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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/07/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Intermediate

    Post-Interview 2017-2018

    I didn't do too well in traditional, and screwed up with 3/8 mmi stations. I'm looking for a miracle to happen.
  2. 2 points
    HongHongHong

    Help for agpa

    I believe ssmed is correct. From the demonstration calculations, it appears that if your lowest year is only 24 credits, then you must have at least 114 credits to have those removed.
  3. 1 point
    JohnGrisham

    Tuition Cost of Undergrad

    This is a canadian premedical forum, i dont think youll get many replies for your inquiry. Check out Studentdoctornetwork instead. It is american based.
  4. 1 point
    hartk48

    Post-Interview 2017-2018

    I wouldn't count on your gut feeling, you may have completely killed those stations. Its just hard to tell because some of the interviewers were so intimidating!
  5. 1 point
    MemUni

    Post-Interview 2017-2018

    I did completely awful on 3/8 Mmi stations and the other 5 were still not great at all.....we can hope for a miracle together
  6. 1 point
    user82829383831

    Help for agpa

    @YesIcan55 Are you sure that's correct? On the website it states: "In order to have the academic year with the lowest academic average dropped, applicants must have 90 credits with grades remaining by June 1 of the application year. Courses in progress from June 1 onward do not count toward the AGPA." Meaning if your worst year = 24 credits, you must have at least 114 credits by June 1 in order for those 24 credits to be removed?
  7. 1 point
    I'd also like to contribute to this! I was accepted to Schulich and felt like this was an important reason I received an interview. If you would like general tips/edits/etc., I'll do my best to help you out!
  8. 1 point
    Praise_Kek

    Correction Examens - Injustice?

    T'es tellement une personne désagréable. L'auteur du thread a clairement raison sur le point qu'il tente d'expliquer. Un examen de 20 questions, c'est crissement ridicule et n'évalue absolument pas la connaissance ni la compréhension des étudiants. Btw, juste pour te contredire: À UL, AKA la meilleure faculté de médecine, l'auteur du thread serait bien plus heureux. => Si une question est annulée, le point est donné à tout le monde, justement pour éviter que les étudiants soient pénalisés en raison d'une erreur provenant du professeur et non des étudiants. => Tous les examens sont uniformes et standardisés. De ce fait, nous connaissons la valeur de chacune des questions durant l'examen. Aucun secret. Sais-tu ce qu'est réellement du nivellement vers le bas, Snowmen? C'est de ne pas crisser en dehors vos professeurs incompétents qui ne sont pas foutus de rédiger des questions qui ont de l'allure et ne même pas prendre le temps de les relire avant de distribuer l'examen aux étudiants. Incompétence pure et simple. Votre faculté est même pas foutue de faire la différence entre un candidat collégien ou universitaire. HIGH TIER UNIVERSITY ça mon homme! (Le tu est personnel et te vise particulièrement)
  9. 1 point
    Alk

    Notes numériques supérieures a A+ ?

    En raison du format questions-à-choix multiple des examens en sciences au premier cycle, il n'y a pas grandes différences dans les connaissances/potentiel d'un étudiant qui a 100 et d'un étudiant qui a 92-94. En effet, même si tu maîtrise parfaitement la matière, il n'est pas rare de faire des fautes sur un concept maitrisé mais dont la question et les réponses sont écrites de façons nébuleuse. Donc généralement, dans les QCM les notes au dessus de 94% sont plus dues à la chance ou à la clarté du prof que des facultés de l'élève. Tout ça pour dire que je ne crois pas qu'il est pertinent d'avoir un grade au dessus de A+. Même que pour McGill, la notation littéraire maximale que tu peux avoir est un A et ça équivaut à 85% comme à l'udem, donc pour McGill, il n'y pas de différence entre 85% et 100%. D'ailleurs ça paraît quand même dans ton relevé de note quand tu vises 95% au lieu de 90%. Ceux qui ont des moyennes générales de 90% ont généralement des GPA de 4.15/4.30, tandis que ceux qui maintiennent des moyennes de 95% ont habituellement des GPA supérieurs à 4.25.
  10. 1 point
    Mithril

