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  1. 29 points
    This thread inspired me and gave me hope to pursue my medical school dream. Thank you to all that have posted on here before. You have all truly touched my heart. It is because of your stories, that today, I also have the pleasure of posting here and sharing my own journey. When I was younger and about to head to university, I had a tough time choosing between pursuing a business degree or a science degree. At that time, I knew my interests were in biology and psychology, but seeing my parents labouring hard on the farm, I felt pressured to help support the family and make money fast. So, I decided to pursue a finance degree, work in investment banking, and provide enough money to make my family comfortable, then pursue my interests afterward. It was a naïve and misguided plan. From the first moment in business school, I already felt like I didn’t fit in. This feeling got worse 4 years later when I began working in investment banking. The hours were grueling, and I was completely uninterested in what I was doing. I kept at it for 2.5 years because it helped me pay my debts, supported my family, and made my parents proud. But one day, I reached my breaking point. I was out of shape, burnt out, and depressed. I woke up dreading the new day to begin. So, I finally quit, at the shock of my parents. They didn’t understand why I would give up a lucrative and prestigious career. I didn’t know how to explain it to them either. So, I decided to travel. Backpacked by myself across Southeast Asia for 6 months. When I was in Cambodia wandering the night markets, I walked past a bookstand selling novels for $1 USD. Not sure if it was fate or intuition, but I chose to buy the book The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. It was a book that changed my life. It helped me rediscover my passion and interests in life. I started focusing on things that I loved to do. Travel. Eat. Exercise. Health. Science. Languages. During this process of self-discovery, I developed a strong interest in healthcare and medicine. However, I was still too afraid to pursue it. The time, the commitment, and the financial burden all seemed too daunting. I also convinced myself that I wasn’t good enough to be a doctor. That I wouldn’t be able to handle the responsibilities that came with life and death. So, I became a travel agent instead. I had a lot of fun, met many amazing people, and excelled at the role. I traveled to over 35 countries. Life was exciting, and I felt content. However, the idea of medicine never left my mind. It kept gnawing at me every day and I eventually began to feel too comfortable at my job. It was at this time I met my fiancée (on Tinder, lol.) He was in his 3rd year of pharmacy and applying to medicine at the same time. His mother was a nurse. His grandmother was a military doctor. I was suddenly immersed in a world of healthcare. Watching my fiancée work hard and challenge himself every day made something click in me. I started to think that I might still have a chance at medical school. Couple months later, I went on a Mediterranean cruise with my family. I was sitting in the hot tub and decided to strike up a conversation with the person next to me. We talked, and he asked me what I did. I'm not sure what came over me, but for the first time in my life, I told someone out loud, "I'm going to become a doctor." It was a liberating moment. Everything suddenly felt real and achievable. And fate would have it, the person whom I was talking was an army doctor who graduated from McGill Medical School. He was traveling with his wife in Europe before beginning his next station in the UK. He said, "Go for it!" And I did. I quit my job in December 2016 and began studying for the MCAT full time. I also enrolled in 2 semesters of English to obtain enough credits to meet the UBC admission requirements. After 5 years without reading a textbook, it was a brutal transition. And with zero science prerequisites under my belt, it was so much harder than I thought. Furthermore, some of my friends and family did not take me seriously and discouragingly told me not to "waste my time." It was a challenging few months. Many days, I felt overwhelmed. But, I survived due to a wonderful support network. I listened to those who believed in me and ignored the ones who were negative. I acknowledged my weaknesses and sought help and advice. I studied 8-10 hours a day, 6 days a week, for 7 months and self-taught myself the sciences. I took the exam in July 2017 and achieved a score of 508. It was below the average admission score, but good enough to give the application a try. I applied widely to as many schools as I could. 5 schools rejected me. 3 schools interviewed me. And a miracle happened. I got an acceptance. It was an unbelievable moment. I felt all the worry, pain, and doubt just wash away. All the time I spent, all the risks I took, all the sacrifices I made, paid off. Everything was worth it and I was the happiest girl in the world. Finally, at 27 years old, I will begin medical school in Fall of 2018. The moral of my story: Don’t ever let anyone tell you what you can or cannot achieve. Only you can decide that for yourself. Also, remember that: "We are, at any moment, capable of pursuing our dreams... And, when you want something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it." - The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho If medicine is your dream, don't give up. Never, ever give up.  I sincerely wish you the best of luck on your journey.
