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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/30/2018 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    la marzocco

    Why do you want to be a doctor?

    I think many people go into medicine for many reasons, inclusive of those you had mentioned. End of the day, one needs to be satisfied with one's choice. Those factors you had mentioned can be accessory or main reasons for one's entry into medicine, but who is to say they won't end up enjoying it? Many of my friends went into medicine for a multitude of reasons, again inclusive of those you had mentioned, and all have become very competent and caring doctors and are very satisfied with the path they chose. By virtue of being a doctor, one has privileges and obligations to society. That is basically it. Who are we to judge anyone's particular motivation(s)?
  2. 4 points
    bruh

    Interview experience?

    Exactly my reaction. I went in ready for a fun interview filled with a healthy amount of personal questions. And it turned out to be anything but that. I felt like the interview was awkward and lacked flow. If you are just going to ask a bunch of random questions, then do it as an MMI so the process is at least more reliable.
  3. 4 points
    Edict

    The Perfect Clerk

    I would say: Be keen - say yes, don't argue or talk back, respect that there is a hierarchy and this varies by specialty with surgery being the most hierarchical and family medicine being less so. Work hard - If you want a letter, you need to stay late, always be on time or early, (for electives, you should work weekends, do extra call (varies by specialty)). Never leave work for others unless they absolutely insist on doing it for you/doing it themselves. (if you want to be a superstar on an elective, take on work for residents (in a tasteful and appropriate way), residents don't need to impress in the same timeframe you do, most will recognize your effort and they will return the favour) Be knowledgeable - Know your clinical stuff, the knowledge you need for Step 2 CK is more important than knowledge you learn in Step 1. Be socially aware - This is important. Medicine is teamwork, always pay attention to those around you. If you are in rounds and you start some 10 minute long discussion about which ACEi to use with your staff, look around, your fellow teammates may be rolling their eyes, falling asleep or shaking their leg. Be friendly/nice/sociable - This I find is often very innate, some have no trouble others do, however the most important thing in my mind is don't be the opposite. As long as you are polite, can make some conversation and can laugh at a preceptor's jokes (even if you it was an awkward joke and it wasn't that funny) you will do fine in this category. This is a category you just need to be okay at, excelling is the icing on the cake but not the base. Two important mindsets to apply during clerkship: 1. Function at the level of a junior resident - As you advance through clerkship, watch your junior residents closely, watch what they do, how they act. Pick the one you think does the best job in your eyes and try to work, think and act like them. Try to start doing responsibilities that they do. Try to have as much knowledge as them. 2. Put the team first - On a rotation you want to impress in, think about the team first. Make sure the team's job is done or accounted for before you go home each day. Be willing to "take one for the team" and eventually "the team will take one for you".
  4. 3 points
    Mr.otter

    Admissions Médecine 2018

    La différence est que Laval dévoile ses étalons de manière honnête ce qui évite aux gens de gaspiller leur argent en appliquant pour un processus qui considère qu'il est impossible qu'une personne inscrite dans son programme universitaire ait la capacité intellectuelle et psychologique pour devenir médecin.
  5. 2 points
    Aloès

    Admissions Médecine 2018

    Tiens-nous au courant (si tu veux)! Je trouve ça vraiment étrange/ridicule.
  6. 2 points
    Mr.otter

    Admissions Médecine 2018

    Je ne sais pas, je commence par leur demander des explications a savoir pourquoi j'ai reçu une lettre disant que je n'ai pas un dossier scolaire compétitif alors que j'ai une moyenne de 4.3, car selon moi ce n'est pas moins que de la fraude. On verra ensuite
  7. 2 points
    kenjuro

    Convocations entrevues MD 2018

    Oh mon dieu et moi qui pensait que ça allait sortir le 3 avril... Bon je ne pourrai pas décrocher du forum ajd... Désolé pour ceux avec les refus...il ne faut pas abandonner si c'est ce que vous désirez vraiment !!! (je suis rendu à ma 4ème tentative...)
  8. 2 points
    senotspets

    Post-Refusal

    excelspreadsheet, kleck096, and lmck; Thank you all! You're right. I feel much better after having some time to process over the last couple of days. Thanks so much for the kind words!
  9. 2 points
    buttercream

