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  1. 14 points
    warthog

    May 14 Countdown

    It kind of feels weird knowing that in less than 24 hours, the trajectory of my life could be drastically different. On the other hand, I sincerely wish you all the best of luck!!! Regardless of the result, you took on this process. You committed to every step, and you made it this far — there are many that didn’t!
  2. 14 points
    anonymouspls

    May 14 Countdown

    Kawhi Leonard is my daddy
  3. 9 points
    PotatoPotato

    May 14 Countdown

    Best of luck tomorrow everybody and thank you for the company you definitely helped me stay a little more sane and a lot less alone. I hope you all hear some good news tomorrow and whatever happens, you've all done an amazing job working hard over the years, putting your best application forward and waiting through this crazy process.
  4. 5 points
    Bonjour, J'ai reçu un refus de l'Université de Montréal jeudi pour des MEM insatisfaisants. Par contre, je trouve ça étrange puisque je m'étais vraiment bien préparée pour les entrevues, j'avais de bons exemples à donner, je m'étais pratiquée, etc. En sortant des MEM j'avais un bon feeling et je m'attendais à une note au-dessus de la moyenne. Même en repensant à mon entrevue après avoir reçu le refus, je ne comprend vraiment pas ce qui aurait pu causer un score aussi bas. J'ai donc demandé une révision de dossier dont le résultat devrait arriver bientôt. Je pense qu'il pourrait y avoir eu une erreur. J'ai été refusée pour la même raison l'année passée, mais je n'étais aucunement préparée, je savais pas à quoi m'attendre, je n'étais pas très confiante et j'ai été déstabilisée à certaines stations. J'ai donc commencé à me préparer pour cette année peu de temps après mon refus de l'an passé et je suis arrivée vraiment confiante et préparée aux MEM cette année. Je me demande s'il y aurait pu avoir une confusion entre mon dossier de cette année et celui de l'année passée. Est-ce que vous êtes au courant d'erreurs semblables qui ce sont déjà produites ? Je sais que ça parait peu probables mais je connais beaucoup de personnes qui ont été victimes d'erreurs dans le processus d'admission de médecine, par exemple refus avant les entrevues avec des cotes vraiment élevées. Merci beaucoup
  5. 5 points
    Hey, it's not that something went wrong for you to not get the offer right away, but that something went right for you to be waitlisted and not be rejected right away It's all relative, I know many others would be grateful to be in your spot. I was also waitlisted back in 2015 and managed to come off it after lots of prayers! I think the movement on the waitlist is quite good...I would agree and guess that probably half the people on waitlist will get offers but can't say for sure...
  6. 4 points
    Alimali

    Waitlist Support Thread 2019

    stay positive folks, im an OOP student with an offer to UBC. I'm just waiting for OMSAS results to come out. Most likely, I will decline my UBC offer and free up a spot on the waitlist. I know a couple of other OOP friends in the same position, who are just waiting for OMSAS.
  7. 4 points
    Neurophiliac