  2. 28 points
    TIME STAMP: 9:00AM Result: Admitted with Condition (MDCM) cGPA: 3.80, pre-reqGPA: 3.4 MCAT: Not submitted ECs: Lots. Year: B.Sc. + B. Sc. + M. Sc. Interview preparation : Did 0 preparation. Not a single book. Nothing. Post-interview feeling right after : I had no regrets and I was proud. That was enough for me. Post-interview feeling weeks after : You start to question everything. That's normal. Let it go. Attempt : Fourth attempt IP/OOP/International: IP I never thought I would ever post on here. I was already enrolled for next semester to re-take my pre-requesites and I had paid the tuition for it. I had accepted that I would be refused. It is very hard to summarize a 10 years long journey in a few sentences. I could write a book about my journey, my feelings and my doubts. If I had to give advice to a future applicant, here is what I would say : Before getting accepted, try to accept the idea that it might never happen. Define yourself beyond your medical path. Don't do things because they would look good on a C.V. Live your life. Take every extra year as an opportunity to grow your life. Don't see it as an extra year of suffering and waiting. When you get accepted, everything makes sense. Every doubt you had suddenly turns into sparks of hope. It is very hard to describe. After you get accepted, life feels lighter but you realize that it's another journey that starts. I wish I could explain myself but I had the worst odds against me and I made it. Not because I am unique. Because I was lucky. I truly believe I am. Therefore, if it is your dream, follow your heart and never give up. Never give up. Never ever give up.
  3. 22 points
    It’s going to be a long one. I wrote all of this before I got in, because there is something wonderfully raw and vulnerable about documenting my reflections while I’m still on the outside looking in. I knew that if I was unsuccessful this cycle, I would still read it to remind myself of how far I’ve come. -- My non-trad path is nothing unusual- I suppose I am just a late bloomer who paid her dues after the fact. The biggest challenge for me, throughout this whole journey, was lacking the protective factors to cushion the falls. I have been financially independent, which means choices were often made to have a financial safety net rather than for improving my med school applications. I had no one within my social network to guide me; my family has not been supportive of my decisions, so I felt like I could never turn to them (as of now they still don’t know that I interviewed and got accepted). This forum taught me everything I needed to know about getting into medical school, and that being a physician is still a possibility for someone like me. I began university when I was 18, completely lacking in self-awareness and nowhere near ready to make any sort of decisions about my future. I went to UofT for life sciences. There’s that joke: “How many UofT students does it take to change a light bulb? Four; one to change it and three to crack under the pressure”. Well, I was one of the three. My time at UofT was the closest I’d come to being depressed. My marks were atrocious; I felt worthless and incompetent all the time. My family didn’t understand- and didn’t know how to- help me; no one told me “you should stop and figure your shit out before completely ruining your transcript”. I tried going to counselling but felt like I was not being listened to, so I never went back. Something was very wrong, I didn’t know what or how to fix it. Things at home were bad. In my final year, I cut all financial ties with my parents, and moved out- I needed to become my own person. The independence was exhilarating. The financial stress was real, but my mental health also improved 100%, and I gained the energy and mental clarity to finally start thinking about what I wanted in life. Unfortunately, at this point my marks (cGPA of 3.1, no year above 3.5) were useless for any post-grad program. I applied to Michener’s medical radiation program, a second-entry bachelor program, to become an X-ray tech. I got accepted, but opted to not attend-- for the first time, I thought about what I wanted in my career, and decided it was not for me. I decided to take a year off and consider other second degree options. I started to look into becoming a dietitian (other RDs on this forum, like Real Beef, were very helpful). This would be a competitive process with a lot more uncertainty than going to Michener. I had a lot to prove and nothing to show for it. I used the year to work several minimum wage jobs in healthcare to save up money for a year of unpaid dietetic internship that would follow my second undergrad, while getting volunteer experience in nutrition to start building my resume for dietetic internship applications. I started my second degree in nutrition with a lot of self-doubt. After UofT, I was uncertain that I could even pull off low 80s. I was sure that everyone was smarter than me, and that I was the loser who flunked a whole degree but still couldn’t keep up. But I also had a level of mental clarity and focus that I’d never felt before. And low and behold, I ended up finishing my first year with the highest average in my program. A 3.94. It was then that I realized I was onto