    Official May 8 Countdown Thread

    I tried this approach but my mom and S/O ended up telling basically everyone I know... now I am dreading the "so did you get in??" conversations with everyone come May if things don't turn out well.
  10. 2 points
    This is really important. When I've done the test myself, I've received answers giving various personality types, but I recently tried a predictive tool based on social media analysis - and it gave a completely different type of personality (despite the name of the link - it's affiliated with Cambridge. As a bonus it does an analysis of the big 5 types as well): https://applymagicsauce.com I think different aspects of personality can come into conflict with themselves - i.e. more thinking/judging vs sensing/feeling.. etc. However, I do know all aspects of my personality currently believe that doing med school in a 2nd language, without full linguistic ability, was possibly an error, as the personal/psychological/emotional price has been too high and the thinking/judging believes that I'll never be able to reach my own potential in terms of performance and thus be permanently frustrated. This is with the full realization that med school may never have happened and that upon admission I had no real indication that 2nd language can be such a barrier to excelling.
  11. 2 points
    ysoNaCly

    Help? Uoft Waitlist vs. UCC

    This is how I see it. Since UofTs offers came out so early this year that means almost everyone accepted right away because they most likely had no other offers. So right now it looks like the wait list isn't going to move but the reality is there is no reason for it to move right now. Also there is only 1 waitlist this year meaning IP and OOP applicants are all on the same list. The past two years the IP waitlist moved 31 spots alone and the OOP around 7. I don't see why this year the waitlist wouldn't get to the early 20's at least, especially once all other offers start coming out particularly the med school acceptances in May.
  12. 1 point
    Haribo7173

    Why do you want to be a doctor?

    God forbid people go into medicine to help people?!?!
  13. 1 point
    Al22

    Convocations entrevues MD 2018

    En 2016 ils m'ont calculé 30.3 (je n'avais pas de bonus dans ce temps là)
  14. 1 point
    Edict

    Why do you want to be a doctor?

    "Personally, my GPA is high enough for admission to all med schools except U of T (and it was as early as 2014). But for the reasons listed above, I choose not to go to med school. However, I do like to help people, but just not as a doctor." - This, my friend, is music to an interviewer's ears
  15. 1 point
    MDLaval

    Why do you want to be a doctor?

    Agree. I was 8 when I decided I wanted to be a doctor. And it was because my grandmother had cancer. All she and my family went through, the help and the support we had from physicians, and several other reasons, made me decide at such a young age what I wanted to do later as a career.
  16. 1 point
    Butterfly_

    Why do you want to be a doctor?

    I think 95% is too high of a number for your listed reasons. People choose to pursue medicine for a variety of reasons. Though they may the ones that you mentioned, some other examples could be: -they had a serious illness which inspired them -ailing family member -passion to discover new cures -inspired by a doctor etc. I’ve met many many doctors who did not enter medicine due to your listed reasons. Many are selfless and inspiring. Also, many applicants spend years applying to medical schools, averaging 3 or more tries per applicant. I’m sure the superficial reasons (except to help people) you listed would not give someone enough extrinsic motivation and resilience to endure this grueling application process. Wish you the best on your own journey.
  17. 1 point
    Kiki-Mora

    Admissions Médecine 2018

    je suis d"accord avec vous, je trouve que le processus d'admission en med du Quebec vraiment n'est pas ausse transparent. Moi j'ai ete refusee parce que mes preambles sont pas sufficents. Mais l'autre uni les considere ok.
  18. 1 point
    PhD2MD

    Rise in competition last 5 years

    1. More people are playing the GPA "game" 2. McMaster Health Sci
  19. 1 point
    SarahP

    Nutrition 2018

    Moi aussi j'ai recu mon offre hier finalement !
  20. 1 point
    indefatigable

    Rise in competition last 5 years

    According to this forum, the UofT entering avg for medicine in 2001 was about 3.84 (I'm assuming that's the weighted average). There's multiple processes occurring though: i) people are more aware of the importance of GPA and thus optimizing their course choices to maximize their avg; ii) there is continuous grade inflation - i.e. more people receive higher grades than in the past, for various reasons; iii) there has been an increase in applicants per seat - i.e. more competition: from 9.1 in 2000 to 12.1 in 2017 at UofT.
  21. 1 point
    heyhellohi

    Interview experience?