    I'm burning out

    I felt burned out many times during my training in med school and in residency. You're not suffering alone. But now I love what I do. It's important to not let the workload consume you. Spending time with friends and family and doing hobbies outside of medicine will keep you healthy and sane. It feels liberating to finally be out of school.
  11. 1 point
    Very possible. I studied 2 weeks for the DAT and scored 90+ percentile in all categories other than manual dexterity (never bothered for soap carving since UofT doesn't require it). 7 Weeks would be overkill in my opinion.
  12. 1 point
    Intrepid86

    How much sleep do you get?

    Sleep is for wimps and dermatologists.
  13. 1 point
    Hey Beez, I was accepted into western, queens, UofT, and UofAlberta (waitlisted mac 15) so I'll try to help out! But much of what I would say has been covered so I'll just second what's already been said. Unfortunately, sgpa is a huge portion of the application process as schools can have upwards of 1300 applications to filter through so making the gpa cutoff is important so taking easy course regardless of the level will 100% be beneficial! I also agree that for OT, you would be a very competitive applicant (however I know I hated it when people told me to do OT cause PT is so hard to get into but let me tell you it's possible!!). So if you want PT as bad as it sounds, just dive in and go for it. I also agree that if you want PT, apply to many programs, dont limit yourself to only a few, you never know which programs will be looking for a certain ideal candidate you could deff be one with your experience if you can make that first gpa cutoff. UofT does for some reason have a reputation of being harder to get into, but they interview more people than other schools i.e mac & UofAlberta so it might be better for you as if you get passed that gpa cutoff you can then allow your experience to shine during the interviews. I also know many good physios who took a few tried to get accepted so you have the right idea, if you dont get in next year keep trying for the next cycle!! Don't let anyone tell you that you cant do it and dont let everyone else's applications on here overwhelm you. Yours on paper would be strong if you can boost that gpa enough to make the cuts in my opinion. This year was my first applying but I've been following this forum for a bit and can tell you from experience that spending countless hours looking at everyone else's profile who got accepted is just gonna make you more overwhelmed and stressed like I was for the last few years until last month haha!
  14. 1 point
    Hey, just to clarify this. UBC uses your most recent 10 from 300-400/upper level courses. Their web site also says they use a combination of pre-req GPA and most recent upper level courses to make interview offers. HopefulPT is correct in that it takes around an 85+ just to get an interview. It took me 2 tries to get in to the regular cohort with an avg just over 87% and over 1000 clinical experience hours. My advice would be to improve your GPA and keep on volunteering. Definitely look into multiple schools as well (Queens might be a good choice as mentioned above). Hopefully this helps you out. Best of luck following your dreams!
  15. 1 point
    meromelo

    Étalon Des Cotes Umontréal

    GPA Biologie (bacc connexe) : 3.929 CRU : 34.503
  16. 1 point
    username9999

    Success Stories- Non Trad Style!

