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  1. 6 points
    Jennifer_Dickens

    weird feeling

    I started medical school at 32, years after traveling the world, gaining rich and varied work experience, and becoming fluent in multiple languages. I feel sorry for your friends who got into medical school on the first try at the tender age of 20 or 21. Many of them are likely to graduate and become disheartened as residents because their young, idealistic minds expected much more than managing bed issues at 3:00 AM. They're also more likely to get burned out, get divorced and become severely suicidal; if you've applied four times, that means you've become familiar with the taste of rejection, and you've had to continue working hard despite that bitter experience. In brief, you've developed your resilience. Your colleagues, on the other hand, have not had the same, valuable opportunities to strengthen themselves. And how many of those colleagues who got in on the first try now feel stuck because they've incurred debt, don't know how to get out, and feel miserable pursuing a career that doesn't fulfill them in the least? We need way more medical students who are older and have unconventional backgrounds; medicine - especially in Canada - is quite stagnant and in need of original approaches.
  2. 6 points
    mcgillmdbd

    What is each med school "known for"?

    I am very well aware about the differences between undergrad and med culture at U of T, and you don’t need to explain to me the differences between the two. Since you’re an incoming student yourself, I wouldn’t necessarily 100% trust your perspective on the school either. Of course, the upper med students will not tell you that U of T is competitive, they are happy, and I assure you almost every med student is satisfied with their medical school (not just U of T, but likely every other medical school in Canada). When I said U of T is competitive, I didn’t mean that everyone is a gunner or out to get their classmates. Simply put, U of T highly values research and extracurriculars and thus produces competitive students, and this is facilitated by the structure of the curriculum (which I already mentioned and then you tediously elaborated on; I meant it as a good thing). If you look at Carms data, you’ll see more U of T students listing top competitive specialties as their first choice (along with McGill I believe) and yes I’m factoring in the large class size of U of T. This is what I meant by high(er) chances of encountering gunner students at U of T. What also makes U of T more competitive are the giant renown hospitals it runs, and the sheer amount of students, residents, staff and opportunities that come with those. Also keep in my mind that many students from Ontario Med schools eye Toronto for research, networking and residency, making the overall atmosphere more competitive compared to other medical schools. This is not a bad thing, and it’s not a false stereotype I was enforcing in any way. I’m sure U of T med students are kind, and I have known many of them as well. You’re going to have a great time at U of T, and it will be what you make out of it. Chill.
  3. 5 points
    pixieMD

    weird feeling

    LMAOO Which younger colleague hurt you? There's a way to bring people up (including yourself) without putting others down haha. I don't know who you've been speaking to but most of my colleagues are not "young, idealistic minds". Most med students I've talked to (of ALL ages) love what they are learning. And many graduated to love residency. Yes residency is tiring and can burn people out. But that's not because of their age or "how they never experience rejection" (just because they didn't get rejected to medical school does not mean they never faced rejection else where). We all have different things to juggle in life at different ages and residency is time consuming for everyone. Relationships, finances, kids, houses, debt. All these things play a factor in that. Sorry for the rant, I just don't want new medical students to read this and freak out because it is 100% not true. If you don't believe me, you can ask around and ask the residents themselves and see if they believe their "young age" played a role in them feeling burnt out. As for OP, honestly 25 is not that old. I've had plenty of classmates older than that, or perhaps even older. Once you are in med school, no one really cares about the age or even pays attention to it. Everyone kind of just blends in together in class. This is nothing to be embarrassed about.
  4. 5 points
    Result: Accepted (NMP) off the Wait-list 6/8/2020 (3rd application cycle - last year I was on the waitlist until the first day of classes in August) Geography: IP Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Timestamp: 3-4 PM PST AGPA: 87% MCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 509 (CARS 130)Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): BHK 2017 ECs: Random: university/elite athletics, LGBTQ+ advocacy, adventures... Volunteer: varied opportunities and initiatives, extensive youth coaching, physical rehabilitation clinic abroad... Work: paramedic, rehabilitation worker in mental health, respite care for seniors, first aid in industry, pro ski patrol, private kinesiology, undergrad tutoring and other random work experience... no research Interview: I started to get really nervous on the drive to UBC with my partner... I had awful gas and that made me more nervous... it was so bad we were rolling down the windows in Feb... then I just started laughing thinking of all the captive interviewers, and the poor applicant following me... We laughed and I farted from Burrard to campus, practicing jokes incase I needed to say "at least I've left you something to remember me by" etc... luckily for all I didn't need any of them. The interview felt great (so much better than last year) - I had fun. There was one interviewer, I think a current student, who gave almost nothing back and didn't seem to be listening to me - just repeating a few words from my initial answer out of context with each follow up question... that one felt awful. Misread one question... a few others were great and one was amazing (I could not have answered better if I had the question in advance)! June 8th was the fourth round of offers of my 3rd application cycle. I'd checked the blog until the previous round then spent a couple weeks processing and coming to terms with a different life plan and getting excited about beginning MPH studies... About two days after I made peace with not getting in I opened my email and the first thing I saw was a link to a survey for accepted students. I thought admissions had accidentally sent that to everyone on the waitlist, just rubbing it in... :p If you're a future/repeat applicant reading these blogs looking for a little advice or motivation, as I've done before, you'll see that my grades are average, average MCAT, interesting collection of NAQ but nothing exceptional - mostly just getting paid to do interesting things... honestly there are some UBC applicants who could get into any school, any year... then there are hundreds of qualified applicants but only 288 places... Putting all of our accomplishments, values and foundational experiences into an application is incredibly vulnerable but that doesn't mean admissions knows who we are or are qualified to make a judgement of our worth or value as people. Recognizing that the email in December or May could not influence my worth as well as the layers of chance in the application process was liberating for me and this cycle felt so much different because of that freedom - I'm sharing this because maybe it is something that could take a weight off your shoulders too?
  5. 4 points
    Dr. Shqipe

