Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/08/2014 in Posts

  1. 68 points
    BernieMac

    May 12 Countdown Thread 2020

    -
  2. 35 points
    Butterfly_

    Success Stories- Non Trad Style!

    This thread inspired me and gave me hope to pursue my medical school dream. Thank you to all that have posted on here before. You have all truly touched my heart. It is because of your stories, that today, I also have the pleasure of posting here and sharing my own journey. When I was younger and about to head to university, I had a tough time choosing between pursuing a business degree or a science degree. At that time, I knew my interests were in biology and psychology, but seeing my parents labouring hard on the farm, I felt pressured to help support the family and make money fast. So, I decided to pursue a finance degree, work in investment banking, and provide enough money to make my family comfortable, then pursue my interests afterward. It was a naïve and misguided plan. From the first moment in business school, I already felt like I didn’t fit in. This feeling got worse 4 years later when I began working in investment banking. The hours were grueling, and I was completely uninterested in what I was doing. I kept at it for 2.5 years because it helped me pay my debts, supported my family, and made my parents proud. But one day, I reached my breaking point. I was out of shape, burnt out, and depressed. I woke up dreading the new day to begin. So, I finally quit, at the shock of my parents. They didn’t understand why I would give up a lucrative and prestigious career. I didn’t know how to explain it to them either. So, I decided to travel. Backpacked by myself across Southeast Asia for 6 months. When I was in Cambodia wandering the night markets, I walked past a bookstand selling novels for $1 USD. Not sure if it was fate or intuition, but I chose to buy the book The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. It was a book that changed my life. It helped me rediscover my passion and interests in life. I started focusing on things that I loved to do. Travel. Eat. Exercise. Health. Science. Languages. During this process of self-discovery, I developed a strong interest in healthcare and medicine. However, I was still too afraid to pursue it. The time, the commitment, and the financial burden all seemed too daunting. I also convinced myself that I wasn’t good enough to be a doctor. That I wouldn’t be able to handle the responsibilities that came with life and death. So, I became a travel agent instead. I had a lot of fun, met many amazing people, and excelled at the role. I traveled to over 35 countries. Life was exciting, and I felt content. However, the idea of medicine never left my mind. It kept gnawing at me every day and I eventually began to feel too comfortable at my job. It was at this time I met my fiancée (on Tinder, lol.) He was in his 3rd year of pharmacy and applying to medicine at the same time. His mother was a nurse. His grandmother was a military doctor. I was suddenly immersed in a world of healthcare. Watching my fiancée work hard and challenge himself every day made something click in me. I started to think that I might still have a chance at medical school. Couple months later, I went on a Mediterranean cruise with my family. I was sitting in the hot tub and decided to strike up a conversation with the person next to me. We talked, and he asked me what I did. I'm not sure what came over me, but for the first time in my life, I told someone out loud, "I'm going to become a doctor." It was a liberating moment. Everything suddenly felt real and achievable. And fate would have it, the person whom I was talking was an army doctor who graduated from McGill Medical School. He was traveling with his wife in Europe before beginning his next station in the UK. He said, "Go for it!" And I did. I quit my job in December 2016 and began studying for the MCAT full time. I also enrolled in 2 semesters of English to obtain enough credits to meet the UBC admission requirements. After 5 years without reading a textbook, it was a brutal transition. And with zero science prerequisites under my belt, it was so much harder than I thought. Furthermore, some of my friends and family did not take me seriously and discouragingly told me not to "waste my time." It was a challenging few months. Many days, I felt overwhelmed. But, I survived due to a wonderful support network. I listened to those who believed in me and ignored the ones who were negative. I acknowledged my weaknesses and sought help and advice. I studied 8-10 hours a day, 6 days a week, for 7 months and self-taught myself the sciences. I took the exam in July 2017 and achieved a score of 508. It was below the average admission score, but good enough to give the application a try. I applied widely to as many schools as I could. 5 schools rejected me. 3 schools interviewed me. And a miracle happened. I got an acceptance. It was an unbelievable moment. I felt all the worry, pain, and doubt just wash away. All the time I spent, all the risks I took, all the sacrifices I made, paid off. Everything was worth it and I was the happiest girl in the world. Finally, at 27 years old, I will begin medical school in Fall of 2018. The moral of my story: Don’t ever let anyone tell you what you can or cannot achieve. Only you can decide that for yourself. Also, remember that: "We are, at any moment, capable of pursuing our dreams... And, when you want something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it." - The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho If medicine is your dream, don't give up. Never, ever give up.  I sincerely wish you the best of luck on your journey.
