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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/22/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Blasé

    CMA backpacks

    All the colours look decent BUT I swear to god, if they choose yellow, that bag is going straight into the trash...
  2. 2 points
    IMislove

    CMA backpacks

    The spicy orange and jalepeno red are acceptable for me, although brighter would have been nice haha. Emerald green ain’t the worst either.
  3. 2 points
    I wouldn't let job prospects rule you out of any specialties this early on in the game. Explore specialites based on your interest first because job prospects will change for every specialty between now and the time you actually finish training. However, with that being said, if you are someone who knows they are not interested in doing graduate degrees or fellowships, there are a few specialties where these are likely the defacto requirement going forward (i.e. neurosurgery, cardiac surgery, sub-specialty general surgery, academic sub-specialty IM). Much of this is part job market but also partly due to increasing standards and evidence in surgery/medicine. A lot of these job market discussions are much easier had once you know what you want. No one can predict the future on this forum, everything anyone will tell you is all hearsay and much of this information, by the time it trickles down to you, is years old, often rendering it obsolete.
  4. 2 points
    futurefamilydoc

    MD Financial 2018 Backpacks?

    Probably Scotiabank red
  5. 1 point
    ninja7292

    CMA backpacks

    https://www.cma.ca/En/Pages/medical-students.aspx
  6. 1 point
    Sissi

    working while in medschool?

    Hello, I want to have advice from someone who is in medschool or heard about someone in medschool. I would like to know if it is realistic to have a job while going in first year of medical school. I got accepted and now I have to think about either keeping my job during academic year or not. It is a job where I work saturday and sunday (8 hours) on the weekend. Thank you
  7. 1 point
    USDO and USMD are great because you are basically guaranteed to match to the US and you have a decent shot at matching to Canada if you want (for US MD). Matching to Canada is not that easy since you have to split your electives between Canada and the US and things can get competitive when you are trying to outmuscle CMGs for their own spots especially with the current shortage of residency spots. I believe US DOs are considered IMGs in the big provinces which means that you might have a harder time matching to Canada. Going to the US as a DO is mainly to ensure you match to a residency in the US. You can complete your residency in the US and still practice as a doctor in Canada (will be hard to find a job as an academic in certain more competitive locations though). If your goal is to match to residency in Canada, CMG > USMD >> USDO/Ireland/Aus > Caribbean. Anecdotally, most of the IMGs who match back to Canada are from Ireland with a reasonable but lesser number from Australia and the Caribbean or other IMG schools (e.g. Poland). Ive yet to meet a US DO who matched to residency in Canada although that could be due to the fact that most US DOs end up preferring to do residency in the US and the numbers going to US DO schools are smaller. If your goal is to just be a doctor in North America, CMG = USMD > USDO >> Caribbean/Ireland/Aus. The cold truth of medicine is that pedigree does matter. If you want a competitive specialty or a competitive location, going to any of these schools will make it more difficult. I've yet to meet a DO staff in an academic position in Canada although I have seen a few in the states. If you don't mind about all this nonsense and would be happy in community and/or are interested in a less competitive specialty, then you don't need to be as picky on trying to get into Canadian or US MD schools.
  8. 1 point
    Edict

    Orthopedic Surgery

    The job market for orthopedics is getting better now from what i've heard from graduating residents. All of this stuff is cyclical, choosing a specialty is a bit like choosing to buy a house in 10 years. The market could be booming or in a recession. Regarding your question, it seems as if Canadian FRCSC's can write the US boards. You just need to have finished your Canadian boards before you write the US ones. https://www.abos.org/certification-exams/part-i.aspx It also says below that you are eligible for board certification with Canadian residency training. https://www.abpsus.org/orthopedic-surgery-eligibility
  9. 1 point
    The iPad retails for $429. You can get the bank account without the LOC, but with the LOC you get the account fees waived without a minimum balance.
  10. 1 point
    I noticed that RBC is offering iPads this year for anyone who opens a new VIP account with them (which comes with their loc): https://www.rbcroyalbank.com/accounts/vip-banking.html. Not quite as nice as just straight cash, but probably of a similar value on resale. May be of interest to some who were leaning towards rbc for whatever reason. I signed up last year when the bonus was your choice of several other types of apple products (iWatch, iPhones). I recall some people saying their advisors told them they couldn’t get it with the student loc, but I didn’t have any problems — it just happened automatically without much effort on my part aside from making sure I did the qualifying steps.
  11. 1 point
    Any idea when the new limits are going to be announced?
  12. 1 point
    NLengr