something-for the first time, it seemed like medicine could be a possibility. I decided to extend my second degree into 3 years, to be eligible for Ottawa (ironically, I never interviewed at Ottawa), while building my application for dietetic internships. This led me to different opportunities in leadership, teaching, and working with low SES populations. After 2 years into my second degree, I wrote the MCAT while working full-time and self-teaching myself the material despite taking (and flunking) my pre-reqs 4-5 years before that. I was pleasantly surprised with a balanced 514 (however, with a CARS of 128, it was never good enough for Western). The year after, I graduated from my second degree with the highest cumulative average in my program. It took me 3 cycles to get my first and only interview at Queen’s. During my second cycle, I was completing my dietetic internship, which provided many opportunities to gain clinical and counselling skills, work with marginalized populations, lead QI projects, and work within interdisciplinary teams- I learned more about my interest and suitability for medicine in this 1 year than I had in my whole life prior to this. Internship was hard work, but also gave me small boosts of confidence and signs I am not a complete dumbass (e.g. a nephrologist who had no idea that I was applying to med, after listening to my renal case presentation, told me how impressed he was that I’ve shown level of knowledge that he’d only expect from a senior medical resident; 2 of my preceptors said that in their 10-20 years teaching, they’ve never seen a student work so hard to improve herself and be so dedicated to her patients; rotation after rotation I was praised for my critical thinking skills and natural ease in developing rapport with patients). This wasn’t just about ticking off boxes to get into med, but about developing my passion for hands-on learning and learning about my strengths and weaknesses as a professional. For the first time in my life, I thought “maybe I am good enough to become a doctor.” When I submitted my application for the third cycle, I had just graduated from internship and started working in public health in Northern Ontario. I moved here because I wanted to continue to step outside of my comfort zone. I wanted to do more advocacy and upstream work, and this was the place to do it. At around the time of decision day, I had applied to RD jobs in Alberta to gain IP status for U of C. So here’s what I’ve learned in the last five years: · Know yourself. Know your identity outside of being a premed. Figure out what your values are, what kind of a person you want to be, what drives you to take action, what triggers your mind to go down dark rabbit holes. This takes time and effort, and self-reflection from life experiences, but it helps to build resilience against the hurdles along the application process, medical training, and set-backs life in general. Knowing who you are and what you have to offer the world protects you against having your self-esteem and identity shattered when things don’t go as you had hoped; it gives you the courage to say “let’s try again.” when the world seems to tells you “you are not good enough.” Similarly, I hear too often that when people have spent their whole life dedicated to getting into med school, that when they finally get in, they feel a bit lost- “now what?”. I suppose that happens when you see getting in as a final destination rather than one of the stops along a never-ending journey of building yourself up. People around me couldn’t fathom where I got the persistence to keep at it despite facing setbacks and watching the years go by. It’s because I knew there is nothing valuable that a rejection can take away from me. I have been building myself up as a person. I am still going to be me, no matter what happens inside that interview room, and what May 8th brings. I still possess all the traits that I worked hard to develop and love about myself- my grit, self-awareness, intellectual curiosity, empathy, open-mindedness- and these are all going to carry me far in life, medicine or not. No rejection letter can take that away from me. · Figure out what you want to accomplish in medicine, outside of medicine. I always ask myself: what's appealing about a career as a physician, and how can I try to achieve it through another route? What skills do I want to use on a day to day basis in my career? What core values and beliefs will motivate me to do what I do in my career? I think reflecting on this helps to flesh out your motivations for pursuing medicine, helps to identify alternative career paths, and should you pursue an alternative path while you reapply, helps you to gain insights and skills that will be useful for medicine. Hopefully the adcoms will recognize this. If not, well, at least your satisfaction with your alternative path will still be pretty high. · Be kind to yourself. The playing field is not even, and you don’t need to add an additional layer of self-inflicted cruelty to the mix. It’s ok to not feel 100% determined all the time. When the self-doubt starts to creep in, sit on it, talk to someone (in my opinion, everyone should have a therapist). Use the insights from the above 2 points to ground yourself and as motivation to keep going. · Develop yourself in areas outside of academics. What saved me was working minimum wage jobs since I was 16 (I actually started out cleaning bathrooms, after I was fired from scooping ice cream for being too socially inept. True story.). 