  3. 34 points
    La 3e vague est sortie! and guess what? I'M INNNNNNNNNNNNN Merci guys!!!!! I couldn't have done it without y'all <3333 I'm over the moon right now, jpx pas me calmer fuckkkkk
  4. 34 points
    SoraAde

    Female advice needed, thank you

    Find a place where you're not going to be interrupted by other people, then start small talk etc, show you're interested.. then when the silence hits, tell her you have a 4.0 GPA and 132 CARS. She'll ask you for your number
  5. 33 points
    After 6 years of applying to UBC Medicine... going through all the possibilities (regrets before interview, to regrets after interview, to regrets after waitlist, to being ineligible for 2 whole years), I seriously cannot believe I'm writing this... It had always seemed like it's something too good to be true, yet here I am. There are many people I would like to thank (and letting them know will take a solid week) from the bottom of my heart for the support, encouragement, and love they have provided me within this long and incredible journey I have been through. I write this with shock, excitement, and full of heart. TIME STAMP: 11:56 AM PST (May 10, 2019) Result: ACCEPTED VFMP (1st choice) !! Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Deadline GPA or AGPA (if applicable): ~84% MCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 514 – (130 / 125 / 130 / 129) Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): BSc in 2014 Geography (IP/OOP): IP Extracurricular Activities (awards, achievements, volunteering, employment, research, etc.): I had written this description already in a separate post I made, but will be copying it here as well: Founded and lead a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for variety of causes via annual musical concerts, with the last 2 events focused on contributing to schizophrenia (5 years and counting); founded and led another charity aiding developing nations via Save the Children fund (6 years); extensive leadership and volunteering with UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy (8.5 years and counting); long-term ER volunteer and volunteer trainer and program coordinator (8.5 years and counting); long-term St. John Ambulance volunteer and Divisional Administration Officer (2000+ hours over 5 years, and counting); independently provide guidance and support to immigrants and families as they adjust to life in Vancouver/Canada (9+ years and counting); lots and lots of capacity to work with others including skin cancer research/holding workshops for high school students across Metro Vancouver, volunteering with med students and residents via UBC Department of Emergency Medicine, working closely with refugees and youth with physical and/or intellectual disabilities, and more (combined 3300+ hours); and lots and lots of diversity including clinical research as a volunteer, shadowing pediatric surgeons, toxicology research as a volunteer, epigenomics research at Michael Smith Labs, loads of piano and competitions, oil painting, and more. I also work 3 jobs right now, 1 full-time and 2 part-time jobs; full-time is being a research assistant at UBCH working on a project focused on treatment-refractory schizophrenia (over 2 years); part-time jobs include tutoring students in grade 4-12 in math and academic reading with a company, and also tutoring for the MCAT with a company. 1 Publication (1st author) on the application (had a poster publication/presentation on June 7th which couldn't be included unfortunately, and a few are expected to come soon). Lots of awards (mainly from high school) and one high performance activity for winning multiple awards with St. John Ambulance. The intention of this post is to try and help people down the line, so that's why I'm including lots of details. Interview: I finished my interview initially feeling good about my answers. I had a terrific interview experience! I felt each interviewer was well engaged in my responses and discussions; they all smiled and nodded as I was answering questions and follow-ups. But then the 3-month period started and man oh man oh man was I second-guessing myself... I kept doubting my answers and my confidence started to drop a little bit each week that had passed. I knew at minimum I did 5/10 stations that I would categorize as "good" and at absolute most 8/10 stations. But overall, especially leading to D-Day, I was completely unsure how I did, but I don't know if I was being too self-critical or not. At the end of the day, I still overthought everything haha. Turned out to be okay I guess! I would like to sincerely congratulate everyone who received an offer this year and sincerely congratulate in advance those who will be receiving offers from the waitlist! It's an overwhelmingly amazing feeling that I get a chance to be in class with you folks – I cannot wait to meet each and every one of you as we finally set to make our dreams become a reality . For those who didn't receive the news they were hoping for, I can definitely understand how you feel, believe me... Disappointing news can be demoralizing, but let me tell you that you were selected to interview for a reason; you all have incredible potential so please keep your chin held up high and do not allow, even for a single moment, a decision to define who you are. As my case can further add to the supporting evidence, persistence is absolutely key.
  6. 33 points
    Just got accepted to VFMP!!!!! I am in tears... I am in so much tears.... I just can't... I just can't even process this..... oh ... my.. god... I am still shocked this is unbelievable...