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Hopefully some more movement for both streams next week!! Even though the wait is tough, have a great weekend everyone
  6. 4 points
    cotecc

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    Pour ajouter que si les cours de DC sont en ligne, les cours magistraux le seront probablement aussi puisque les cours de DC sont des cous en petits groupes...mais encore une fois, ca change à tous les jours selon l'humeur de notre cher ministre
  7. 4 points
    Mtlsquad

    DMD 2020

    Pour ce qui sa interesse, le tableau des liste d'attentes est sortie! on s'est rendu a 8 pour universitaires DMD. Felicitations pour tous ceux au dessous de 8. Lachez pas pour ce qui sont au dessus!!
  8. 4 points
    Bambi

    Etudiant "anglophone" en med

    I went to a French medical school away from home and my French was horrible. For the MEMFI, I answered questions that were not asked got zero on these stations. I was put on the wait list and was accepted many months later. For lectures, either the profs mumbled and I could not understand or thy spoke too fast, and I could not understand. I stopped attending lectures before the first week was over, and became self-taught. Receptors routinely complained about my French. However, I was living and breathing in a French milieu, I embraced it, made friends, graduated and am now bilingual. Other Anglos have had similar experiences. It was very hard, but there is success at the end of the rainbow. Moreover, it was a walk in the park compared to residency!
  9. 4 points
    HOLY THAT IS ME! So excited I'm crying! Thank you for the update
  10. 3 points
    conu905

    2020 - 2021 New guidelines

    I emailed them too, I really hope they allow us the option of including winter 2020 grades.
  11. 3 points
    greysweater

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Good sleuthing! They have until June 30th to send in their transcript and until August 1st to complete the BLS, police check, and immunizations. If they're reviewing transcripts on a rolling basis and very quickly, there could be spots opening up because of that. But I feel like the spots opening because people got accepted and will get their offer revoked because they don't meet the conditions wont be until July/August after the class is full email is sent out. This is because the deadlines haven't been reached and it simply just takes a lot of time to verify things. My guess is that they send class is full after everyone has accepted their spots and it looks reasonable. Therefore I don't think everyone has accepted their spots yet and the movement left is from that- rather than people not meeting their acceptance terms. My conservative guess is maybe 5-10 places left in english. Maybe less in french just because its a smaller class size (3-5)?? Also, based the response you got from Chantal, it seems like I was right in that Diane interpreted the amount of spots left as "some" and Chantal interpreted them as "very little". Every year, there are people that get in after the class is full email is sent (its represented in the forum sometimes and anecdotally, I know people it's happened to). It's really sparse but it happens and that is from the people that either deferred/dropped out/ didn't meet their terms I think.
  12. 3 points
    TrustTheProcess21