    This is literally the most accurate way to describe that interview and what it could’ve been instead.
  22. 1 point
    SpeedyPotato

    2018 Waitlist Discussions

    I feel you.. I am not complaining at 14, but I'm still not sure it gets to me either with less places this year. After all of this, I'm struggling to go back to normal.
  23. 1 point
    Calopee

    Convocations entrevues MD 2018

    Donne-moi pas trop d'espoir....
  24. 1 point
    Al22

    Convocations entrevues MD 2018

    Refus (prévisible, j'ai appliqué juste pour avoir ma cote...). Contingent bacc connexe complété. 8/10 à uOttawa en sciences biomed + bonus maîtrise + bonus 15 credits à UdeM. Je vous informe de la cote que ça donne dès que je la reçois. Bonne chance à ceux qui sont encore dans la course !
  25. 1 point
    LivieK

    UBC MOT Interview

    @DenisOTHopefull THANK YOU. It's good to connect with you! My friend who's currently in the program said that a handful of waitlisted folks got in last year, so I'm hoping for the best. Now it's just a matter of waiting...
  26. 1 point
    Eudaimonia

    Verifier language problems

    If you apply to Ontario schools through OMSAS, there is a Note section you could use to state that the verifier has limited English skills. Alberta allows 2 verifiers for each activity so you could put someone less involved with you but more comfortable with English. Some schools will contact you if they can't get a hold of the verifier (UBC I think) and then you could explain. Generally, I don't think it should be a problem as it sounds like a reasonable situation.
  27. 1 point
    Mr.otter

    Admissions Médecine 2018

    Non, je suis québécois et j'étudie dans une université québécoise...
  28. 1 point
    vcklo

    McMaster campuses

    Hi, I'm graduating from the Niagara campus this year. I ranked it last 3 years ago because I didn't know anything about it, no connections. I'm originally from Toronto, only knew the city life. If I were to go back in time, I would be happy to do it all over again in Niagara... I got an appreciation for life in the community that I otherwise would not have. As ppl have said, there are pros and cons... here are a couple of things I liked though: I do think you'll probably have more research opportunities in Hamilton, but it would be incorrect to say you won't have good or any research opportunities at the regional campus. The staff (and there's dedicated research staff) are incredibly supportive and want you to succeed (ie publish) because it helps their research program too. I found I got the support I needed to publish and present in time for carms. I was and still am planning on being involved in academics in my career and successfully matched to a program in a big city, so I didn't feel held back in that regard. Anytime I had electives, I did them outside of Niagara since all my cores were in Niagara. I would say what I really liked about Niagara is the 1-on-1 relationship/teaching you have with staff... there's basically no hierachy you find at other institutions where you're at the "bottom", then the junior residents, senior residents, fellows, then staff.... it's just you the student and the staff. I personally found this really helpful when asking them to write me reference letters since we spent so much face-time together. For what it's worth, the last two years Niagara had a 100% match rate for residency. It was slightly annoying to have to move after MF1, but after settling in a month later, it was great. I'm paying $900/mo for 900 square feet, which I'm going to miss. I think having a car is pretty necessary in Niagara. I'll leave it there for now.
  29. 1 point
    Maggie19

    HELP!! Flight issues

    I didn't message Chantal in the end. I read what @GITG said and it made so much sense ; I was so preoccupied with my situation that I wasn't thinking clearly. I really think it would have been a mistake and I would regretted doing it. So thank you for that
  30. 1 point
    adri27

    Interview experience?

    I hate MMIs so much and I feel like you leave the interview feeling they hardly got to know you, so I was so excited to finally get a more traditional interview where I can talk about my accomplishments, my qualities, my aspirations etc. After years of soul crushingly slogging through MMIs, where no matter how much I practice I'm destined for a waitlist, I was finally amped for an interview. I practiced for about a month, giving a sample answer to my wall for every practice question I could find. But this is the year they basically turned it into panel MMIs. I don't know what to think anymore.
  31. 1 point
    markup

    Official May 8 Countdown Thread

    Two interviews is awesome! Now you know what those are like - it's really different to live through them compared to reading/hearing about them second hand. Even in the worst case, you'll have a year to explore your interests and improve your application (and you're already a competitive applicant since you received interviews this round) for the better. If it comes down to it, the additional experience and maturity you'll have will further boost your application. Of course, I hope you get awesome news in May so you won't have to worry about this process again
  32. 1 point
    Eudaimonia