  7. 33 points
    TIME STAMP: 9:00AM Result: Admitted with Condition (MDCM) cGPA: 3.80, pre-reqGPA: 3.4 MCAT: Not submitted ECs: Lots. Year: B.Sc. + B. Sc. + M. Sc. Interview preparation : Did 0 preparation. Not a single book. Nothing. Post-interview feeling right after : I had no regrets and I was proud. That was enough for me. Post-interview feeling weeks after : You start to question everything. That's normal. Let it go. Attempt : Fourth attempt IP/OOP/International: IP I never thought I would ever post on here. I was already enrolled for next semester to re-take my pre-requesites and I had paid the tuition for it. I had accepted that I would be refused. It is very hard to summarize a 10 years long journey in a few sentences. I could write a book about my journey, my feelings and my doubts. If I had to give advice to a future applicant, here is what I would say : Before getting accepted, try to accept the idea that it might never happen. Define yourself beyond your medical path. Don't do things because they would look good on a C.V. Live your life. Take every extra year as an opportunity to grow your life. Don't see it as an extra year of suffering and waiting. When you get accepted, everything makes sense. Every doubt you had suddenly turns into sparks of hope. It is very hard to describe. After you get accepted, life feels lighter but you realize that it's another journey that starts. I wish I could explain myself but I had the worst odds against me and I made it. Not because I am unique. Because I was lucky. I truly believe I am. Therefore, if it is your dream, follow your heart and never give up. Never give up. Never ever give up.
  8. 32 points
    Result: Accepted (VFMP) off the Wait-list 6/8/2020 Geography: IP Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Timestamp: 3:45 PM PST aGPA: 85.1% ~22.5 AQMCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 513 (128/126/129/130)Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): SFU Molecular Biology and Biochemistry 2015 ECs: ~34 NAQ last year. Various things: Volunteered at shelters, Big Brother, some clinical volunteering, NSERC (no pubs), helped the elderly, charities etc etc etc. My application included a lot of my hobbies as I tried to paint a picture of who I really am: I like wrenching on cars so I restored an old Japanese car. I really enjoy photography, and drawing. I also repaired computers and phones on the side. I provided evidence for all my hobbies with links (an album for example). I've had quite a few jobs as well from selling cars to manual labor. For example when the town of Fort Mcmurray burned down I lived in a camp near there for 2 months to help with the clean up. Interview: 7 stations went okay, bombed 2 stations (I might as well have gone in there and screeched for 7 minutes). My essay wasn't great. I can't believe I am posting this. After 4 applications of straight rejections and 4 MCATs, I finally got wait listed and accepted in the 5th application and 3rd interview. This has been...quite a long and difficult journey. You can look back on my 8 year old account and see all the times when I lost hope completely or when I was researching schools in Poland/Australia/D.O. Schools. No way in hell I expected this. I had completely given up. Last year I quit my job and practiced 250-400 hours for the interview and got below average and rejected. I had practiced with residents, med students, other applicants, professors, teachers, my parents, friends, I gave it my everything so to be rejected like that was a clear message that I am not cut out to be a doctor. I moved on completely. I decided to do a second degree in Computer Science, nothing even health care related. The past 10 years of my life were considered forfeit. I talked to an advisor at SFU about CS requirements and he told me I have everything I need for Jan 2020 intake. Two weeks later as I am applying, they changed their requirements to needing more math courses, I was no longer qualified and UBC's BCS (CS) program wasn't until next September. I was in complete despair at this point. I felt like anything I tried to do with my life, there was a massive obstacle. Like there was some divine force preventing me from progressing while everyone else moved on. It was really hard to not have these negative thoughts. It was the uncertainty around getting into CS for January at SFU that led me to decide to apply to UBC Med one more time, I wasn't planning on it. After UBC MD application was sent in, the CS department decided to ignore their own requirements and admitted me. Finally, I could move on. December comes around and I was surprised to get the interview and grateful, but really did not have the energy or time during my studies to practice like that again. I practiced 2 weeks before the interview and went in. Bombed two stations utterly and completely, and the rest were okay. Nothing as good as my last year's interview. I walked out out LSC thinking to myself this is the last time i'll walk here. A chapter in my life had ended. I just wanted to go home, I had midterms. I didn't even eat the pizza. I didn't think about medical school or the interview again and focused on my studies. In May I get an email that I got waitlisted. I was really surprised but not that excited, given results of the last 4 years, I probably wasn't very high on the list anyways. I was too jaded to be excited. Yesterday was like something out of a dream. I was writing out a strongly worded email to UPS for damaging my car's coilovers when my gmail widget popped up "UBC Undergrad Admis..". I thought it's probably a