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Fingers crossed for some movement today!
  13. 3 points
    I was a late comer to liking EM. Came into med school planning on FM with extra reproductive health. Detoured to OB/Gyn for a while. Did my emerg block and an elective and loved it. Decided on FM since I definitely wanted to continue with reproductive care as well. Currently planning to apply for +1 EM (will be doing part time emerg whether or not I get it) and will do part time emerg and have a primary care reproductive health focused clinic in addition. So even though I flip flopped in med school during my short three years (it’s really 2 until you’re doing carms) I am super happy with where I am.
  14. 3 points
    bruh

    What is each med school "known for"?

    There is no absolutely no evidence of this. The idea that UofT is filled with gunners is fuelled by UofT undergrads and med students from other schools. So, it is based solely on conjecture. The only accurate source of information is medical students at UofT themselves who can speak about the culture and environment of the education. I’m an incoming student so I contacted many many upper year UofT med students to ask about the class culture and the education environment; not one student has told me that UofT is competitive, or is filled with gunners. I have spoken to UofT med students who also completed their undergrad there and they said that the undergrad and med experience are completely different. While undergrad at UofT can be cut-throat and competitive, med students are separated into smaller academies where they have their own fb group, they share notes and material with each other, have tons of parties and social events, and enjoy a close-knit connection with each other. This is especially true for MAM, Fitz, and PB, which account for 2/3 of the UofT students. The only academy at UofT that is not as tight-knit is WB simply because the student count is higher (~90 compared to the other three which consist of ~50 students). Gunners will exist at every school but the majority of the class will consist of kind, friendly classmates. Also, UofT changed their medical curriculum recently which is being received very favourably by the med students. We have Wednesdays off, lectures only on Monday and Friday in preclerkship, and the rest of the week is devoted to small group-based learning led by the students themselves or by a faculty member. It’s really not a good idea to speak about what each school is “known” for unless you have accurate, reliable information. We should be working to dispel stereotypes and myths that are being perpetuated, not reinforce them.
  15. 3 points
    Stereotypes and random facts that i've gathered. UofT - med school - competitive, research heavy, pretentious, diverse patient population, big on competitive specialties, people want to stay local for residency McMaster - med school - 3 years, PBL, no anatomy, research heavy (clin epi), verbal/EQ focused school, hippie, either super young or non-trad Queens - med school - small, tight knit, less research, good matches in CaRMS, QuARMs, big on competitive specialties Western - med school - high MCAT score school, SWOMEN, good matches in CaRMS, big on surgery Ottawa - med school - GPA/EC school, french stream, chill laid back, lots of fam med matches NOSM - med school - rural, northern ontario, small, nice, tight knit, friendly
  16. 3 points
    cotecc

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    pour l'instant les cours de démarche clinique seront en ligne selon la faculté, mais la situation change à chaque jour.
  17. 3 points
    Just got an email "Congratulations on joining the Island Medical Program Class of 2024! You will be registered as a student at the University of Victoria. Prior to registration, UVic must confirm whether you have any previous affiliation with the institution, either as an applicant or a student. This will allow you to obtain a UVic ID card, apply for housing, receive health and dental coverage, access the library, etc. Please complete this survey at your earliest convenience, regardless of whether or not you have any previous affiliation with UVic."
  18. 3 points
    Great point, this system is definitely not fair or equitable. I put the blame less on the medical schools themselves and more on the state of our education system in general. In high school, kids are oddly given an easy time, there is no standardized testing and your grades depend more on your individual teacher's biases than your learning as a student. Then in undergrad, the system is so laissez-faire that the smartest way to get into medical school is not to study what you are good at, but to choose the right program and the right courses to get yourself the highest GPA, interest in learning be damned. Ultimately, this system screws over far too many people and people are left doing degree after degree, masters etc, all to be ultimately underemployed. Our system is failing to distribute talent well. In fact, I would argue for a limit on the number of students that should even be studying the life sciences. Its a joke that we make people spend 4 years chasing a med school dream only then to tell them that in order to get any job remotely related to their field, it'll be at least another 2 years of schooling. My bias is that, the government for years has been chasing the "% of population university educated" stat as a measure of its success and while good intentioned is an incredibly flawed statistic. Just making people do 4 years of university while making the populace generally less bigoted and uninformed, also fails to address the appropriate distribution of human resources. We have way too many life science majors in Canada (The single largest group of undergrads at UofT study either Life sciences or Engineering/physical sciences), especially in Ontario and not enough jobs for them all. We have way too many university grads in general, with way too few good well paying jobs for them all. This ultimately results in the phenomenon of people with 4 yr bachelor degrees going to college for training that is practical. One could easily argue those people would have been better off financially if they had just gone straight into college instead.
  19. 2 points
    Corgi1