    Disheartened

    Hi lecter, First and foremost, I sincerely commend you for working so hard all these years and showing dedication and commitment to follow your dream. I can totally understand what you're feeling ... believe me. I know how disappointing it is when you don't receive the news you were hoping for despite all your hard work; I know how demoralizing it feels when bad news comes knocking... I know these because I've had to battle and push through those same feelings myself (many... many times). It took 6 applications before I received an offer this cycle. I explored all the possibilities before I was finally accepted: Going from being rejected before the interview, to rejected after the interview, to rejected after being waitlisted, to being ineligible for 2 whole years... to finally being where I've been dreaming about for God knows how long. What I'm trying to say is that persistence is key. Passion is what derives my persistence. Knowing that I want nothing other than practicing medicine for my future career is what pushed me through those dark times. From what you've shared, it seems like you are a passionate, hardworking, and dedicated individual – qualities that will make you an excellent and successful physician. I know it is much easier said than done, but as @dduk has nicely worded, please try your best to put your focus on yourself. Do things that you love and enjoy, whether that'd be starting a new hobby, travelling, volunteering, and much more. When you do the things you love, you'll never get tired of them. They will primarily help contribute to your experiences and broaden your perspective on life; on the side, they will also help improve your application. Please feel free to PM me – I would love to chat with you in more detail, if there is anything specific you'd like me to help you with . I truly wish you the best, and I hope that you receive fantastic news next cycle so that you can share it with all of us on this forum!
  8. 3 points
    Long, long time lurker... and first time poster! This is my third cycle applying to medical schools across Canada. The first time (2016) I was rejected from 6 schools post-interview, the second time I was waitlisted to U of A but never got off the waitlist. I then took a year off from applying to graduate from my Physiotherapy degree and work for a bit to save up money and gain experience. AND I FINALLY RECEIVED MY FIRST ACCEPTANCE TODAY. I am still in shock, this process has filled me with more self-doubt than anything else in my life, and there were so many times where I questioned if I was good enough and debated giving up. To all those that didn't receive good news today, please don't give up on your dreams! Trust me, it will be worth it. Result: Accepted! Geography: IP GPA: 3.99 for U of A MCAT: 514 (127/130/128/129) Degree: Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics (2016), Masters of Science in Physical Therapy (Dec 2018) E.C: Variety, I have worked as a Physical Therapist in a hospital in Calgary for the past 5 months, I compete in Powerlifting (have competed at the national and world level for Team Canada), was on the University rowing and swimming team, President of 2 clubs in university, Medical Volunteer trip to Nepal, Habitat for Humanity, Feed the Hungry, etc. Random summer jobs (Starbucks, Earl's, Ringette Referee, Stampede, etc.) Haven't done any research (which is something my application has always been missing). Interview: Very hard to tell, I have had so many interviews and have been unsuccessful at all of them so I never get my hopes up anymore. I just tried to be myself. Interviews have always been the weakest part of my application. I am very social and able to make friends and connections with my patients, but something about bragging about myself has always been uncomfortable for me. My first round of applying, I didn't practice at all and was always concerned about feeling too conceited. I have learnt the hard way that you can't be successful in Med school interviews trying to be modest. The past few years I have practiced talking about my accomplishments with confidence and not trying to down play them, which has finally paid off! I also was able to draw examples from patient encounters with most questions which I think really benefitted me. I have been waitlisted to Calgary, and am waiting to hear from a few Ontario schools tomorrow, so haven't quite made a decision yet, but SO SO excited to finally be able to say I did it after all this time. Congratulations to everyone else that has gotten accepted, especially those that have taken multiple years like myself. And once again, to those that haven't gotten accepted, I know the feeling, but please don't let it define you. I believe in you!!!!! Edit: Ended up getting accepted to 4 schools and 1 waitlist, but have made the decision to accept U of A! So excited to meet you all in August!!!
  9. 3 points
    keener12345

    May 14 Countdown

    I feel like throwing up... lol this is gonna be a sleepless night!
  10. 3 points
    Result: Accepted! Geography: IP GPA: 3.89 MCAT: 505 (126 CARS) - Yes, it's very possible to get in with a low MCAT!! Degree: Bachelor of Science in Biology, minor in Chemistry (2013); MSc in Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (2017) E.C: Long-term, but not overly diverse IMO. Competitive soccer player; varsity at an NCAA Div 1 school in the US for 4 years, team captain for final 2 years; Mission Trip with my soccer team, plus other volunteer work in our local community. LOTS of research; completed a thesis-based MSc and currently work as a clinical research assistant; quite a few research presentations (oral and poster, national and international conferences) and awards (including NSERC-CGS). I'm also fortunate to have 4 publications. Interview: First interview at UofA. Really enjoyed the panel portion. I found the MMI questions much more easy to relate to than UBC's. Came out of it feeling pretty good... a few stations definitely felt better than others, but overall it was a positive experience! Congratulations to everyone who got accepted today! I will likely be turning down this offer to attend Calgary (wanting to stay closer to home), so hopefully this helps someone on the waitlist!!
  11. 3 points
    J'espère que le processus de révision te sera favorable. Quand tu dis que tu savais ce que les interviewers voulaient voir ou pas, je crois que c'est là que tu peux te tromper. Peut-être que tu pensais que telle ou telle qualité était évaluée à une station, alors que c'était autre chose complètement. Un de mes proches a été refusé 2 fois en médecine à cause de mauvaises entrevues, alors qu'il s'était beaucoup préparé et qu'il pensait avoir délivré une bonne performance. Il a été accepté l'année où il a décidé d'être lui-même et n'a pas essayé d'agir en fonction de ce qu'il pensait qui était évalué. Je pense que le processus est vraiment fait d'une telle façon qu'on ne peut pas évaluer de façon objective notre propre performance. Aussi, il ne s'agit pas de se vendre, mais bien de montrer qui nous sommes, et notre parcours de vie nous soutient dans notre façon de s'exprimer, de démontrer de l'empathie, de résoudre des problèmes, de communiquer, etc! D'une façon ou d'une autre, je te souhaite le meilleur. Si c'est pas pour cette année, ça sera pour l'an prochain, sans aucun doute!!!
  12. 3 points
    Raton