    Employment opportunities of specialties

    ENT and urology are also tight on jobs. According to the last Royal College report anyway. Pretty much just assume that: 1. Any academic job will be hard to get 2. Any surgical job will be hard to get
  13. 1 point
    It's not automatic, get in touch with your advisor when the time comes.
  14. 1 point
    I would take Bambi's advice who has a lot of experience. I won't repeat what Bambi said but spending the time to study and fully devote your time to know the material is a lot more important than getting money, let alone the fact that you need to keep time aside for mental sanity. The weekends will basically be the only time you have to breathe. It would suck to take that away. I have so much more satisfaction with myself knowing I devoted myself to studying and achieving high grades. Anyone that tells you that grades don't matter in med school I would disagree with; yes they do matter and translate to a certain degree to clinical performance. Students that achieve lower grades in pre-clerkship perform worst on national exams and residency matching, it's a known fact. As much as I loved my job too, I know that I'd be able to do more for my patients if I perform my best during pre-clerkship. That's my take on it. You can always go back to your job in the summer if you wanted to (I actually did that and recently quit because I'd rather continue reading on pathophys and doing electives on the weekend!) Also, you'll make the money you missed out on in a few weeks as a physician lol. Mr Duck
  15. 1 point
    Edict

    Disappointed I'm Going to Windsor

    Windsor and other regional campuses can be at a disadvantage for the highly competitive specialties as well as the very niche tertiary specialties, it doesn't sink your chances but it could make it harder to match to your top choice or to match in general. However, most people don't end up wanting these specialties anyways so it really doesn't end up being a huge deal. However in your case, to me, distance to family and friends, cost of attendance, access to support are all huge factors and that would lead me to recommend you choosing the other school.
  16. 1 point
    GITG

    working while in medschool?

    For people who mentioned bursaries, are you talking about the grant portion of OSAP or Ottawa-specific bursaries? Because if I remember correctly, you can work up to certain # of hours/week without it affecting your OSAP funding (At least that is how it was in undergrad).
  17. 1 point
    Saskatoon USASK student who is quite familiar with Winnipeg - in terms of the city itself, Saskatoon is about 1/2 the size of Winnipeg so there's a bit less shopping/no IKEA that kind of stuff. It's still big enough to have pretty good amenities though (if you like sports the SK Rush play here lots and the SMA buys tickets for groups of students, movie theatres, OK shopping, pretty good restaurants considering the size of the city, lots of pubs but not a great "bar/club scene" if that's what you're into, beautiful river valley for walks/runs/canoe/kayaking). Crime-wise the area closest to the main teaching hospital RUH where you will attend all your lectures and most of your clerkship rotations is very safe, compared to the areas around Winnipeg's hospitals (again, this is my perception as someone who doesn't live in Winnipeg). But you will spend some rotations at St Pauls which is more of an inner city/"less safe" kind of neighborhood (never had issues myself, though). One thing you might want to consider is that there are less options for domestic and international flights out of S'toon. Can make for some shitty layovers. Whereas Winnipeg is bigger and obviously has a bigger airport. In terms of the program I would imagine they're fairly equivalent both being prairie schools. A little less academic, a little more opportunity for independent clinical decision making and procedural skills practice. Overall my experience at the U of S has been pretty good and I don't have a lot of complaints. Any complaints I have are super typical based on chats with med students from all over the country. We all have to deal with the same BS at some point, basically. The main negatives for Saskatoon would be: parking around RUH/College of medicine buildings (there is none, or if there is it's $3/hr pay parking; across the main road from campus for about a 6-8 block radius it's only 2 hr free parking, and unlimited free parking is usually found 10 blocks away); construction - this will be getting better soon, but they're renovating the health sciences building which cuts down on the spaces for pre-clerkship students to hang out; split campus classes - as you know, the class is split after 1st year into regina and saskatoon... this makes for some technical difficulties at time during lectures when broadcasting isnt working (dedicated tech people for CoM classes though so it's usually dealt with quickly), weirdness for planning social events, and a pretty disjointed class overall with sometimes very different experiences at the sites (saskatoon admin tend to be more "strict" with following the book on us requesting days off, leaves of absence, etc., regina tends to get much less teaching during clerkship years because it's not the academic center of the province, etc.). Positives would be: great teaching, tons of hands on experience (even more if you wanna do your clerkship at the Prince Albert site although they tend to get much less didactic teaching there), not a ton of residents/fellows so you get to do more procedures but still enough to help you out and supervise, brand new state of the art anatomy lab that just opened a couple years ago, nice new renovated classrooms and a really nice new health science library for studying (although you share with a lot of students from other colleges), really nice SIM labs they let us use pretty frequently (at least 2-3 times per year and in pre-clerkship like... 5-6 times in 3rd year), brand new clinical teaching resource center in the health science building that has simulated clinic rooms for standardized patient clinical skills learning in pre-clerkship. So basically, the facilities are nice, and I think the teaching quality and volume is quite good. Overall, I would be surprised if the U of M program isn't fairly equivalent. Mostly just depends on where you'd rather live. But the cities are pretty similar aside from size. Good luck deciding if it comes to that!
  18. 1 point
    NLengr

    Attrition rates for each medical school?