    What do graduates match to?

    Ottawa has posted its full match list for the last 3 years, would be an interesting comparison. https://med.uottawa.ca/undergraduate/students/convocation Under "Candidates to the degree"
  20. 2 points
    adm2020

    DMD suivi 2020

    Je ne sais pas si ca intéresse quelqu’un, mais je suis 5e LA collegienne et je vais bientot laisser ma place :)) bonne chance a touss
  21. 2 points
    Incoming med student here, this is some really interesting info. I'm wondering where this data is for Ottawa - specifically the ER residents part. I'm staying open minded for specialities, however, EM currently sounds the most salient (lifestyle, culture, training, patient population, practice etc) for non surgical specialties. I've also heard Ottawa has a phenomenal EM program for PGME. I'd love to get some more information.
  22. 2 points
    You're right in the sense that my initial commet was vague.; I never meant that the competition was among the medical students themselves. Since this was posted in the medical students forums, I didn't worry too much about promoting false stereotypes since I assumed most people here are familiar with U of T's medical school. Your explanation about the curriculum and academies is certainly helpful for who are unfamilair with U of T. I simply didn't appreciate how you called my comment evidenceless and assumed I was feeding into negative/false stereotypes.
  23. 2 points
    Jennifer_Dickens

    PBL - what is it REALLY like?

    This post is coming 13 years after the original, but it's never too late. The biggest problem with McMaster is the discrepancy between what they preach and what they practice. They claim to stand out because they accept more mature and unconventional students with non-science backgrounds. But if you take a look at their admissions trends over the last 5 - 7 years, you'll notice that they've fallen back into the baseline habit of being like every other medical school: Accept science students straight out of undergraduate programs. The advantage of that is having more uniform and monolithic classes with energetic, idealistic and motivated students. The administration also faces less resistance and novel ideas, i.e. the student body is easier to control and manipulate. The disadvantage comes in the fact that medicine remains stagnant and deprived of true innovation. Re: PBL, itself, I noticed two major problems while working my way through McMaster's program: 1.) The school claims to be open to discussion and differing ideas, but in practice it's quite intolerant of original thinking. Tuesday mornings are dedicated to "Professional Competencies", which is essentially comprised of lectures dealing with the soft side of medicine: Ethics, law, spirituality, culture, etc. Over time, I noticed that the lectures and resources that were made available to us were extremely biased, one-sided and poor. We had an ER doc give us a lecture on ethics and tell us that there basically was no definition of ethics; a very ignorant statement that ignores at least 2,000 years of philosophy and political science. Our lectures on abortion stressed its absolute necessity but did not touch upon the possible complications that could come as a result. We had a lecture on Indigenous culture that resulted in a student being publically berated in the auditorium after he asked a question that was in line with our learning objectives; people were deadpan and pale as snow when that was happening. It was terrifying. Our Dean publically apologized to everyone EXCEPT for that student. And because McMaster's become so biased and intolerant of original thinking, that's why they're moving away from more mature and unconventional students; they want younger people who more or less all think the same and will agree unanimously with a one-sided opinion. 2.) One comment in this thread mentioned that the tutors for the medical PBL tutorials are experienced clinicians or PhDs, which leads one to logically assume that groups will always receive the best possible teaching. That's grossly inaccurate. I saw countless instances in which the tutor was a family physician and discouraged learners from getting caught up in the nitty gritty details. Meanwhile, these were students who were future medical geneticists, internists, and pathologists who wanted to better understand the biochemistry behind clinical presentations. This also contributes to the fact that a lot of these tutors aren't properly trained in education and sometimes make poor/lazy teachers. Quite a few students who asked for guidance were invited to "go and read around it", rather than being recommended specific sources and chapters that would be good starting points. I had quite a few intelligent classmates who agreed that the PBL process should have been more gradual: Make it more didactically heavy in the beginning, teach people HOW to teach themselves, and then gradually ease up.
  24. 2 points
    greysweater