    Application Médecine Vétérinaire 2018

    Voilà, je ne connais pas nutrition mais c'est les vétérinaires de la clinique dans laquelle j'ai fait beaucoup d'observation qui m'ont conseillé physio pour l’apprentissage anatomie et physiologie, l'examen physique complet (une m'a même dit tu sais entre un genou d'un cheval et celui d'humain il y a beaucoup de ressemblance anatomique et dans l'observation du mouvement etc...)Par contre il faut aussi que tu regardes si med vet ne fonctionne jamais (C'est plate et j'en fait des cauchemars) mais il faut y penser...quel métier te vois-tu exercer? Qu'aimes-tu le plus étudier car je crois que c'est deux bons programmes et oui il y a une bonification mais comme les deux programmes sont bien cotés et le bonus a moins d'impact que pour quelqu'un qui est en bio par exemple. Mais physio et nutri sont plein de gens qui veulent changer de programme, c'est donc très compétitif.
  13. 3 points
    C'est possible ! Tu perds rien a essayer :-) Pour ma part, après les entrevues à McGill j'avais un mauvais feeling pcq je n'ai pas réussit à compléter les « tâches » dans la majorité des stations. Malgré tout, j'ai été accepté, donc j'en retire que si ton « bon feeling » vient du fait que tu as accompli(e) les différentes tâches des stations, ça veut pas dire grand chose. Selon ce que j'ai compris des entrevues, les différentes tâches associées aux scénarios sont seulement des prétextes pour voir comment tu réagis/interagis face à différentes situations. Le fait d'accomplir la tâche en particulier a surement un poids très faible comparativement à la multitude d'autres critères qu'ils évaluent ! Mais bon, au final, j'ai fait les entrevues à McGill et non pour l'UdeM, donc il y a fort probablement des divergences au niveau des entrevues en tant que tel, mais aussi au niveau de l'évaluation des candidats ! Mais si ton feeling était bon non seulement du fait que tu avais accompli(e) les tâches, mais qu'aussi tu étais satisfait(e) de ta performance en terme de montrer tes vraies couleurs et « vendre ta personne », ça me sonne effectivement étrange. Somme toute, bonne chance et lâche pas la patate
  14. 3 points
    I've had the same experience before years back and know how unsettling it can feel to see interviewers actually ranked you vs your practice. Depending on the audience, it's important to take the advice of those you are practicing with discretion. When practicing with current/re-applicants, it's possible that you have the situation of the blind leading the blind. If practicing with a med student, you have the possibility that these individuals actually aren't outstanding interviewees, but their pre-interview stats carried them through (school dependent of course). In my experience, I've given answers that (even in my mind) had been hot garbage but still received highly positive feedback from both parties alike. However, this is not to say that I find all individuals at these groups unreliable. In some, I've found very mature, highly insightful individuals whom I later kept in contact with for practice in private. Meanwhile, I did group practice sessions to develop comfort in sharing my ideas with new faces. After 3 years of doing interview prep and watching many very qualified friends get in before myself, here are some of my opinions regarding the qualities of great interviewees. Note that I'll only be mentioning things I find outstanding since all the general advice provided in other threads is already excellent and these are things that I think can give you a leg up/ a big window of improvement. I'll divide my comments into 3 groups based on question type; ethical/scenario, policy, personal/abstract. Ethical/scenario: Does the applicant consider that there are points of ambiguity within the question and address the major salient stems/branches that can result? Sometimes questions will be very broad and its important to acknowledge/state your assumptions, or work with the major realms of possibilities within each. Also mention the points that you will need to clarify (and how- is it private info?). Does the applicant understand their role, its scope and limitations? You won't be able to be a superhero in every scenario. It's important to acknowledge that you understand who you are in the chain of command, and let that dictate your steps moving forward and how to best address issues in a realistic way that respects authority and public interest. Red flag territory: Are there unfair assumptions/biases being made while answering the question? Similarly, some questions might elicit applicant assumptions (ie a wife is cheating on their husband if a recent newborn child's DNA is different from his) but it is important to avoid these pitfalls. There are so many alternative explanations for why this could be the case. Policy: Can the applicant identify the populations that are severely impacted by laws? Few blanket laws (laws made without exceptions) are ever perfect. There will always be negative impacts on certain populations even in the most seemingly positive policies. A new nation is developing a law that imprisons murderers? Great- but what is the definition of murder here? Does it include assisted suicide (ie will medical professionals be arrested)? How about in self defence or necessity? Discuss these points- if possible- within cons. (After discussing pros/cons) Can the applicant balance the interests of interests of these impacted populations with those of public interest and reach a conclusion? What alternative/accommodation can they provide a suffering party to minimize harm? Personal/abstract: Does the applicant define/describe the abstract item and/or background of their experience well and how it is relevant to the question asked? Undoubtedly, its almost impossible to have an experience that corresponds with the numerous permutations of experiential question types that can be asked. Preparation is key here and try to avoid putting scenarios that might have too large of a disconnect from the experience/question sought. Is the experience unique and/or does what the applicant convey that they did within the experience seem like a difficult feat? Doesnt necessarily have to, but its something that I always remember the people who I practiced with by likely due to feeling impressed by their accomplishments. Is the experience effectively/succinctly/eloquently described? Avoid rambling with unnecessary details but at the same time, don't seem too robotic with the answer. A good mix of thinking on the spot to adjust what details of the experience should be shared and appearing to be talking on the spot rather than using a memorized script is good here Hope this is of help.
  15. 3 points
    UBC Enthusiast