75% of my activities on my ABS were employment. I had to work, because I did not come from a background as privileged as that of many premeds. If the circumstances were different, perhaps I would’ve gotten in earlier. But the real world was the best teacher I’ve ever had- it helped me develop financial independence and literacy, character, resilience, and interpersonal skills that helped me along every step of this journey. It helped to shape my convictions of the kind of physician, what kind of person, I want to be. Ease yourself into uncomfortable situations today to build resilience against shit-hitting-the-fan moments later in life. --- I also want to say that sometimes on these forums, we read non-trad stories and it seems like people were 100% determined from the get-go while they stayed on this one path for 4-10 years. I know I wasn’t…and that’s ok. As a non-trad, you have more life decisions to make along your journey, some big, some small. I know that I had to make many decisions over the years to favour either my nutrition career, chances for med school, or my personal life- many times, these three conflicted. There’s no right way to go about it- it depends on your risk tolerance, other responsibilities in life, and priorities. Know yourself…this is so, so important. I feel so privileged that everything in my life lined up so perfectly to allow me to pursue this path long enough to eventually get accepted. I’m always happy to chat about second degrees, being an RD, or anything related. Stay positive and kind to yourself, PM101.
  4. 18 points
    6th time applying, 3rd time interviewing, still in shock to be posting this... Time Stamp: 12:25 PST Accepted, VFMP (first choice) AGPA: 86.55% MCAT: 512 (balanced, 129 CARS) ECs: Student government, orientations leader, crisis line volunteer, volunteering with various charities, hospital, lab assistant at various research labs (paid), CIHR funding for a summer, working at a gas station, currently working as a policy analyst for government, and a few very random but unique hobbies (honestly could have either really helped or not counted for anything, they're pretty out there) Geography: IP Year: BSc completed 2013, Master's completed 2016, currently working full-time Interview: Honestly felt like the best interview I've ever had, and I've done 12 (!) of them in the past 5 years. I walked out of every station this year feeling pretty good, and knew I absolutely nailed at least two of them (the acting station went almost perfectly, and there was one where I really felt I connected with the interviewer). There were some that were probably average, but I didn't feel like I bombed any of them - which was a first. Usually I walk out of them unsure and crossing my fingers that things worked out (it never did), this time was completely different. Stats from last year: NAQ: 29.00 AQ: 25.58 TFR: 54.58 Interview: Below Average (below average the year before as well) I feel so blessed to have finally received an acceptance to a Canadian medical school. I've been applying for years now, and have been given so many opportunities - which I always ended up blowing. I've interviewed at UBC the past 3 years, but I've interviewed at Calgary, McMaster, Alberta, and Saskatchewan (I had a really high old MCAT score) over the years. May has consistently been the worst month of the year for me, and last year was especially awful because I spent a lot of time practicing - every week for a couple hours since the previous summer - and still received a rejection. That was a pretty low point in my life tbh. The practice did help, but I think the thing really holding me back was my lack of maturity. I had always been very academically focused, and to be honest hadn't really had a chance to live a life. I think doing that the past few years - falling in love, going to bars with friends, arguing about politics, moving to my own place and dealing with laundry and dinner - has really helped me grow as a person, and I think permanently changed who I am. I went into each of those stations as if I was talking to my girlfriend about an interesting topic over lunch. I had fully formed opinions and thoughts on subjects because I'd argued about these things over beer with friends (and on reddit). I'd had cool experiences to talk about not just from volunteer activities, but also from disagreements with a roommate or co-workers, or from moving across the country for a master's program. Anyway, wanted to get that off my chest. This year really did feel different, and I'm glad it ended up being different. I interviewed at Calgary as well this year but felt terrible after (question style is very different from UBC imo, which I focused my preparation for), and got a rejection. I also interviewed at a US school and received an acceptance, but the tuition kind of terrifies me so I was still really stressed out this week. To those who didn't get an offer this year, trust me when I say I know how it feels. I've had a lot of experience trying to improve my application over the years, so if anyone wants some advice, or even just to chat or rant, please reach out through PM. This process really involves a lot of luck, and there are so many amazing people who don't get accepted every year. If you really want this, it'll happen eventually.
  5. 18 points