COVID 19 message or they started rejecting people earlier because the waitlist isn't moving. I opened the email and it said "Congratulations". I stared blankly at the email for 20-30 seconds. I won't go into detail what happened afterwards, you can just imagine what happened. As I trembled for the next hour, I thought to myself...they made a mistake. There's no way. How? The interview was awful. How did this happen. There's got to be a mistake. It honestly still hasn't sunk in yet. I am not going to write that perseverance pays off. This could've easily gone the other way and I know many for whom it did not pay off. Despite all the years of applying and taking rejection after rejection and seriously starting to think there's something wrong with me, I still think I got very lucky. There are risks to pursuing this path. I always thought not having backup would make me more motivated for volunteering and doing well in school and that might have been true, but I think the only thing that changed this year was my attitude towards the whole thing ( I didn't do anything new compared to the previous year's application, just a few more hours in what I already had). I didn't have desperation in my eyes anymore, the interview was taking up my time that could've been used for my midterms. The prospects and promises of the CS degree seemed a lot more realistic vs going up against a hyper competitive application pool. I had other plans, I was pursuing something else at the same time. Something else I enjoyed, but it wasn't necessarily my dream. The outcome of this interview was no longer a zero sum game. It wasn't really as important as last year when there was so much to lose. It had become something I had to do. And perhaps that attitude is something they like. Perhaps it comes off as being more confident. If future applicants have questions about my ECs feel free to PM me! I look forward to meeting my classmates soon! (well with covid...maybe soon?)
  9. 32 points
    So update for any interested parties. I matched to Family Medicine! Always liked living life on the edge, but I'll admit this was cutting it close. I can still accomplish my goals through this route, just have to take a different path than initially intended. Thanks for all of the advice.
  10. 31 points
    BernieMac

    May 12 Countdown Thread 2020

    -
  11. 31 points
    Dear all current applicants and prospective applicants to UBC Medicine, My name is Neurophiliac as I’m obsessed with brains (in a good way, trust me ). I wanted to take this time to explain my story especially for those who haven’t received good news from UBC this year. In doing so, I am hoping that my story can become your inspiration to hold your head high, your motivation to push through with 100% of your energy, and your encouragement to consider not giving up. I want to put an emphasis on the consider part. As I’ve mentioned before, I absolutely have no right to tell you “hey, don’t give up”. After all, everyone has their own challenges that are unique to them, in which no one can fully comprehend or empathize with. But, I wish to ask of you for one thing: to please try. Please try to consider not giving up. Even when life seems impossible, if there is a will, there is a way. Later, I will get into some details of how to improve your NAQ via better application planning and writing. I hope what I share also helps prospective applicants to UBC Medicine to some degree. Story time. This is going to be a SUPER LONG one, so find a nice and comfortable seat, relax and maybe grab a nice cup of tea if you're wanting to read it all . I am a long-term applicant to UBC Medicine. This application is my 6th try, and it all started back in 2013/2014. That year, I submitted my first application to UBC Medicine while I was finishing up my final year of undergrad. I had a bunch of volunteering experiences, but wasn’t having high hopes for my application being successful. Sure enough, I received regrets pre-interview. I was quite disappointed, but thought of the bright side: At least, this was a great experience to familiarize myself with the application. In 2014, I met a variety of health care professionals and was given opportunities to pursue research, awesome volunteering positions, and much more, all of which I am most grateful to this day. I started brainstorming how I can make a positive impact on my community. One thing led to another and with the help of a small group of friends, I founded my own non-profit organization dedicated to helping communities via coordinating annual fundraising musical concerts and donating 100% of the proceeds to great causes. For the first year, my team members and I dedicated our event to my local hospital’s ER, as I was familiar with the ER since I had been volunteering there since 2011. The 2014/2015 application cycle came along, and I was excited to see how this application would turn out. I spent a lot of time carefully writing my application, rewording each entry, making sure the description is concise yet filled with details. When the interview status D-Day arrived, I was in tears of joy when I realized I received my first invite for UBC. Simply put, I could NOT stop dancing, so you can easily imagine the scene . I spent the next 2 months practicing for my interview, attended the large practice sessions and so on and so forth. In May, I was way more nervous than I had been for my interview notification. I decided to shut off my phone from the night before, check on Premed101 in the morning to see when everyone had received their results, and then to turn on my phone again. I