    Waitlist Support Thread 2019

    To roughly figure out the waitlist numbers, may be people can react to this post if they have been waitlisted ?
  16. 2 points
    Longnose

    MED 2019

    Bonjour! suivons tous ensemble l’évolution de la saison 2019 des admissions en médecine concernant notre pays adoré, le Québec. Faites nous savoir vos infos brûûlanteeees
  17. 2 points
    Curiousaboutapps1

    May 14 Countdown

    GOOD LUCK TOMMOROW!! I wish you all the best
  18. 2 points
    clever_smart_boy_like_me

    May 14 Countdown

    ^ your screen name has been my mantra for the last month and a half
  19. 2 points
    DTK87

    Waitlist Support Thread 2019

    Check this out from 2012 https://mdprogram.med.ubc.ca/2012/04/25/offers-process-overview/ I don't think it does... not sure though
  20. 2 points
    Je suis en nutrition et je peux vous dire que les cours de nutrition, biochimie, anatomie et physiologie, etc que nous suivons vont aussi servir en médecine vétérinaire. On apprend amplement sur le corps humain et ces connaissances peuvent être ainsi reliés aux animaux aussi. Par contre, en nutri, il faut vraiment aimer la bouffe et la cuisine, sinon tu risques d'être découragée. Bref, peu importe si tu choisis nutrition ou physio, tu apprendras des choses enrichissantes!
  21. 2 points
    Oui, les stations sont identiques aux 3 unis lors de la même journée. La seule chose qui change c’est samedi vs dimanche!
  22. 2 points
    Est-ce que tu as été officiellement refusé en vet? Si oui, soit tu prend un programme qui t'intéresse vraiment ou encore, si c vrm vet que tu veux faire et que rien d'autre t'intéresse, tu vas à l'udem et tu te force un max pour monter tes notes pour finir par rentrer, moi j'ai pas encore eu de réponse, mais advenant le cas où je ne suis pas pris, je vais aller monter mes notes à l'udem.
  23. 2 points
    hiyayosup

    May 14 Countdown

    Heart pounding, can't breathe. In 24ish hours, we will know our fate...
  24. 2 points
    Thanks everyone for making me feel like I wasn't just an anomaly and for all the tips that you guys provided me to help me get better. To improve oneself is admirable but to improve others is noble; a quality all of you have! Will definitely be using this information to come back next year better and stronger!
  25. 2 points
    haenurplaza