    I used to buy lottery tickets when residency got really tough. It was a marker of how stressed I was.
  19. 1 point
    I buy every draw, it's the only thing that gives me hope I can buy it if I skip meals, meals don't give me hope at least not when I'm trying to choke them down in 30 seconds while getting paged btw today is the draw, everyone go buy
  20. 1 point
    Dentistry101

    Help! Dal vs UofT

    Ya that's not a controlled objective experiment, he knows 3 different people that go to the schools, but I've been to all 3 schools and tbh dal is the best so he should definitely let go of his uoft spot cuz mans r hungry
  21. 1 point
    Jax

    2018 UdM MD LISTE D'ATTENTE

    JE VIENS DE RECEVOIR UNE RÉPONSE!!! DE UDEM GOOD LUCK A TOUT LE MONDE NEVER GIVE UP
  22. 1 point
    Time Stamp: 9:02am, Tuesday, June 5th (3rd round of invites) 3rd time applying, 2nd interview Accepted IMP (Off wait-list, 2nd choice) AGPA: ~85% (B.Sc.) MCAT: 508 (126 Cars) The first time I wrote it I got 505, went back for a re-write after last years rejection. Wasn't a huge improvement, but I know everything helps. ECs: Lots of sports related things, such as coaching football and basketball at my high school, playing basketball at a youth custody center, on a committee for a charity that supports kids playing sports, play in semi-competitive leagues, intramurals. All long term commitments (several years or longer). Did some of the traditional stuff such volunteering at hospitals and health related organizations, some tutoring. Also added some smaller things, like volunteering at an animal shelter, playing music, travel experience. Finally, I added some life experience that I thought would give them an idea of who I am (split family, 4 younger siblings, etc.). No research or publications. Geography: IP Interview: Average last year. Second time doing the interview was a huge benefit. First time I was super nervous and definitely rambled on some of the stations. This time I felt fantastic coming out of this interview and I'm almost certain it helped my overcome my low MCAT and average grades. From last year (rejected post -interview) NAQ: 30.56 AQ: 22.87 TFR: 53.43 I've been lurking on this forum for 2 years now, reading posts of success stories of people who had similar applications to mine. It helped keep me hopeful, and for that I am thankful. So I wanted to post my story to give those people like me out there some hope as well. My advice would be (and this was also given to me by my step-dad who graduated from UBC med many many years ago), if it's really something you want to do, it is only matter of WHEN not IF. I didn't do a lot of volunteering when I was doing my undergrad and had to catch up after I graduated. I picked stuff that I enjoyed doing (such as sports, coaching) which made it a lot easier to commit to for a long period of time. Of course, everyone needs to throw in some strategic volunteering, but I really think most of it should be stuff that is representative of who you are. Everyone's application is different, so focus on your strengths. For me it was my ECs and my interview, of that I am certain. And don't be afraid to add things to your ECs that you may think are not important! They want to get to know who you are, and how you spend your time. For the interview I tried to show an ability to see multiple sides of the issue, look at the big picture, and take an integrative approach to a solution. The prompts will never have a simple answer, that's the way they are designed. Talk through it, show empathy and compassion to all sides of the issue, be confident and willing to correct yourself. or to stop and think for a few seconds to collect your thoughts. Most of all, try to have fun with it and be genuine. Anyway, if this post gives even one person some hope then I will consider it an success. I'm so happy right now, it's an incredible feeling to see that e-mail after so much rejection and heartbreak. Just keep working at it!
  23. 1 point
    Can confirm. Finished med school, still not salty or cynical. That was a lot of fun.
  24. 1 point
    So happy and relieved to finally been able to post this.. AcceptedAGPA: 83.2%ECs: worked many odd jobs, had diverse volunteer experiences, included my involvement in sports and musicGeography: IPYear: Graduated in 2014 This is my FIFTH application (yes 5TH application) and 4th interview. In the past, my NAQ scores have been around 32+, the biggest challenge I had was the MMI, which after the 3rd interview, I realized what I had to change and luckily it worked (one of the interviewers even commented that me, "that was a really impressive response." My first three interviews have been between "Below Average" and "Average." This forum has been a blessing to me and I'm happy to help others in any way possible. Feel free to message me.
  25. 0 points
    Eudaimonia

    CMA backpacks

    Has my memory lost it or are the 2015/2016 colors switched? Also seems we have a subdued palette this year, to the disappointment of those who wanted bright colors!
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