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    There is so much administration that goes into sending offers off the waitlist I think. Not only do they have to coordinate the different dates that currently accepted students' offers expire, but who has accepted and who is late on stuff, but there are also students that randomly drop out if they get an OOP offer, etc. So they have to take inventory all the time on a rolling basis of how many people they have secured and not (and these all have different timelines) I think they juggle alot. So a couple people's offers may expire 1 day, not again for a few other days, someone may drop out randomly. They're answering emails all the time from students that are already accepted trying to get their paperwork in so I think they fit in the waitlist offers on a rolling basis as they arise. And there's not much pressure to push out waitlist offers ASAP. Because historically, they have until end of June/early July to do this and these are the timelines they have been given by their department probably. I think they just send out when they can and as they can.
  25. 2 points
    DrHopes

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    okay so here's what Chantal answered................................................................ exactly the same as english and I asked specifically for french.......... Bonjour, Merci pour votre courriel et pour votre patience. Il n’y a actuellement pas beaucoup de mouvement sur la liste d’attente car nous sommes très près d’avoir une classe complète. Dès que tous les places seront acceptées, nous enverrons certainement un courriel générique à tous ceux et celles qui restent sur la liste d’attente pour les informer. Cordialement, Chantal
  26. 2 points
    pharmyveg1

    2020 - 2021 New guidelines

    I strongly urge you all to email admissions if you feel this is not fair!! Here is who I emailed: admissionsdean.med at mcgill.ca admissions.med at mcgill.ca
  27. 2 points
    The gunner mentality itself doesn't hurt your chances, it's just an issue with higher chances of dealing with annoying people like you said lol. U of T would definitely not hurt your chances for competitive residencies.
  28. 2 points
    Il semblerait que la mise à jour de la LA du 15 juin soit déjà disponible ..... bien qu'on soit le 11 juin... Rien n'a changé pour LA bac connexe, elle se situe toujours au rang 21. https://admission.umontreal.ca/fileadmin/fichiers/documents/liste_attente/LA.pdf https://admission.umontreal.ca/admission/apres-la-demande/recevoir-une-reponse/ Ceux qui ont eu une offre durant la 2ème vague (26 mai) ont jusqu'au vendredi 12 juin pour donner leur réponse. Peut-être de nouvelles offres seront envoyées lundi 15 juin?
  29. 2 points
    Have you considered that maybe your personal strengths just happened to align more with your arts degree than your science degree? It's freaking HARD to get as as good a GPA in arts/humanities courses than in the sciences... in STEM, it's fully possible to get a 100% perfect mark in most courses. Obviously most people aren't going to achieve this, but at least it's doable. This is very much not the case in the vast majority of arts and humanities courses. There are so many wildly subjective aspects to the grading-- not to mention to huge volume of reading and critical analysis skills required to do well, vs. rote memorization which can get you through a pretty significant portion of a typical Life Sciences degree. Yes, medicine is absolutely nepotistic and still favours privileged applications in many ways. But don't conflate this with your apparent disdain for the arts (or people who study them), and how they're apparently supposed to be less academically rigorous.
  30. 2 points
    drone

    Etudiant "anglophone" en med

    I agree. Personally, an added challenge is that I communicate in three languages daily, so I'm always translating to English when addressing issues in other languages. I went to perform a self-assessment of medical french, and despite having some comfort with this area at work, I needed a bit more time to translate scientific and medical terminologies. For example: when reading about respiratory physiology, it took me a bit to recognize that "le cornet nasale" is referring to the nasal conchae - not an ice cream cone . Personally, I am not gambling with my time during med school to play catch-up with French, so I'm slowly immersing myself in French. I'm actually considering moving to Quebec City a month earlier. Here is the link summarizing notes from Quebec medical schools. https://wikimedi.ca/wiki/ I'm currently using it to acclimate myself to medical french. Have fun!
  31. 2 points
    LanPham