    Physio UdeM

    Non, seulement ceux qui sont moins contingentés malheureusement mais je pense que t'as quand même de très bonnes chances, étant donné qu'il y aura beaucoup de désistements après que le gros lot de réponses de médecine est sorti. J'espère que tu seras accepté(e) en med though, you deserve it
  26. 2 points
    ThomYorke

    Physio UdeM

    Il me semble que si tu n'es pas prise dans aucun de tes choix, l'admission t'offre la possibilité de faire une demande dans un 4e programme.
  27. 2 points
    If you are asking questions related to workload during residency and work life balance, neither are right for you
  28. 2 points
    erythrocyte

    May 14 Countdown

    Fair, I prefer having a set day lol. When interviews were being sent out there were expert level theories on the release dates with some going as far back as 2009 to make estimates
  29. 2 points
    warthog

    May 14 Countdown

    The Cycle of Waiting 1. Hoping: “I have good stats, I think! I did okay in the interview...let me check the Accepted/Rejected/Waitlist thread again...” 2. Imagining: “If I get in, what will I do? Who do I tell first? What do I put on my Facebook? Omg I’d have to quit my job. Would I cry?.” 3. Someone asks you “What’s up?” or “How are you doing?” Or EVEN WORSE: “Any word yet?” This derails your confidence immediately. 4. Racing Heart: “crap crap crap what if I don’t get in? I’d have to tell everyone right? I’d have to start over...I’d have to retake the MCAT.” *lurks on PM101, r/MCAT and r/premed to torture self* 5. Wallowing: “I am not a competitive applicant. I shouldn’t have applied. I wonder what the career prospects are like for goat herding?” *aggressive googling* *cycles through memory of the interview for the trillionth time* *spends weirdly long time reading the medical school website when you’ve memorized it already* *a lot of sighing* 6. Try to Distract Yourself: Start reading books you’ve read already, start going on weird subreddit and YouTube spirals, start researching alpaca farming. “I wonder what Snooki is up to these days?” Wallow/Hoping cycle begins again. You wonder if you should’ve just gone into banking or teaching or public service like everyone else. More sighing. You go on YouTube again. 6. The cycle restarts.
  30. 2 points
    After 6 years of applying to UBC Medicine... going through all the possibilities (regrets before interview, to regrets after interview, to regrets after waitlist, to being ineligible for 2 whole years), I seriously cannot believe I'm writing this... It had always seemed like it's something too good to be true, yet here I am. There are many people I would like to thank (and letting them know will take a solid week) from the bottom of my heart for the support, encouragement, and love they have provided me within this long and incredible journey I have been through. I write this with shock, excitement, and full of heart. TIME STAMP: 11:56 AM PST (May 10, 2019) Result: ACCEPTED VFMP (1st choice) !! Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Deadline GPA or AGPA (if applicable): ~84% MCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 514 – (130 / 125 / 130 / 129) Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): BSc in 2014 Geography (IP/OOP): IP Extracurricular Activities (awards, achievements, volunteering, employment, research, etc.): I had written this description already in a separate post I made, but will be copying it here as well: Founded and lead a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for variety of causes via annual musical concerts, with the last 2 events focused on contributing to schizophrenia (5 years and counting); founded and led another charity aiding developing nations via Save the Children fund (6 years); extensive leadership and volunteering with UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy (8.5 years and counting); long-term ER volunteer and volunteer trainer and program coordinator (8.5 years and counting); long-term St. John Ambulance volunteer and Divisional Administration Officer (2000+ hours over 5 years, and counting); independently provide guidance and support to immigrants and families as they adjust to life in Vancouver/Canada (9+ years and counting); lots and lots of capacity to work with others including