    Official May 8 Countdown Thread

    In the worst case that you don't get accepted, I'm sure you have learned a lot about the process and yourself this cycle. You'll improve for next cycle and having received interviews at these 2 schools gives me an idea that you're a strong applicant. I have faith you will make it, if not this year then the next
  33. 1 point
    erilaz

    Advice needed

    I can't speak on most of what you've mentioned, but for your last point: I don't think adcoms really care. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure it really held you back, but "emotional drama" is extremely common for pre-meds and I'm sure they hear it all the time. At the end of the day, they want people who will preferably be able to maintain a high GPA even with that emotional wreckage going on in their lives, because med school will be very difficult otherwise.
  34. 1 point
    housecalle

    UBC MOT Interview

    Hey DenisOTHopefull, I'm also on the waitlist currently, albeit a bit below you guys, could you also possibly let me know as well if you get an offer? Thanks
  35. 1 point
    hey all i just had to share my experience because i am a non-traditional non-traditional non-traditional medical student! or future medical student - i got my acceptance a month ago and i'm starting this fall. i am 39 years old, a parent, a PhD graduate who did a humanities PhD (and a humanities masters, and a humanities undergrad). I've been working as a postdoctoral researcher for 3 years, and got myself into some occupational health and safety research, but otherwise i've entirely been a theorist whose focussed more on philosophy than on data. i bombed my first two years of undergrad, dropped out for 3 years, and then went back to school. after my masters i worked internationally at women's rights organisations for a couple years, then with women's organisations in canada for a couple years, then a PhD (in philosophy of technology, basically). throughout my phd i felt uncertain about what i was doing. i wanted to go back to working in women's organisations and internationally, but felt like i didn't have much to offer without specific training. i love research, but missed working with people. i have NEVER, EVER, in all my years of post secondary education, taken a science course. NONE. i began studying for the MCAT in 2015, entirely self taught. bought a book called Organic Chemistry as a Second Language which I cannot recommend enough. i did abysmally on my first MCAT and wasn't invited anywhere for an interview. I did better on my second MCAT, got an interview, and just received my acceptance. seriously - i self-taught myself science, while working full time on research and raising a kid. i have mediocre cGPA because of two bad years in undergrad. i have no science back ground. i am (relatively) old. AND I GOT IN! if i can do it you can. i am so excited. this is a dream come true. every day i pinch myself because i feel like i am so lucky to be allowed to study medicine and one day be a doctor and care for patients and do meaningful work that incorporates both research and working with people. seriously: if any of you out there doubt yourselves please contact me because i got in and so can you!
  36. 1 point
    lmck

    Post-Refusal

    Honestly.. to get an OOP spot at McGill is like winning the lottery. I am exaggerating, but it is probably the worst odds in all admission categories across all Canadian schools.
  37. 1 point
    kleck096

    Post-Refusal

    If you're interviewing OOP (especially at McGill), think about the caliber of students you're up against - this is much stiffer competition than IP streams anywhere else.
  38. 1 point
    Did anyone want to meet up and practice for MMI?
  39. 1 point
    Lactic Folly

    Dating Profiles

    A nanny in addition to a stay-at-home spouse? You could live like this, but you wouldn't be able to retire for a long time, which may or may not bother them, haha.
  40. 1 point
    MDmaybe99

    Post-Refusal

    i love this support group, i wish we could all meet up at a bar, have a drink and cry all together
  41. 1 point
    dreamteam22

    Post-Refusal

    DON'T WE ALL! This is my 5th application, 2nd interview, 2nd straight up refusal post-interview. It happens. It's pretty sad, and you may feel empty, powerless, and feel like you want to cry - do it if it helps, otherwise just binge watch The Office and focus on what you can do to improve next year . Do whatever you can to get through this period, but before you know it, you'll be filling in that excel workbook in September and Ready for Review.
  42. 1 point
    Thanks a lot for checking up! Drive was fine except I should have brought ski goggles because the snow was blinding haha. I found my UofS interview went better than UofA but we shall see.. Thanks for all the updates and recommendations
  43. 1 point
    indefatigable

    [deleted]