    Ok sorry for this long post but I had to share my thoughts to all current and future applicants that are facing disappointment. Everything written here is based on my humble opinion. If it can help one person, than I have achieved my goal. Introduction Since decision came out, a lot of amazing candidates learned that they were rejected. They may feel emptiness, doubts or sadness, thinking that their efforts were wasted. They may feel that even after re-doing basic sciences, reading books and working hard, it wasn't enough. I am just writing this post to let you know that we all go through that feeling. You are human and it is normal to feel that way. What I did in the process, is write letters to myself. I never wanted to forget how I felt because it would help me later on in life. I was questioning if writing a post about this was a good idea. I am no one. And I like motivation but would hate to sound like a cheap version of Anthony Robbins. About me I got in this year at my fourth trial. I was granted a single interview and rejected everywhere else. It was my first interview. I am not different form all of you and I got in. I am a normal student. I am not smart. I just try my best and try to forget about the rest. You're more than a medical school acceptance or rejection Challenges come along all the time, may they be medical or not. Resilience, persistence and dedication are traits that can be developed. In my case, I was trying to become a better person. I improved myself and that could have been useful in every circumstance. Had I decided to go into healthcare management, financial services, etc. Sure, rejections letter meant I wasn't fit for medical school. But no one could take away the skills I had developed and the experiences I gained. The best way to prevent regrets is to give your best today For me, there are 2 types of rejections : Rejected while knowing I did not do my best : leads to regrets Rejected while knowing that I did my best: no regrets at all This year, I was ready for the second type of rejection. So all I can tell you guys is : just do your best. If you truly give everything you have, then you can be proud and happy. Control what you can control. The increasing competition and the decreased amount of seats : you can't control at all. Your GPA, your MCAT score, your pre-req scores : all in your hands. You can still change your mind and that is not a failure I think that medicine is not for everyone. Some amazing potential doctors become public health researchers, lawyers, entrepreneurs, etc. And they leave a trace on our society that exceeds what most doctors did. Don't give up because they refused to give you a spot. BUT accept that there there are other ways to make an impact. If you decide to move on because you discover another passion : it is fine and you should be proud. It is not a failure. It is a decision. We can have more than one passion in life. It's not a one size fits all world. Just be sure you are making that decision because you want to : not because a letter forced you to. Everything you are feeling is normal and we all felt i So I said earlier that I used to write letters to myself when I was tired. It is very personal but here is one that I wrote about a month ago. I wrote it after the interviews when I was reading about the statistics. Let's just say the numbers are not very encouraging. Just to show you that you are not alone in this. I'm not even making that up. Just try to be the best version of yourself Remember that everyone that got in, every current resident and practicing physician, everyone encountered obstacles. That is also true for plumbers, janitors, lawyers, cashiers and engineers. It is part of life. Don't try to become a better doctor thinking it will make you a better person. Do your best, be the best version of yourself regardless of medical school. THAT will make you a better doctor. Good luck to all !
  6. 18 points
    Hey guys. This is Ana Safavi, the resident referred to in the articles. I did used to post here under a different username, but right before I went public, I sort of panicked and asked to be perma-banned from the forums in order to delete my entire post history. I don't think you can un-perma-ban a user, so here I am under a new profile. Oh well. I debated whether or not to post in this thread. Initially I stayed off premed 101, because I didn't want people to feel inhibited from discussing my case freely amongst themselves, for fear of offending me or something like that. Please don't worry about hurting my feelings -- trust me, I have been called way worse in the comment sections of the Sudbury Star and National Post by now. I wouldn't have gone public if I didn't have a thick skin, and I want people to feel like they can criticize me in this thread if they want. The reason I am posting in this thread is because I want people to know that I am available to help anyone else going through something similar. Medical student or resident. Male or female. Harassed -- sexually or otherwise. Unfairly targeted, discredited, silenced, or maligned by your institution. Whether you want advice, referrals to (non-shitty) lawyers, or just want to vent to somebody who gets it, I'm here and happy to help in any way that I can. I have learned so much over the past two years about how to navigate the system and protect yourself as a learner trapped in a broken, corrupt system, and I feel obligated to pass on that knowledge to