skin cancer research/holding workshops for high school students across Metro Vancouver, volunteering with med students and residents via UBC Department of Emergency Medicine, working closely with refugees and youth with physical and/or intellectual disabilities, and more (combined 3300+ hours); and lots and lots of diversity including clinical research as a volunteer, shadowing pediatric surgeons, toxicology research as a volunteer, epigenomics research at Michael Smith Labs, loads of piano and competitions, oil painting, and more. I also work 3 jobs right now, 1 full-time and 2 part-time jobs; full-time is being a research assistant at UBCH working on a project focused on treatment-refractory schizophrenia (over 2 years); part-time jobs include tutoring students in grade 4-12 in math and academic reading with a company, and also tutoring for the MCAT with a company. 1 Publication (1st author) on the application (had a poster publication/presentation on June 7th which couldn't be included unfortunately, and a few are expected to come soon). Lots of awards (mainly from high school) and one high performance activity for winning multiple awards with St. John Ambulance. The intention of this post is to try and help people down the line, so that's why I'm including lots of details. Interview: I finished my interview initially feeling good about my answers. I had a terrific interview experience! I felt each interviewer was well engaged in my responses and discussions; they all smiled and nodded as I was answering questions and follow-ups. But then the 3-month period started and man oh man oh man was I second-guessing myself... I kept doubting my answers and my confidence started to drop a little bit each week that had passed. I knew at minimum I did 5/10 stations that I would categorize as "good" and at absolute most 8/10 stations. But overall, especially leading to D-Day, I was completely unsure how I did, but I don't know if I was being too self-critical or not. At the end of the day, I still overthought everything haha. Turned out to be okay I guess! I would like to sincerely congratulate everyone who received an offer this year and sincerely congratulate in advance those who will be receiving offers from the waitlist! It's an overwhelmingly amazing feeling that I get a chance to be in class with you folks – I cannot wait to meet each and every one of you as we finally set to make our dreams become a reality . For those who didn't receive the news they were hoping for, I can definitely understand how you feel, believe me... Disappointing news can be demoralizing, but let me tell you that you were selected to interview for a reason; you all have incredible potential so please keep your chin held up high and do not allow, even for a single moment, a decision to define who you are. As my case can further add to the supporting evidence, persistence is absolutely key.
  31. 1 point
    disclaimer: speculation incoming, do not take this as the truth. Je crois que les écoles peuvent aussi faire des calculs avec nos cotes R et assigner un score qui ressemble à ceux des entrevues à chacune des cotes. Donc, ils prennent pas nécessairement 35 ou 40 directement, mais ils font plutôt comparer ta cote avec la moyenne des cotes R des gens qui ont passé les MEMs. Comment les scores MEMs fonctionnent c'est que la moyenne de tout le monde est fixée à 500, et pour chaque écart-type, t'ajoutes ou enlèves 50 à ton score (donc 400 = 2 écarts-type en bas de la moyenne et 600 = 2 écarts-type en haut de la moyenne). J'imagine c'est la même chose avec les cotes R. Mettons la moyenne de toutes les CRC est à 37, c'est là ton 500. Si l'écart-type est de 1, t'obtiendrais 550 si t'as une cote R de 38, ou bien 450 si t'as une cote R de 36. Avec cette logique, tu peux t'attendre à un score de 600 avec un 39 ahahahah. C'est ca ce que je pense qu'ils font, mais je sais vraiment pas.
  32. 1 point
    Merci pour vos conseils !! Non, je ne suis pas officiellement refusée en medvet et oui c'est sur que je vais appliquer en medvet l'année prochaine si je ne suis pas prise cette année! Vous avez tous des très bons points!! J'aurais peut-être dû aller en ergo à laval finalement, mais je l'ai déjà refusé... Trop une grosse décision pour moi hahah
  33. 1 point
    Jo0709