    I can see your point of view, and I think honestly at the end of the day it's your decision completely, should you be fortunate to receive multiple offers. Others may think like you, since if I recall correctly the OOP waitlist moves fairly quickly for McGill. I think other posters are simply suggesting to be open-minded about a potential opportunity at McGill.
  44. 1 point
    FiftyshadesofMD

    [deleted]

    My two cents: In Canada and given the fierce competition, the best medical school is the one you get into !
  45. 1 point
    Ah the famous Schulich curriculum. I'll give an overview as to how first year is so you have an idea of what we've done so far. So we start off in first year with a course called Core Biology from September to October that brings everyone in the class on the same playing field. It covers topics such as Microbio, anatomy, physiology, head and neck, immunology, and some dental intro topics in saliva and mineralization. We also have Ethics and Biomaterials running concurrently till December. From October till January, we take the "General Medicine" Block courses which include gross anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology and general medicine. Its structured such that you have anatomy on Monday, physiology on Tuesday, pathology on Wednesday, pharmacology on Thursday and General medicine on Friday. FYI, general medicine brings together all the material you learned throughout the week into one case-based course to learn how to think like a practitioner (medical management of dental patients). It runs like this for each system (cardio, resp, renal, etc.) where we have midterms in December and finals in January. Dental Anatomy and Oral Histology also starts in October and continue till December and February respectively. You start wax ups in sim clinic in dental anatomy which is fun! Essentially, you have 10 courses running simultaneously from October to December and 12 exams in December. In late January-Early Feb, you have 9 exams for the remaining courses. Its not the most attractive part of Schulichs curriculum but it has a lot of upside to it. In first year, we do pharmacology and general medicine (I know some schools take pharm in second year) so that we start thinking like practitioners before even going up into the main clinic. Not all schools take a course in general medicine but I feel the material that we learn in that course really prepares us to diagnose and learn medical management in depth. Also, our sim clinic is state of the art, newly renovated and worth every dollar. Its nice being able to spend time in a space that has new materials and equipment instead of the old sim clinic which doesn't even compare to what we have now! Also, Schulich has fewer grad departments (ortho, oral surg) so students in upper years get more cases sent to them from what I've heard while shadowing them. The small class is a benefit since we're all tight knit, have intramural teams and go out together as a class! Of course every school isn't perfect and has their issues but I've been pretty happy so far here. @longhaul and @Waves can fill in anything I've missed but if you have any specific questions, let me know!
  46. 1 point
    I was a lawyer prior to going into medical school. Although I am not married nor have any children, I still count it as a bit of a sacrifice. I was making comfortable income and I had no debt and was saving for a downpayment. I was even up for promotion during the year I was admitted to medical school. It was a tough pill to swallow to have to go back to school and be a student again (incurring debt, time, effort, etc.). I found the transition to be smoother than I had imagined though. I too was worried, but at the end of the day, you need to satisfy yourself with the fact that you did all you could to accomplish your life goals. This involves planning and talking with your husband. How did he take it - I imagine he was/is supportive of you? I did a few things before I accepted my offer: look at my personal finances to see how much I anticipate these 4 four years will entail - tuition, cost of living, etc. How much provincial aid I would receive (e.g., I am from Ontario so OSAP)? In your case, maybe look at your family's finances? I also thought hard and deep about why medicine. It was a bigger question for me because had I stayed in law, it was pretty much going to be easy sailing.. work hard, get promoted, become partner at law firm, etc. There is going to be a significant trade-off and opportunity cost - income and time forgone. But, some will argue in the forum that these are inconsequential if you goal is to be a doctor. But I found myself to be in a more unique situation and these costs merited analysis. For me, it really came down to, I always wanted to do medicine since a young age and it was the time to go for it.. I found the decision to be worth it (till this point at lease! ha) Lastly, be supportive of yourself. There will always be obstacles and difficult times - you will have to find time for your children and husband - these are realities. My challenges may be different from yours, but it all boils down to managing life and work. If there is a will there is a way. You need to want this badly enough. Happy to chat more through DM, but good luck and all the best with the app!