    made a new account for this because I want to keep my personal history pretty personal. I'm gonna start my non-trad story with I never wanted to go to med school. People ask (based on the undergrad program I was enrolled in and pressured (Asian parents) me to go to med school and I told them to f* off. Even though I was never intended to go to med school, I couldn't deny that I was interested in physiology of the human body. I had a rough childhood. My father molested me for almost 10 years and was a gambler who pushed our family to financial ruin. He eventually ended up homeless after my parents divorced. My mother was generally neglectful and tended to focus on herself (in one instance, she won't let me use the only computer we had to finish a school project because she also had a project to work on, then proceeded to wake me up at 2am to tell me that I can do my school work now). All to say, school was the only place I was happy. I lived off the praise of my teachers and the warmth of my friends. My life was school and I didn't see how I could live without it. I also saw it as a way out of my family. When I entered UG, I did so with a small scholarship due to having good grades in high school. It occurred to me that good grades = money. And obviously money = not homeless. (My parents were not supporting me and for a while, I had to financially support my father.) So I kept my GPA up. I got involved with research mostly because it paid. In hindsight, I could've worked at bars or something and get paid there, but I was still terrified of life outside of school so I kept my employment opportunities within academia. I discovered that I really liked research in second year UG and figured that I'll be doing a PhD after UG and stay in academia for the rest of my life. I buried myself in school, shunning all manner of social life and extracurriculars (save for my research lab). My UG program was a small honors program within biomedical sciences, where 9 out of 10 people were aiming for med school (you can guess it, I'm the 1 out 10 who wasn't interested in medicine). I used to look at the premeds I was in school with with disdain - thinking they were all running around volunteering, VP something to get an extra line on their CV. In hindsight, I think part of the disdain may have been envy because I didn't have the luxury of volunteering even if I wanted to. I could never take the summer off because I'd have no money for rent. Staying at home with parents was out of the question (one Christmas, my mom and I ate nothing but potato and mayonnaise for the entire two weeks because that's how empty the fridge had become). I got accepted to a prestigious lab in Europe with a handsome stipend of 27 000 EUR. It was supposed to be a dream come true. Only it wasn't. I moved to Europe only to face culture shock, language shock, and a complete lack of guidance at the lab. I realized I didn't like research as much as I thought. All my previous lab experience involved working with a partner or mentor. In Europe, I was given a bench, a set of pipette and told to just do something. I missed the human contact. I also realized that which I do still like research, I only liked research if I can see how it could be applied to a human problem. I was wholly uninterested in basic research of mechanism and genes. I lasted less than a year, but it was there that I remember thinking for the first time that I might want to go to med school. I came back to Canada and started a Master's in a different field. A part of me was not ready to accept that the entire life path I had laid out for myself was not meant to be. My master's only proved my initial instinct right. As I came to accept that I will not be happy in research, I started searching frantically for alternatives. There was a lot of soul searching during my two years of my master's. Beyond trying to figure out what I wanted, I started caring more about passing on what I have learned to others when it is of help. I was no longer in "survival" mode. Finances started to get better at the end of my UG with my father being out of the picture after both my mom and I put our feet down and stopped supporting him. I had started dealing with the near decade of molestation that left me unable to form relationships with people. My stipend from Europe left me with a few thousand in savings. I was also getting a livable stipend for my Master's. For once, I could do what I wanted to do rather than what I had to do to keep a roof over my head. I realized that you can't help others until you can help yourself. Until then, I couldn't help others because I myself needed all the help I could provide. I started volunteering with groups that work with disadvantaged populations. Around this time, I was considering med school more seriously. I started asking friends about the process, but I was still hesitating. I don't think I believed that I could get in. I knew that the odds of acceptance were crazy low and you basically needed a 4.0, a ton of ECs and a stellar MCAT. I had high enough GPA (thank you, fear), but not much for ECs and definitely no MCAT. I was scared of the MCAT because, again, I know that people take months to study and the exam itself was hundreds of dollars. I would not be able to afford writing it multiple times in a year and by the time I decided I was going to apply to med, it was already Aug and I didn't think I had the time to study. The cost of the application still scared me. Oct 1 rolled by and I'd basically convinced myself that next year is when I'd apply. Meanwhile, I was pretty unhappy with my master's. I hated how it was me, at my computer, by myself all the live long day. October 18 was day I broke. I remember that someone told me McGill does not require the MCAT. I went on McGill's admission website and lo and behold, I had 13 days more days before the deadline. 13 days to prepare an app. By then, I was willing to try anything. I pulled my app together. Submitted everything by Oct 28. 6 months later, I got my acceptance and the rest is history. I didn't want to be a doctor since I was a little girl (in truth, I wanted to be a marine biologist and chase after whales). I didn't fit in premed cookie cutter. I'm still having a hard time finding a social group that I belong. But at least I know I'm in the right place now. After seeing my preceptor helping a family get free infant formula (the mother couldn't produce breast milk), advocating for her patients through divorces and custody battles with abusive ex's I feel like this is a profession where I could do everything I feel is important to do.
  17. 1 point
    t0ny

    Étalon Des Cotes Umontréal

    Who cares si t'es accepter partout lol
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