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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/06/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    You are going into the wrong career my friend...
  3. 2 points
    xiphoid

    Interview Invites date?

    I completely agree that unprofessionalism is very important; also agree that the med school seems to use a very broad definition of the word professionalism. Things like if we RSVP for an event but then do not go to the event without giving at least 24 hours notice, is written up as unprofessional conduct on our part. I think my annoyance is simply with the fact that it seems to be used against us by the med school to get us to do exactly what they want us to do and make their lives easier. At the end of the day, we're all adults, life happens, sometimes things just don't go according to plan and that shouldn't come as a point against us for professionalism.
  4. 2 points
    Can’t say I disagree, but I guess it’s all “character” building. The reality is that we will be joining a profession where decisions, timelines, outcomes etc are often somewhat out of our control, so we might as well develop the skills to handle it. I have been waiting close to 15 years to put in my application (mature applicant here); I try to enjoy every moment (good, bad and indifferent), otherwise life will pass you by. It’s easier said than done however, and next week can’t come soon enough for me either!
  5. 1 point
    Probably just inviting everybody without any meaningful screening.
  6. 1 point
    PhD2MD

    Struggling in Med School ...

    99% of people who match to internal were not co-chairs. Preceptors are often hard to get a hold of. There is nothing in your story that is worrisome. Also, uderstand that imposter syndrome is quite real. Even with my PhD, productive clinical research, and recent awards in my field, I feel inadequate and unprepared. It's a feeling that is hard to shake, no matter what.
  7. 1 point
    rmorelan

    Struggling in Med School ...

    Internal medicine is the second largest field in all of medicine - that means the vast majority of your class going into that field will not have any special co-chairing experience related to it. If your school is average sized dozens of people will be going into internal medicine - only 2 will be a co-chair etc. Plus I will say from the other side having such ECs doesn't really matter that much in the application process if at all. It also has one of the highest match rates, i.e. it is one of the easier things to get into for sure. Now getting a particular subspecialty in internal is another matter mind you - their real challenging part comes later. I could go through each of those and point out how little that matters to get into internal medicine (preclerkship shadowing is nice for you to know what you are doing but not super exciting for actually getting into internal medicine as an example) but I think that might be targeting the wrong part of this. You are making things in a sense more competitive by thinking the bar is set where you need to do all the things you are proposing to get into internal medicine. Over time you will get a few preceptors that know you and support you - you don't need to shadow a ton of people. It can be a slowish process but that is fine. Preclerkship is to make sure you know the basic medicine so that you don't sound like an idiot in clerkship where things really count and matter more. I know it can be a bit scary starting off - particular as unlike premed times there are no real goal posts like GPA or the MCAT to guide you. I too was the first person in my family to go to university - it wasn't a barrier really
  8. 1 point
    Neurophiliac

    UBC Verifiers Second Round Contact

    I think the Nov 15 was only for @Yeeewww because I believe they give one week for verifiers to respond once they receive the email. And since they send out emails at different times for different applicants, there is no fixed deadline for all applicants. So for @Lothrandir it could have been the stage where his verifier didn’t respond and so adcom opted for the phone option. If @Lothrandir’s employer didn’t pick up the phone at least a couple of times, adcom would have sent the no-verifier-response email. I think that’s what happened.
  9. 1 point
    frenchpress

    Interview Invites date?

    It often seems this way to me as well. The expectations are applied inconsistently and often inappropriately, which makes it feel all the more disingenuous. For example, the last time I tried to notify them in advance that I was going to be absent for a day for an important personal reason, someone in the chain was unsatisfied with the two paragraphs I wrote about how I would make up the time. I was tossed into a long back and forth requiring me to repeatedly detail the tiny minutia of why I would be absent and exactly who I would contact and exactly how I would make up every hour of missed time. Even though I had already given them 95% of that info in my initial request, because I missed one thing they were treating me like I was trying to put one past them. Every email included the threat that if I didn’t give them exactly what they wanted my absence wouldn’t be approved and I would risk professional misconduct if I didn’t come to class. All that, for trying to trying to act professionally and let people know ahead of time I wouldn’t be there. And as I have discovered from talking to other students, if you just skip class and submit an unexplained absence claiming you were sick, no one seems to care. So doing the right thing professionally amounts basically to a punishment, and you may be better off to lie. Not a great example to set.
  10. 1 point
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS

    Interview Invites date?