  47. 1 point
    Time for Mr Ducks post! First of all as someone who stalked this forum for 7-8 years, it is such a blessed feeling to be able to put in my very own entry I hope you little ducklings can learn from these posts and never give up! Trust: this is soooo worth. Accepted Date Stamp: Tuesday May 9, 2017 at 7:28 AM Location: Ottawa Stream: French wGPA: 3.991 Current year: 3rd year ECs: This is kind of copy paste from my interview invite post but I will elaborate a little bit more. Long term hospital volunteering (5-6 years the general campus TOH, doing patient care on wards, cancer center, and lately working with volunteer association as their board member/secretary, 3 years at Montfort as ER volunteer and training new ER volunteers), President and co-founder of research club 2 years organizing case competitions on campus (Scinapse, etc), promoting research opportunities etc. Research in one lab since 4 years with 1 pub (6th author), 2 abstracts (first author) and oral presentation award at one of those meetings. URS scholarship recipient, lifeguard/lifesaving instructor for couple of years, work as medicine unit clerk at Montfort as well as nutrition clerk and nutrition aide (yep, serving patients food, twas fun), got 2 pronvinvical volunteer awards etc. PM me if you have questions or want more details! For ECs, honestly do what you like and the path will follow itself. For example I did a coop at Montfort hospital in 11th grade, I met the director, he hooked up a volunteer position in the ER, then I started volunteering there, got enough experience to train volunteers, got nominated for an award (I work hard lol) and with volunteering at the hospital and meeting managers I was able to get hired at the nutrition department, moved myself up to be a unit clerk. Just goes to show that a simple start in a place you like, and some networking, will build opportunities by itself! And no need to do hospital (I loved the hospital so I naturally stuck there) but it can be anywhere. Interview: This is my honest opinion as I dont want to mess up the stats. I honestly had a bad feeling coming out. Although my friend right before me had said the panel was warm, laughing and answers were good, I did not have the same feeling at all. Panel was serious the whole time with me, I gave an answer that wasnt really me for the first 2 questions (I think they picked up on it) but I stayed calm and collected throughout. My approach to ethical scenarios was very solid, I think thats what redeemed me as I backed up with really relevant experiences within the hospital. 100% of the questions I got were ones you can read online (if I am allowed to say), nothing super crazy at all; very basic stuff! Had a bad feeling walking out, but I guess this is another proof that post-interview feelings dont always correlate with acceptance/rejection. For the interview, honestly be yourself (no joke). I realized this recently but imagine you look dishonest at the interview, would you want a dishonest physician interacting with a patient? There needs to be trust, intellect (thinking of your answer), etc. Think of being in the shoes of the interviewer... Thats it for me feel free to PM me hopefully I check the inbox regularly enough to answer any questions. Good luck to any future applicants
  48. 1 point
    Good waitlist ​Time: 7:38 AM GPA: 3.983 ​Stream: English ​ECs: Actually mediocre ​Interview: I thought it was a disaster, but in retrospect it wasn't quite THAT bad. See here. I DID however, forget my interview shoes. So I was in a nice suit, and after the interview a kind fellow interviewee pointed out, "Hey, nice Nike AFOs". Imagine the horror.
  49. 1 point
    Result: Accepted GPA: 87.9 (Best 2) IP/OOP: IP DAT (AA + PAT): 21,19 Interview: Felt good about it walking out. But took it hard on my self the next day and on. I thought I said some stupid stuff but really, I was just being myself. Year of study: 4th year undergrad (Just finished exams 2 days ago!) ABS/PS: Pretty good ABS/PS. Research. Please PM for details I literally can not believe it, feels like a dream. Don't be discouraged from your grades in your first year. Didn't do great that year. That summer, I spent some time reflecting on what I needed to change in my life in order to achieve what I wanted. Ladies and gents, stay at it, keep grinding. For the class of 2021, I look forward to meeting you all. For now, let's enjoy our summers!
  50. 1 point
    I'm also wondering which bank offers the best deal or if all professional line of credits are virtually the same? I was just talking with someone from Scotiabank re: the Scotia Professional Student Plan (SPSP). A condition of me being eligible is that I have to switch my credit card from a Scotiabank Value Visa (interest rate 11.99%) to a ScotiaGold Passport Visa (interest rate 19.99%). I was advised to use my credit card most of the time as it at least has a grace period for repayments versus the SPSP which accumulates interest as soon as you use it. Anyone have any insight on whether a different bank offers a competitive line of credit/professional loan without needing to have a credit card with a high interest rate?
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