did, but realized it was a rejection. I was devastated. I had a flashback of everything I had been through, knowing that I would need to repeat it all again. A week or two passed, and my head was cleared. My optimism resurfaced, and I realized what an accomplishment I’ve made: My NAQ had increased by ~10 points, from 24 (previous year) to ~34 (that year). Giving up now? No way, Jose! During that year, I did a whole bunch of new things ultimately enjoying what I did (as I still do), and as a byproduct it also helped my application. So, for the 2015/2016 application cycle, I spent more than 1 month to complete my application. I planned how to write every new entry, reworded my previous entries, and looked at all the details involved; once my application was complete, I also remodified it several times. When the interview notifications were released, I was ecstatic to know that I received another interview! Very much prepared, I decided to host the MMI Facebook group as I learned a lot from the individual leading the previous Facebook group from the previous year. I was so happy to meet some new people and also some of those who were reapplicants, in the same shoes as I was. Amidst the joy, there was one thing that had always been bothering me: My MCAT score. My old score was a mere 30, very mediocre. I sought guidance from my parents and they convinced me to sign up for an MCAT prep course – this was primarily because the new MCAT was rolled out, and I realized perhaps taking a prep course will prepare me for the new, tougher, longer exam. It was a very strange feeling to prepare for the interview and study for the MCAT again… something I did way back when I was preparing myself to begin my first application. I decided to study for the MCAT and write it in case things go south post-interview. Interview day came along, and I was ready. I did the best I could do and realized how different my interview experience was compared to the previous year; in other words, I felt a lot more confident. When offer notifications were about to be released in May, I was a mess – emotional rollercoaster since the second I woke up in the morning at 7 AM. I anxiously awaited my results. When the rejections wave passed and I got no notification, I suddenly felt an infinite spike of optimism and hope. But it was short-lived. At the time of the waitlist wave, I got a “ding!” on my phone and I knew what it was. I open my email and I see the subject line “UBC Undergrad Admissions: Application Status – Waitlist” and my heart sinks. Had I just survived that couple minutes of the wave, I would have been 180˚ different. Time passed and my head was cleared. I said, “Hey, this isn’t so bad! There is still hope, why am I so down?” I was grateful to have improved from last cycle at least. But the hope gradually dissipated when I wasn’t able to receive an offer from the waitlist. I improved from a Below Average to an Above Average, and my NAQ stayed at roughly ~34. Now, it was MCAT time. The next application cycle (2016/2017) for UBC, Admissions was allowing a final cycle where old MCAT exams were still being accepted. One of my very close friends who got accepted off the waitlist strongly advised me not to write the new MCAT, and just reapply and see what happens. God forbid, if I would get an ineligible score for UBC, none of my old MCAT exams would qualify as only the new attempt(s) count. But I was sure that my MCAT had to be the one thing holding me back. So, I registered for a late-June exam and started prepping my application for the early deadline. Late-June 2016 came and I was sitting at the exam centre at 7:30 AM, waiting to be registered. Wrote the exam, felt like crap, but somehow, I decided to score it – after all, I had put a lot of effort into it and spent a lot of money for my prep course, and I was sure that at least I got the minimums for UBC, so everything was going to be fine, right…? No…. Things didn’t turn out to be fine. My science sections were average but passing, just got the passing score on psych/soc with 124, but… but… but… I realized my CARS was 121 (the damn verbal reasoning, the bane of my existence, the archnemesis of my soul). It was freaking panic time now. I quickly registered for a late-August exam to at least get a passing score so that I am at least eligible. Late-August, 7:30 AM, same exam centre. The guy looks at me and says, “Oh hey, you were here before, right?” And I say with an uncomfortable laugh, “Oh yes, I’m trying to get a better score hopefully!” Wrote the exam, and felt actually a bit better about the CARS section. I still knew it was going to be horrible, but hopefully at least I get that 124. I go home and work on my application for the next week, finalize it and submit it for the early deadline. Late-September arrives. I am at my computer on the AAMC MCAT score release log-in screen. I enter my username, password, and click log in. I place a sheet of paper on my screen hiding all scores. The plan is to check chem/phys first, then bio, then psych/soc, and finally CARS. Chem/phys, bio, and psych/soc are all great actually – much better than before. I take the sheet of paper and unhide my CARS score. What…? Huh…? Surprise turns to disbelief, disbelief turns to anger, anger turns to panic and utter… utter fear. I see 119 besides CARS. How is this even possible…? You mean, I seriously got 1 point above the absolute minimum?? How… HOW… HOW?! Frustration, anger, panic. My head was exploding, blood pressure was low, and I was cold-sweating all over my body. The worse part was that many other bad things had happened to