    PharmD 2019

    C’est juste pour Ulaval, à UdeM la LA n’est pas encore sortie
  34. 1 point
    Check this out, super helpful for any prospective students! I am graduating from the Mac PT program this year and wish I had a resource like this going into it.
  35. 1 point
    Hey! I have a special case but it might be useful to hear about. I did 8 part-time years for my undergrad, without a single full-time semester. It made me ineligible to apply for almost all med schools across Canada (only found that out once I started applying last summer. Quite the disappointment.) UBC seems unique in that they don’t care about full-time as much as other institutions. I was just accepted to UBC. I had to write an extensive academic explanation essay to explain my strange transcript. I had another career as an athlete during my undergrad so my schedule legitimately prevented me from going to school. I guess UBC agreed. So, UBC might value full-time less than other places across Canada, but, I would really recommend checking the requirements for other places so that you are able to apply broadly
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    casajayo

    MS1 happy to answer questions

    I would agree that at the beginning of the year especially people go a bit overboard with partying, but it tapers down quite a bit after the first month (or maybe I just stopped going out, who knows). At the same time, there are lots of people who don't drink in our class and still attend events and have fun, and I haven't seen any judgement from others around drinking or not (both ways). I think it can be difficult to come up with group activities once the weather turns, so it's easy to fall back on eating out, but yes that can get pricey after a while. Many groups who weren't outdoors-oriented did seasonal activities (UBC Farm apple festival, Halloween train in Stanley Park, Holiday festivals around christmas), or organized potlucks, games nights, sports watching events, etc. If you hear of anything going on, just ask to join! I would also heavily encourage people to get involved with activity-related clubs - this year we started a culinary club to cook food, the Bhangra club is always amazing, and there's also games clubs, sports teams, choir, band, art, and other things so you should hopefully be able to find a group that you can meet some like-minded people in to do things that aren't related to med at all.
  38. 1 point
    lunart

    Physio UdeM

    Les choix sont dispo dans ce lien https://admission.umontreal.ca/choix/subu-po/
  39. 1 point
    Je pense que tout est possible, alors tu ne perds rien à essayer de faire une révision
  40. 1 point
    haenurplaza

    Opto 2019

    Je viens de recevoir une offre par courriel! Whew, cette semaine a été dure avec mon refus en med (je ne pensais pas avoir foiré l'entrevue à ce point là ), mais I guess optometry picked me before med did
  41. 1 point
    4thxsthecharm

    Unexpected Below Average Interview

    Hey @Jambon I'm in the same boat as you my friend. At the very least this year I was hoping to see an 'average' grade for my interview. Especially after a year of preparing and knowing what the interview is like. At least we would see some progress right? I'm not so sure there is much more we can do though. I've worked on my interview skills and have been keeping up on Canadian Healthcare and various contemporary issues so I feel fluent in such topics. Even others that might catch me off guard. What else is there to do? I think the reality is that every individual applying is brilliant to begin with and are putting in the extra work they deem necessary for themselves to give themselves the best chance. Chalking it up to luck and just keeping with it might be the way to go as tough as it is. For me personally, I think being able to project a bit more confidence and learning to talk with a bit more conviction is about all I could do. Two qualities I see in people who I know are better interviewers than myself. Hope this helps!
  42. 1 point
    casajayo