    Yep. My experience was that our signed family practice forms were due at 6pm on a Friday. I was late and submitted it at 7pm, but the level of pettiness and passive aggressiveness in the email I received was ridiculous considering the fact that there was no way on earth anyone on staff was checking forms after 6pm on on Friday. It was my first ever 'infraction' and they literally threatened to not allow me to advance in the program. Even things like reviewing lecturers are considered a professional responsibility. I definitely agree that it seems like professionalism is just how the university gets us to do whatever they want/need us to, given that they have relatively little power in a pass/fail system.
  11. 1 point
    Hirschsprung

    Campus Mauricie

    Salut! Oui les cours sont en visioconférence! Par contre, seulement les cours magistraux, ce qui équivaut environ à 3-4 cours par bloc ou un peu plus pour les cours de clinique. Les travaux sont généralement en APP (apprentissage par problème) en sous-groupe d'environ 8 étudiants. Par contre, il y a beaucoup d'avantage du côté de l'exposition clinique! Je t'invite à m'écrire en message privé pour qu'on en discute! Bonne chance!
  12. 1 point
    IMislove

    Interview Invites date?

    I want to like this a thousand times.
  13. 1 point
    I did my undergrad at a small university in Northern Ontario, and couldn’t have asked for a better experience! My classes were small, everyone was friendly, and there were a lot of opportunities to get involved in different research projects. Many of my classmates in medical school went to larger universities, and talk about how people in their programs were very competitive. I didn’t experience any of that in undergrad, fortunately. I agree with the posters above that if you go to school in a city that you want to be in, it’ll be a more enjoyable experience, and will be easier to do well in your program. There are some programs that do make it difficult to take the pre-reqs that some schools need/are covered on the MCAT (like nursing and engineering), but I would choose a program that interests you. Best of luck! feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
  14. 1 point
    I would stay away from the Prep courses. They are very expensive and usually yield poor results. Some have decent resources but the actual lectures are pretty useless. Just study on your own and you will do much better and will be able to focus on your weaknesses. I don’t know anyone who has taken a prep course and done great on the MCAT. Don’t be intimidate by the material, most of it is very basic and not difficult to grasp. It is more about training your mind to think in a specific way. I would argue that neither prep courses or university courses will prepare you adequately to excel at the MCAT.
  15. 1 point
    I'm getting so nervous - especially for Monday. Really hoping I don't open my inbox to regrets..
  16. 1 point
    bluepen

    cGPA vs wGPA

    "At Queen’s we review the cumulative GPA and 2 year most recent GPA. Whichever of the two is highest is the one associated with the applicant’s application." This is taken directly from their website.
  17. 1 point
    rmorelan

    cGPA vs wGPA

    you know because they tell you that is what they do They have little reason to otherwise really, and we also know that people who only have the GPA to hit their targets using one or the other formula but not both has in fact gotten interviews. Schools when they do tell you want their policies are will be following those policies - it is more than tough enough with what the already have. That also means that if they have a policy (like a last two years one) then you will not be disadvantaged if following that policy is how you hit the GPA total. Rules are rules.
  18. 1 point
    helicase

    cGPA vs wGPA

    Nobody knows for sure. I think they're assumed to be the same. They will take whatever is higher, and a cGPA of 3.75 probably makes the cutoff. With a Masters degree they are more lenient on your GPA (how much/exactly how that plays out is unknown). As far as your GPA goes, I'd say it's worth it to apply!
  19. 0 points
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