me that year, especially in the summer time. With this news added on, my world felt shattered… With the support of my friends and family, gradually optimism resurfaced again. With the volunteering connections I had built previously, one thing led to another and I transitioned into a full-time research position so smoothly, it felt like the sky opened and this job fell into my hands. In 2016, I started working at UBC Department of Psychiatry on a project focused on exploring the metabolic, genetic and immunological factors affecting those diagnosed with treatment-refractory schizophrenia, one of the most severe forms of mental illness. Also, in 2016, I reconnected with a dear, close friend via my cousin’s wedding who I had lost touch with since we were young. She became a very, very special person in my life. She lives in my previous home country (where I had immigrated from with my family as a child), so we had a long-distance relationship going. With the bad news of the MCAT and other things that were affecting me, suddenly 2016 didn’t seem so bad now. I worked for the whole year, did my volunteering, extracurricular activities and so forth, while restudying for my MCAT. Even though I was prepared, the last couple of exams took a huge toll on my confidence, and I was still very nervous for my exam. I registered for an early summer 2017 exam just in case I don’t make it. I write the exam, don’t know how to feel. My results come out, sciences have all improved even more, but my CARS… 122. Another big hit to my confidence. But hey, it’s okay because I have another opportunity to write an exam, right? I register for another in August 2017, and write the exam, feeling maybe I did it this time. Results come out. Sciences are spectacular, but CARS… 123… why is this happening…? Why is life s***ing on me like this…? You think previous times I had a major hit to my confidence? No way, Jose. This was the biggest hit to my confidence… A score of 123 is basically 1 or 2 correct answers from a 124. I was embarrassed. I felt so disappointed to let down my coworkers, close friends, and family who were all rooting for me. Another year of being ineligible… By the way, these 2 years of being ineligible, I was still applying to UBC because I didn’t want to break my consistency. I wanted UBC to see that I still care and I am still trying, even though they don’t do a file review when you’re ineligible. The fall of 2017 at least became one of the best times of my life. I took vacation from work and my family and I planned a trip to go visit my girlfriend and her family. While there, I proposed to her and I heard the sweetest “Yes” of my life. We had an engagement party and got legally married (on paper), since the two go together in my culture (and the wedding ceremony is usually within a year or two after). I then returned back to Canada soon after because I could only get a short vacation, and started working on her immigration application. I used the year to again work, actually working multiple jobs, doing a whole bunch of volunteering, doing way more than I have ever done to not have it appear that I’ve “plateaued”. Finally, 2018 comes and I start the whole routine of studying for the MCAT… all… over… again. At this point, I’m drenched in volunteering and work, while maintaining my MCAT studying schedule. Again, I register for an early summer exam just in case so that I have another opportunity late August. I write the exam, no idea how CARS went. I get my results back, and yet again… CARS is 123. At this point, my confidence has been kicked around, chipped, and 99% eaten away. But I put these thoughts away and force myself to think positively; after all, it’s only maximum 2 questions away to 124. I have one more chance for this next application cycle for August. Luckily, I’m able to register for another exam for August 25, 2018. Another 7:30 AM at the exam centre. I write it, and something inside ever so slightly tells me… maybe. As soon as the exam is over, I prepare myself to take a vacation to spend a month to visit my wife on the other side of the planet. I really enjoyed the trip; we spent quality time and made memories which will last forever. However, on the inside, mentally my mind is asking the “what if” regarding my CARS. This was my 6th attempt for the new MCAT exam… if this didn’t work, I had to think of something. Perhaps the Caribbean schools, or the European or Australian schools. But what would that mean for my wife? If she immigrated to Canada, where would she stay? Would she come with me? Would she stay in Canada and we have to live a few years of our lives apart other than the short visits? She wants to continue her education in Canada, so her studies matter a lot too. These lingering thoughts bothered me everywhere I went and I was neck-deep in internally-hidden anxiety. When I returned to Canada in late October after my vacation, my exam result had already been released in mid-September yet I hadn’t checked it (only released the scores to UBC). Even the thought of logging into AAMC makes my heart pump hard and sends my thoughts racing. But eventually, I control myself: “I can do it,” I say. I bring up the AAMC MCAT score release website screen, take 5 full, deep breaths before I log in even though I'm nauseous as hell. Again, I hide the scores on the screen with a piece of paper and check each with CARS last. My chem/phys is 130 (wonderful), bio is 130 (excellent), and psych/soc is 129 (wow, best I’ve had!). As I’m about to reveal CARS, internally and externally I start praying for just a 124 or more. I reveal… and… it’s a… 125. 