    Unexpected Below Average Interview

    +1 for this answer - remember that while some interviewers are medicine-related (docs, students, etc), many are just people from the community. There's an intrinsic bias that makes people ask "would I want this person as my doctor?" and speaking to a robot with a logical answer will always lose over someone with heart and their best answer. Practice with your family, with people who know nothing about med, with people who know you as a person with a heart and personality. Take a look through some of the acceptance write-ups, particularly from those of us who had lower GPA's, as we really needed to shine in the interview to make up some score. I think a common trend with this group that you'll see is that interviews felt like a conversation, with flow and heart and genuine interest in the topic and the person sat across the table. Saying this, we don't know how you prepared, but hopefully this provides some guidance for next year
  43. 1 point
    Felt I should add my stats in here because I’m super stoked and would want someone like me who was applying to see this... 2013 was my first application to medical schools in Canada, 2019 was my 1st interview at UBC. Accepted, VFMP (1st Choice) TIME STAMP: 11:56am PSTEarly or Regular Deadline: RegularAGPA (if applicable): ~83MCAT: 124 in CARS, 513 overall. Geography: IP Educational background: BSc and MSc , plus some Continuing Ed. ECs: Not an Olympian. Didn’t have any publications from my Master’s degree until after the June deadline, but some poster presentations. My weak GPA didn’t get me on the Dean’s Honours List. BUT I had years and years of service/volunteering/philanthropy and policy work during high school and university years, working in marginalised communities in BC, experiences from my life that let me be in leadership roles outside of school, and having made connections with people that supported me over many, many years and were so thrilled to be verifiers (and making me cry seeing their genuine excitement when I told them I got in). Honestly, it took a village to raise me and they were all included in my application. Interview: I worked a full-time and part-time job while prepping for interviews, but all I can say is that I spent NUMEROUS hours working with friends, colleagues, anyone who I could find that wanted to spend the time to give me honest feedback to prepare. I wanted the input of non-applicants (I wasn’t here for the biased opinions and shadiness, and that’s the T), and I went in feeling great. I read articles for 5 hours a day to understand what was going on. I listened to podcasts while I worked. I watched the evening news before going to bed. Unfortunately, getting to the interview day and walking up to the first station, it was an out of body experience that I didn’t anticipate and my anxiety got the best of me. I know I had brought enough into the conversations, but it wasn’t at my best — however, I was happy to know that it was enough. Having low grades and a threshold CARS score was really pushing me to prove my worth in the interview and I did (and I’m so proud of that). The acceptance email comes and the grades no longer matter, the number of times I tried and wrote the MCAT no longer matter, the years of failed and rejected applications no longer matter. I’m looking forward. Forward to a new chapter and new beginning. Getting into medical school is easy for some with the grades and the privileges, however, without those, it’s full of hurdles. Jumping over enough of them will eventually get you to the finish line. One yes is all you need.
  44. 1 point
    Well I'm just going to go ahead and post this, likely my final post on this site with an account from 2012 lol. Result: Rejected Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Timestamp: I don't want to look at it again LOL AGPA: 85.1% MCAT: 513- 128/126/129/130 NAQ: 34.11 TFR: 56.60 Interview: Below average Year: BSC. 2015 Geography: IP This is my 4th application and 2nd interview. Interview: I thought it went really well. I was confident, calm, and professional. I felt 4 stations went excellent, 4 were good and 2 could have been better (maybe rambled a bit?) but nothing bad. I thought there was potential for a above average score, and I would've been fine with a average score as well, its a step up....but I never thought I'd get below average. Everyone I practiced with, including doctors, residents, other applicants and medical students I practiced with extensively...are shocked. I did roughly 250-300 hours of actual practice with these people and 20-30 hours of research on my own and in groups on topics we thought would come up in the interview, and they did, and i was very well prepared. I've reflected on it and I have no idea how this could've been possible. My only explanation is that I simply do not have the demeanor or personality they are looking for. The fact is that I am not an extroverted super outgoing and talkative person. I cannot smile while I speak and I cannot speak as eloquently as others. I cannot be someone I am not, I am simply me. I cannot pretend to be Mr. mega extrovert who goes skiing every weekend while slurping coffee and his Facebook is filled with rock climbing photos with friends and laughs HAHAHAHA at every god damn thing for no reason with perfect white teeth. This is what they want or at least someone who can pretend to be this person. Although I did laugh with the interviewers and two even complimented me and I really connected with them...I still got a below average interview. There is an inherent bias in this process in being a likable person at first impression and I am probably not that person. At least based on my reflections so far, I cannot fathom another reason why I got below average. If I only knew why, I would do my best to improve but I do not so this is my conclusion based on the little data I am given. I know two other people with similar personalities and demeanor as myself, with 90%+ gpa and 515+ mcats that have been rejected over 4 times post interview...and guess what...they have very similar personalities to mine and their interviewing is actually excellent in organization and content in my opinion and those of others. Oh and despite hundreds of hours of volunteering added since my previous interview 2 years ago, and several new positions and projects i've been working on....my NAQ remains the same. I mean this is getting pretty stupid. So although I will apply again (since there's nothing to really lose at this point), this is over. There's no hope left and I know when to give up. I cannot commit like this again practicing that much. I need to start another career, perhaps I'll do a trade at BCIT. I cannot continue gambling my life away like this every year while everyone else moves on. But realistically I have no idea what I'm going to do. I'm starting to forget why I wanted to become a doctor in the first place. I gambled and lost, and this gamble certainly was not worth it. I'd never advise anyone i their first year to take this path. I could possibly get in if I keep applying for a few years, my stats are not bad and eventually i might get a hang of being a psychopath who can flip their very being 180 degrees but i wonder if its even worth it. I don't blame myself anymore, I don't blame god, I don't blame the interviewers either. I blame the North American Medical school system's broken, outdated and prejudice MMI system. I wonder how many fantastic applicants (which I am not, but my friends who got rejected are) were rejected for potential idiots because they just weren't as sociable.
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Your numbers and assumptions are off. Why can't you commute for M1 and M2? You've also drawn the boundaries of your system in the wrong place -- will a divorce cost you more or less than $70,000?
  48. 1 point
    I wish I legitimately knew how much a grind med school, residency and the profession of medicine in general is. And then I consider how nice it would have been to simply sell coconuts off a beach in Turks and Caicos for a living instead of doing medicine.
  49. 1 point
    Discussion style and language suitable for a medical professional.
  50. 1 point
    Absolutely not. People are bastard coated bastards with bastard filling. If you ever find a happy resident find out who their dealer is.
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