    PharmD 2020

    (en date du 15 juin selon le bas de la page) https://admission.umontreal.ca/fileadmin/fichiers/documents/liste_attente/LA.pdf collégien: 92 universitaire: 52 NB: 4 ON: 0
  32. 2 points
    adm2020

    DMD 2020

    Dans le lien pour voir ton rang dans la LA, il y a un autre lien que tu peux cliquer pour voir le rang de toutes les autres LA. Essaye ce lien ai t’arrive pas :https://admission.umontreal.ca/fileadmin/fichiers/documents/liste_attente/LA.pdf
  33. 2 points
    Mr. A

    Optométrie 2020

    Mise a jour: LA universitaire —> 4e LA Collégienne —> 22e (ya pas trop de monde sur le thread mais je mets ca pour avoir ces info s’il y en a qui vont faire une demande l’an prochain)
  34. 2 points
    I'd probably guess York University. The GTA is the largest population center in NA to only have 1 medical school and there certainly are a number of hospitals that currently are underutilized while others across the province are packed with medical students. It would be a massive undertaking however, turning community hospitals into teaching hospitals would ruffle a lot of feathers. Given the general supply of doctors in Canada however, I would probably start it off with 100 students a year and take those positions from the other Ontario schools.
  35. 2 points
    newmy88

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    I’m kinda wishing I didn’t email because I’ve just been bummed all day lol. The truth hurts Even if it doesn’t happen this year, we will pick ourselves up and try again and come back better and stronger next year.
  36. 2 points
    Here is a blog post that links to 2 studies that confirm the overwhelming majority of students come from a high SES background. Please be careful when making such statements as it perpetuates the idea that entry to medical school is equally challenging from students of all backgrounds when, in fact, it is not. https://cmajblogs.com/addressing-the-income-gap-in-medical-school/
  37. 2 points
    moi aussi mon dossier est passé à l’étude!! je suis 4e sur la liste et j’ai rien reçu encore
  38. 2 points
    Interesting discussion, I rarely post here anymore but I would like to give my two cents from my experience as someone who is still struggling to get in and also a minority. First, I want to say that I'm really happy to see more black students get in, it gives me hope as a first generation immigrant who moved to Canada after high school, and is still struggling to get in med school, which is my (and my family's) life-long dream. I think my case is quite interesting because I am not black, but I am African (North African, from a country that is officially considered developing and of a lower economic status), and I'm very proud of my African heritage. I have experienced uncountable hardships and discrimination acts during my academic career and they definitely put me at a disadvantage compared to the average applicant (White or non-White), in fact being a first generation immigrant who did high school in another country is a huge struggle on its own. Yet, I cannot apply through BSAP, because I'm not black (Even though I'm African, but you can imagine how awkward, fake and imposer I would feel going to a BSAP interview day with a fair olive skin. I know U of T says you can still apply, but trust me it is super uncomforting and awkward). Therefore, I really wish such programs were more inclusive of underprivileged people. I really wish such programs were more focused on helping underprivileged applicants based on measures like socioeconomic status or family conditions etc rather than being restricted to skin color (and that's what many top universities in the US are shifting to). I know for a fact that black folks are definitely discriminated and underprivileged even in Canada, but I also personally know examples of people who took advantage of such programs solely because of their ethnicity, even though they had a very luxurious and top quality education and bringing up because they come from rich and powerful families (Yes rich black families do exist, same as poor white families). And that's the problem with such ethnicity based affirmative actions, that often times the individuals who benefit from such initiatives are not really the ones those programs were designed to help or support. Lastly, I want to say that I definitely do not mean to undermine accepted black students who got through BSAP, I have no doubt that they will go on to be great doctors. But a common problem with affirmative actions is that they usually put so much focus on representation and ignore individual interest and fairness to applicants. It is not about whether BSAP students will be successful or not, I'm 100% sure they will be. It is more about the support and fairness underprivileged applicants need. Affirmative actions can be very useful if applied in an inclusive way and accompanied by other equally important measures, that's just my opinion at least. Regardless, I would like to congratulate BSAP students who got in and wish best of luck for those who didn't make it this cycle.
  39. 2 points
    DrOtter