125?! OMG!!! Surprise turns to disbelief, disbelief turns to joy, joy turns to tears and utter… utter happiness. I’ve made it… I’ve made it!!! I instantly feel so much weight, tons and tons of load get released off my shoulders. I can’t believe it finally happened. After 6 whole tries, I can finally be eligible again. And here I am. I have been through every part of the spectrum other than being accepted; rejected pre-interview, to rejected post-interview, to being waitlisted-rejected, to being ineligible. For me, it’s one of the best feelings in the world to be eligible to apply. And now with receiving an interview invitation… I do not even have the words to truly express how thankful and grateful I am. Through this whole process, I have learned one of the hardest ways to never take anything for granted, and always appreciate the things you have in this moment. Even though life seemed impossible, I never stopped fighting for what I really care about; I never gave up. Even if I don’t become accepted this cycle, I will continue to battle the challenges of my life and will not stop pursuing my dream. If medicine is your dream too, don’t let it remain a dream. Continue to push through the dark times because there is always good around you. The experiences that you accumulate in life will eventually aid you to become stronger, more mature, more professional, well-rounded, and more, which primarily help you become successful in life in general, but also with pursuing medicine. Know that whatever you do, you’re not wasting your time. I define “wasting your time” as when you’re sitting on your butt and not doing anything for your future. Down the road, no one will ask when you completed your MD, no one cares that you’re an amazing, experienced physician when you’re 50 as compared to when you could have been 47, for example. Medicine is a life-long career. What really matters is that you enter medical school when you’re ready, because that’s when you can take the most out of your program and be the best future physician you can be. Like I mentioned earlier, anything you do now will ultimately help you in what comes after MD, such as in CaRMS, which is quite important. Lastly, I want to point out one important note. Medicine is very important when it’s your passion. But, there are always things that are way more important than it, such as love, family, and friends. It was through my failures that I met my wife. If I had a choice to reverse time and be accepted to medicine back in 2016/2017 by not re-writing my MCAT (lots of ifs), I would have not taken this offer. Because then I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to gain experience in my work field that I have now, I wouldn’t have met all the wonderful people through my jobs, and most importantly… maybe I wouldn’t have met my wife. This just comes to show that medicine, although a true passion, shouldn't be on a pedestal. As I go with the flow, it will happen when it happens, as long as I don’t give up. Long story short, I strongly encourage you guys to please, at the least, consider not giving up yet. I’m sure you all have your personal challenges, but let my story inspire you. Let your inner optimism resurface, too. Gain the support of your family, relatives, friends, coworkers, and seek their guidance. And please know that I am here – if you’d like to chat, I would love to listen. If I can help in any way, please PM me.
  12. 30 points
    can't think of an opinion i disagree with more tbh. 1. Schools didn't exclude winter2020 grades for people that failed, they did it because it was an outlier. Many people thrived off of cancellations and empathetic professors and had their "first 4.0 semester". This high achievement is attributable to the pandemic and thus, is not a fair data point for peoples' performance. Thus, the most fair approach is to ignore it. 2. Please do not assume you have the competence or experience to occupy high-ranking academic positions in faculties of medicine that have been around longer than many COUNTRIES. I am Black, grew up quite poor and had no mentors or role models through my journey. I still pushed myself through every obstacle required to get into medical schools. I didn't complain, and still don't. Why? Because there are thousands of students who would kill for the chance to be in my position. You think premeds won't happily put themselves through the application process regardless of recent changes? The only revolution that needs to happen is with your attitude.
  13. 29 points
    MDLD

    May 12 Countdown Thread 2020

    Since people found this funny, will update you on what I dreamed last night as it seems to be a continuation of that dream lol.... Dream: So its med acceptance day, but for a weird reason we didn't get emails but instead got letters mailed to us to tell us if we got accepted or not. With the letter is a rubric they used to score our interview. I read my letter and it say rejected but then I start looking at the rubric and realize someone didn't calculate the marks right as the math didn't make sense. Flash forward a bit and I am now at Ottawa talking to the dean about the mistake. He agrees there is a mistake and I should have gotten an offer but says that he can not correct the math. Only my interviewer can correct the math. So the rest of my dream is me trying to find Voldemort so he can correct the stupid rubric... I finally find him and I'm like ... "Mr. Dark Lord, I am sorry to bug you but you forgot to carry the one here..." Then I woke up... Waiting for med acceptances is messing with my head it seems.
