaRMS as an R3. There is a 1st and 2nd round just like in the R1 match, but if you go unmatched after the 2nd round you will default to doing a 4th year of GIM training and then entering independent practice as a general internist. You're considered ineligible for the subspecialty match if you've ever participated in the past, which disqualifies you from taking a "research year" and re-entering CaRMS the next year like what some people do with the R1 match. Obviously this can be devastating if you've dreamt of being an interventional cardiologist your whole life, because at that point you've already invested 9+ years of training between undergrad, medical school, and IM residency. Some people who go unmatched do find ways to secure fellowship positions outside of CaRMS, but this is uncommon and not something to bank on. I will say that MSM CaRMS has been a less painful and more intimate process compared to the R1 match, because you're competing against a smaller pool of applicants and being interviewed by many people you've likely worked with or met at conferences before. The CaRMS numbers game isn't quite as punishing as with the R1 match as well. Generally, most applicants with an average-above average profile who are willing to apply broadly will match to their desired specialty somewhere, as long as they're not going for something ultra-competitive. Based on the match numbers in Canada, I would rank the competitiveness of subspecialties in the average year as follows: 1. Need to gun hard: Cardiology, GI, Respirology, ICU (not solely a medicine subspecialty) 2. Moderately competitive: Endocrinology, Rheumatology 3. If you're a good applicant, you'll match: GIM, Hematology, Nephro, ID, Med Onc 4. Basically a guaranteed match: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, Pain Medicine Certain specialties in certain years will be abnormally competitive, but this has been the general trend over the last few years.
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