anyone else who can benefit from that hard-earned insight. And my schedule is wide open right now. If you are afraid to put your thoughts in writing, my cell phone number is 519-859-9334. Text me anytime. Or you can add me on whatsapp. Just please no unsolicited d*ck pics (unintentional side effect of going public, I have recently learned). Btw, feel free to ask me questions. Don't worry about prying -- if I can't answer something for legal reasons, I'll let you know. The articles are a bit confusing, and some of my actions may seem somewhat illogical as a result. I will do my best to clarify things (like why I haven't released the name of my sexual harasser). You can also ask me personal questions if you like (what it felt like being sexually harassed, how to cope with something like that, etc). I will let you know if I don't want to answer and I promise not to be offended that you asked. Finally, if people want to discuss what it's like from the accused person's perspective (issues of due process, etc) I have some insight to offer as well there. After all, I was unfairly accused and punished by NOSM for making so-called 'unfounded accusations' after a one-sided investigation done without my knowledge, so while I am a victim here, I do have sympathy for the other side of the issue as well. Due process is paramount, and should never be sacrificed out of expediency.
  7. 17 points
    Time Stamp: April 12, 2:00PM With tears in my eyes... ACCEPTED!!!!!!!! (OOP WL) GPA: 3.9 MCAT: 515 Essay: I tried my hardest on this section bc im not very confident in my essay writing but ended up having to rush it more than I thought I would have to due to work. Weakest section by far really recommend taking extra time on this!! ECs: Research for a couple of years in Biology and Humanities (no pubs but impact was significant curriculum changes to 2 large uni courses), curriculum design assistant (published 2 interactive books), digital media assistant (mostly videography), undergrad TA for 2 terms,1300+ hrs of paid mentorship and tutoring, Crohns/Colitis volunteer, some unique placement experiences, cofounder of a startup. Interview: First interview of my life so I had a lot of trouble sleeping the night before. I felt like most of the sections were okay, 2 stations I felt really good on, but there was a station I completely bombed because I didnt read the prompt correctly and there wasn't enough time to save it. My total score was 77.63 I am a non-trad applicant and ive worked through so many failures and uncertainties its hard to describe how amazing this feels. I was put on academic probation after first year because I couldn't handle this idea of trying to out-compete my peers, the anxiety was too much and I was too scared to reach out for help. It took a break from uni for 1.5 years for me to be able to face my fears and accept being vulnerable/reaching out for help. I told myself that if this didn't happen for me this year, I would have to start pursuing a realistic backup. At a time where my family has been struggling, being able to call my momma and update her with this is unbelievable. This process almost feels like its designed to test your constitution constantly, I can't tell you how many times I nearly gave up. Don't let the process make you forget your own intrinsic value in this world, we all mean so much more than an application!!!
  8. 16 points
  9. 16 points
    Result: Accepted Geography: OOP GPA: 3.96 MCAT: 508 (129 CARS) <--Yes, you can get in with a low MCAT as an OOP! Degree: Bachelors of Commerce (2012) (No science prereqs) E.C: Non-trad applicant. Years of work experience in Investment Banking, Travel Agency. My volunteering activities are mainly cultural or entrepreneurship related. Won some top-level business awards. Black belt in Taekwondo. Grew up working on a farm. Traveled to over 35 countries. Fitness Mentor/Advocate. (No research at all) Interview: Felt most prepared for the U of A interview as it was my last of 3. The questions were more straightforward than UBC or McMaster. I really, really enjoyed the panel. I felt like I finally had a chance to talk about myself and show my personality. The panel interviewers were very nice and conversational as well. I felt iffy on the MMI. On 2-3 stations I did blah and the rest of I did okay. I think my ECs and Panel Interview really pulled through for me. I'm just so grateful right now to have received this opportunity. As I am writing this, I still can't believe it. After 6 years of contemplation, denial, and self-doubt, I finally now get the chance to become a doctor. When I found out that the results were released on this forum, I was at my desk at work. I literally just got up and ran out the door. I nervously tried to login to my account and ended up keying my password wrong 3 times. To avoid getting locked out, I had to call my fiancee to check my result on my home laptop where the password was already saved. When he read the admission decision to me over the phone, I crumbled to my knees and started crying. It was an unbelievable moment. I felt all the worry, pain, and doubt just wash away. I'm sure everyone that walked past me thought I was crazy. But I didn't care. This was the best day of my life. We are, at any moment, capable of pursuing our dreams. - The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho If medicine is your dream, don't give up. Never, ever give up.
  10. 15 points
    IMislove