    worried about fitting in

    reading this honestly warms my heart so much. I'm a new immigrant too from a developing country. My parents are from the healthcare background at home but here they're just blue-collar workers on minimum wages. We've been living modestly my entire life and I have found it slightly difficult in the past to mix with my more affluent peers in different programs I found myself in. I have been just a little anxious about how I would fit in in med school but if my past experiences have been any indication, you finally find your clique with people (not necessarily from the same background) who appreciate you for you are and share similar interests. I agree with previous posts about how we should all go in with an open mind and be willing to step out of our comfort zones a little bit e.g. going on hikes with classmates, going out for dinner, having study parties (very nerdy lol) etc. I also found that when I was in a high-stress program in undergrad, everyone just kinda huddled together over the common anxiety and I'm really hoping med would be even more of that. But yeah, you are definitely not alone and the journey you've gone through to get to this point speaks volumes of your adaptability and resilience. Most people I've met who are in med school are nice and approachable so I don't doubt we will be able to find our belonging there. Best wishes for your future and I'm so grateful to have colleagues like you!
  40. 2 points
    kwrgvnq

    worried about fitting in

    Hi, I know exactly how you feel. And your story is not as rare and unique as it may seem. I myself am also Muslim woman of colour and the anxiety I feel about fitting in with my classmates is real. But you got into med school. You out competed hundreds of applicants regardless of the hardships that you have gone through. You have achieved what many people can only dream of. The fact that you got into med school despite your circumstances means that you belong here. Everyone who got into med school is unique and different and belongs exactly where they are. You will without a doubt find groups of people you feel comfortable around, friendships you never thought possible, and hopefully a family among your medical school classmates. We are all in this together and if you come in with the mentality that you will not fit in, you likely will block yourself off from potential connections with your fellow students. Keep your head up. You deserve this and you will more than fit in if you give yourself the chance to get to know your other classmates.
  41. 2 points
  42. 2 points
    Result: Accepted (VFMP) off the Wait-list 6/8/2020 Geography: IP Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Timestamp: 3:45 PM PST aGPA: 85.1% ~22.5 AQMCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 513 (128/126/129/130)Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): SFU Molecular Biology and Biochemistry 2015 ECs: ~34 NAQ last year. Various things: Volunteered at shelters, Big Brother, some clinical volunteering, NSERC (no pubs), helped the elderly, charities etc etc etc. My application included a lot of my hobbies as I tried to paint a picture of who I really am: I like wrenching on cars so I restored an old Japanese car. I really enjoy photography, and drawing. I also repaired computers and phones on the side. I provided evidence for all my hobbies with links (an album for example). I've had quite a few jobs as well from selling cars to manual labor. For example when the town of Fort Mcmurray burned down I lived in a camp near there for 2 months to help with the clean up. Interview: 7 stations went okay, bombed 2 stations (I might as well have gone in there and screeched for 7 minutes). My essay wasn't great. I can't believe I am posting this. After 4 applications of straight rejections and 4 MCATs, I finally got wait listed and accepted in the 5th application and 3rd interview. This has been...quite a long and difficult journey. You can look back on my 8 year old account and see all the times when I lost hope completely or when I was researching schools in Poland/Australia/D.O. Schools. No way in hell I expected this. I had completely given up. Last year I quit my job and practiced 250-400 hours for the interview and got below average and rejected. I had practiced with residents, med students, other applicants, professors, teachers, my parents, friends, I gave it my everything so to be rejected like that was a clear message that I am not cut out to be a doctor. I moved on completely. I decided to do a second degree in Computer Science, nothing even health care related. The past 10 years of my life were considered forfeit. I talked to an advisor at SFU about CS requirements and he told me I have everything I need for Jan 2020 intake. Two weeks later as I am applying, they changed their requirements to needing more math courses, I was no longer qualified and UBC's BCS (CS) program wasn't until next September. I was in complete despair at this point. I felt like anything I tried to do with my life, there was a massive obstacle. Like there was some divine force preventing me from progressing while everyone else moved on. It was really hard to not have these negative thoughts. It was the uncertainty around getting into CS for January at SFU that led me to decide to apply to UBC Med one more time, I wasn't planning on it. After UBC MD application was sent in, the CS department decided to ignore their own requirements and admitted me. Finally, I could move on. December comes around and I was surprised to get the interview and grateful, but really did not have the energy or time during my studies to practice like that again. I practiced 2 weeks before the interview and went in. Bombed two stations utterly and completely, and the rest were okay. Nothing as good as my last year's interview. I walked out out LSC thinking to myself this is the last time i'll walk here. A chapter in my life had ended. I just wanted to go home, I had midterms. I didn't even eat the pizza. I didn't think about medical school or the interview again and focused on my studies. In May I get an email that I got waitlisted. I was really surprised but not that excited, given results of the last 4 years, I probably wasn't very high on the list anyways. I was too jaded to be excited. Yesterday was like something out of a dream. I was writing out a strongly worded email to UPS for damaging my car's coilovers when my gmail widget popped up "UBC Undergrad Admis..". I thought it's probably a COVID 19 message or they started rejecting people earlier because the waitlist isn't moving. I opened the email and it said "Congratulations". I stared blankly at the email for 20-30 seconds. I won't go into detail what happened afterwards, you can just imagine what happened. As I trembled for the next hour, I thought to myself...they made a mistake. There's no way. How? The interview was awful. How did this happen. There's got to be a mistake. It honestly still hasn't sunk in yet. I am not going to write that perseverance pays off. This could've easily gone the other way and I know many for whom it did not pay off. Despite all the years of applying and taking rejection after rejection and seriously starting to think there's something wrong with me, I still think I got very lucky. There are risks to pursuing this path. I always thought not having backup would make me more motivated for volunteering and doing well in school and that might have been true, but I think the only thing that changed this year was my attitude towards the whole thing ( I didn't do anything new compared to the previous year's application, just a few more hours in what I already had). I didn't have desperation in my eyes anymore, the interview was taking up my time that could've been used for my midterms. The prospects and promises of the CS degree seemed a lot more realistic vs going up against a hyper competitive application pool. I had other plans, I was pursuing something else at the same time. Something else I enjoyed, but it wasn't necessarily my dream. The outcome of this interview was no longer a zero sum game. It wasn't really as important as last year when there was so much to lose. It had become something I had to do. And perhaps that attitude is something they like. Perhaps it comes off as being more confident. If future applicants have questions about my ECs feel free to PM me! I look forward to meeting my classmates soon! (well with covid...maybe soon?)
  43. 2 points
    dh.