    Queens Waitlist 2018

    ACCEPTED OFF THE Wait LIST OMFG FRIGGGG YESSSSS IVE WAITED 5 long OMSAS cycles for this shit yeaaaaaaasss. Thank you everyone for the support and memes. Will edit later.
  11. 15 points
    sna

    What is everybody using at med school?

    I've tried both and found that the iPad Pro has better hardware (Apple Pencil, longer battery, better display) and software (Notability, and although the surface has desktop Microsoft office with full features, I prefer the simpler mobile versions). With the iPad Pro, I was torn between using Notability vs OneNote. Notability has superior annotation, functional auto-sync to pdf, OneNote has better organization, infinite scroll in both x and y planes. So rather than choosing a compromise, I've ended up using both: Notability for in-class notes and OneNote for studying. Let me demonstrate what that looks like: Downloading the pdf/lecture file is easier on iPad (vs laptops) because you open it in the browser and tap "Open in Notability". This iniates multiple steps at once; it downloads the file, opens it in Notability, creates a pdf back-up in google drive that gets updated in real time as you take notes. All with one click. After class you get this: Then after class, you just tap the share button on the top left corner and with one tap save it in OneNote. Later when you're studying, you'll have room the ability to add additional subpages if necessary (Notability doesn't have this, see example below) and make additional comments/add resources on the side (see example below). You can also still annotate further: This system has worked beautifully for me so far. Let me know if you have any questions!
  12. 14 points
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency. You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions. So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  13. 14 points
    I finally got the call from Western yesterday!!!!! I was on high waitlist!!! Ahhhhh!! I am so happy.
  14. 14 points
    Ergomed

    Médecine 2018

    Admise, marché du travail. Je suis si heureuse!!!!!! Croyez en vos rêves. Je n'avais jamais osé appliquer avant cette année, convaincue que je ne faisais pas le poids, mais à ma grande surprise, je suis acceptée. Cote : 31,432 MEM : 597,200
  15. 13 points
    Can't believe I finally get to post this... TIME STAMP: May 8, 8:43AM RESULT: ACCEPTED GPA: 3.94 MCAT: 515 ECs: Working RN, research, health-related volunteering, some RN-related provincial awards. GEOGRAPHY: IP INTERVIEW: Walking out I felt like I killed it, but as time went by I started doubting my answers. To those who are still trying, don't give up! I did 9 years of undergrad including 1st/2nd degrees to get to this point; if you want it bad enough you'll find a way eventually!
  16. 13 points
  17. 13 points
    Monocyte

    uOttawa Interview 2018 Discussion

    *knows survey is anonymous* YES I LOVED IT, THANK YOU FOR EXCELLENT EXPERIENCE, UR ALL GREAT XD <3
  18. 13 points
    egg

    uOttawa Interview 2018 Discussion

    Well that post-interview survey email just gave me a heart attack
  19. 13 points
    Posting for the first time hopefully to give others hope, particularly OOP's with underwhelming stats. I know that this may not be a perfectly representative sample of all applicants, but I've checked this website for a long time and have often been overwhelmed by the stats of others. TIME STAMP: Mon Mar 26th @ 10:09pm (Checked Minerva for the first time around 12:30 and it was up) Result: Accepted Region: OOP Year: Graduated Masters in 2016, Undergrad in 2014 cGPA: 3.87, pre-reqGPA: 3.86 MCAT: 510 (125/127/127/131) - Again pretty underwhelming but I contacted the admissions office directly and they from what they said submitting your MCAT can only help you. For post interview (80% MMI, 20% prereq) if you submit your MCAT they calculate your prereq score using 1) just your courses and 2) using courses and MCAT at 50:50 (their words). They then take the higher of the two. Unless your MCAT is atrocious I can't see why submitting it would hurt. ECs: I've always tried to do things I loved and not for the sake of boosting my resume. Not criticizing anyone of doing the latter but had been advised to take this approach by many people in the medical field early on in my university career and I think it boded well for my personal development and growth. I have one first author pub submitted, 3 conference presentations, captain of a varsity rugby team, a few big scholarships and grants, 4 pretty diverse medical placements that involved patient contact (more for my own understanding of if this is what I wanted to pursue), a couple service trips abroad, and a few other odds and ends. Interview Prep: I probably over prepared but knew that was what I needed to do to feel my best. I do think running through MMI situations and practicing them out loud can be incredibly helpful, especially doing it with a variety of people to get a variety of feedback. Also knowing yourself, the experiences you've had and what you've learned I think can be really valuable. I had an awesome girl in Med-1 give me some guidance and advice for how to prepare, in addition to showing me around the school the day before my interview. I'm not in the program yet so it's hard for me to know, but based on what she said and my impression - McGill really cares about who you are as a person and how you interact with other people, especially at the interview stage. The best advice she gave me was to relax and be yourself and if you can walk out of the interview feeling like you did that then you have nothing to regret. Everyone is going to feel like there are little things they would've done differently - that's normal in challenging and time constrained situations. It's been 8 years since I started undergrad. I went straight from undergrad to a masters and applied to 3 schools without the MCAT for 2016 (including McGill) and was granted 0 interviews. Took a year off and worked and wrote the MCAT and reapplied to all the schools I met the cut-off criteria for across the country this time (10 schools). I got 9 outright rejections and one interview waitlist (at McGill). Was pulled off the waitlist 2 weeks before interviews (which I would think means I was pretty close to the bottom of the barrel) and was lucky enough to be in the 10 selected on Monday. This doesn't mean I'm imploring you to never give up. If I was rejected that would've been it for me, my physiotherapy pre-requisites are all expiring after this year and I wanted to start moving forward with the schooling process and my life in general. I get both sides of that discussion. Perhaps this message can be hopeful for one person though, and if that's the case I'll happy I did it. So so excited for the opportunity. See y'all in August.
  20. 12 points
    Guest0

    Med 2018

    -
  21. 12 points
    SpeedyPotato

    2018 Waitlist Discussions

    Today was my lucky day, I wish you all the best of luck, you guys are wonderful people well deserving of having the career you want. It took me 6 years to get it, never give up guys!!!
  22. 12 points
    Egg_McMuffin

    Queens Waitlist 2018

    I got in!!!!
  23. 12 points
    Jfourn

    Waitlist Support Thread - 2018

    I got in. I was expecting a call and checked my email after seeing someone on here post that they had an email and no call. I'm still in shock. 3.955 GPA. For those looking at the timestamp stuff, go back last year, we did the same thing and it doesn't mean anything. Edited: My timestamp was 7:45am. I know it looks like this is the case this year, but go back to our discussion last year and you can see that the pattern eventually breaks.
  24. 12 points
    helicase

    Queens Waitlist 2018

    ACCEPTED OFF THE WAITLIST OMG. surreal, I'm shaking May 22; 11:07am PST
  25. 12 points
    I can’t believe this. I got in. I’m outside the office on my knees and crying. Everyone thinks I’m crazy. This is the best day of my life.
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