    weird feeling

    I’m 33, and I start this fall.
  44. 1 point
    This. I'd advise practicing dictating whenever you can in med school and residency, although at first when you're learning it's even more time-consuming than typing. Some people end up typing their notes out then read it into the dictaphone, I'd say try not to do that as much as possible since doing dictations from rough notes will help you improve your dictation skill faster. Over time as you get used to dictating you will a) develop a mental template and key phrases so that you don't have to spend as much time thinking of what to say and b) realize that on paper, it doesn't look as bad as it sounds to you. To answer your q OP slow typing might make it a bit painful at hospitals where it's the norm for notes to be typed, or hospitals that don't give trainees dictation access. A few people get Dragon (it's a dictation software with a dedicated dictaphone) during training, but most don't until they're staff.
  45. 1 point
    DrHopes

    2020 Waitlist Thread

  46. 1 point
    FÉLICITATIONS!!! BIENVENUE PARMI NOUS, J'AI HÂTE DE VOUS VOIR EN VRAIII
  47. 1 point
    Rusty Verdigris

    Final Transcript Status

    I sent mine by mail ~3 weeks ago, and it says it has not been received yet. I'm not going to start worrying about it until the end of the month.
  48. 1 point
    I really hope it goes well for you and glad to hear you have supportive counsel! Nonetheless, I'd encourage to continue to look into parallel strategies that you outlined in your first post to resume your career to see how to use your PGY status to your advantage to complete your training. I'd also suggest keeping an open mind with respect to settlement offers; unfortunately, I've also seen first-hand almost everything being lost through unsuccessful litigation.
  49. 1 point
    That's true. Family doctors can certainly niche their practices into something more specialized, but I feel it's not really answering the question that was posed. The OP is largely referring to career satisfaction derived from family medicine in its most traditional, comprehensive care form.
  50. 1 point
    BernieMac

    Admitted but never kissed a girl

    this is the most cringe story/advice I have ever heard. OP please ignore this
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