  14. 28 points
    littleduck

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Hey guys!!!!! I am literally going crazy right now!!!!! I barely can breath I just got the email from chantal that I got off the waitlist!!!!!!!! I HOPE YOU GUYS HEAR BACK ASAP
  15. 28 points
    I just thought that amongst all this sadness for people who didn't get a spot I'd just share my story as I'm sure some of you can relate and others can hopefully draw some inspiration. Also I just need to vent. This was my 4th cycle, I've gotten in at schools in the US and Europe but I just really wanted to stay in Canada because this is my home. After not getting in post undergrad I did a master's program that has allowed me to obtain a role as a health care professional. I've got over two thousand hours of frontline healthcare experience. All I've ever wanted was an interview to show these schools that I WILL be a great doctor. Just a chance to show them that stats aren't everything (I've got a great GPA, but 126 CARS). Having worked in healthcare, knowing how to talk to patients and working with doctors, nurses and allied health on almost a daily basis, I knew I was ready to slay the interview (despite what Mac said about us thinking we would do better on the interview than we actually would). This year for the first time I got my wish, and got that opportunity..only to ultimately lose out on the chance to show what makes me unique and demonstrate my readiness to be a physician. TO A LOTTERY no less. It's been a really really tough pill to swallow but I'm not giving up just yet. I know that I will be a great physician, it's not a matter of IF but WHEN. As hard as it is let's all keep our heads up. Congrats to everyone that's gotten in. All of this waiting is just going to make it that much sweeter when we are finally there. Peace and love
  16. 28 points
    Well... this story is five years in the making so bear with me for length... It is quite the novel!! I wrote in the forum 2 years ago with hopes of gaining acceptance to UBC... hoping to write in this thread. Turns out it wasn't going to be that year, but finally... FINALLY .... this year. This is the year I get the honour of writing my success story!! For anyone struggling right now, it took me FOUR years of applications to get an acceptance! If you are continually improving yourself and your application/interview skills/grades/etc. stay focused on your goal and hang in there! I am 33 this year and began this journey five years ago while deciding to change careers from environmental/animal biology towards medicine. My first step was to go back to school for some prereqs for UBC during the summer. I had asked for time off from work and was so lucky to receive it. I completed the courses with good grades and began studying for the old MCAT. Then I saw that the MCAT was changing and got crazy stressed out so I signed up for a Princeton Review course to learn what exactly was going to be tested on this new MCAT. I found it difficult to focus my attention 100% on the MCAT as I was concurrently working fulltime. A tragedy struck my family and I had to take a month off from studying, and shortly thereafter decided to quit my safe, full-time job to float by on a part-time job and savings while dedicating myself 100% to my goal and dream: getting a good score on the MCAT and getting into medschool. I pushed my test date ahead once or maybe twice, can't remember, and when finally the day came for my test I arrived sleep-deprived because my cat had been sick all night and it was so hot out that I couldn't sleep... No matter! I scored decently well regardless (511) and forged onward with my first ever set of medical school applications! I applied broadly and received pre-interview rejections from all schools. I hadn't expected much because I knew it takes an average of 3 applications in Canada to get in. That fall (2015) I had gone back to school to take medically-relevant courses as I had not really done so during undergrad (just had done typical bio degree courses) so I had a lot to focus on regardless. I finished those up with awesome grades in April 2016 and began the process of reapplying. I rewrote all of my descriptions for UBC and added new activities and grades. I took some first aid courses and started working as a medic on construction/oil/gas sites. During the 2016-17 cycle I received one interview: UBC. I prepared extensively with the interview groups, taking time from work to focus on preparing. Interview day came and went and I felt confident but not overly hopeful so as to spare myself in case of rejection. Mid-May rolled around and the offers, rejections, and waitlist emails came out and I was gutted to find I had been rejected... No matter! Forging onward. It has only been 2 applications so far anyways... After a brief pity session I regained my composure and determination and set myself up for taking even more university courses and enrolling myself in an additional course that would eventually grant me employment as a paramedic. I felt the fire of my passion fueling me onward: “I will get in” was the feeling. I went back to school again at more than one institution and did a heavy load, full-time and got A+ in most of my classes... “This will be my year”... I got another interview with UBC for Feb 2018. Second interview, third application; this has to be my year! Mid-May 2018: post-interview rejection. “Ok.. I can recover.. I guess. One more try... I have all those courses I did... does that open any doors for me?? Oh, Queen's! McMaster?? Do I take the MCAT again? Ok, let's do that – I really don't want to”... I was scared I would get a worse score somehow... And to have to redo that test and work and ... “Let's just try re-applying again this year without redoing the MCAT... one last shot with this score and then I will re-evaluate”. I begin crafting my OMSAS applications, and re-doing my UBC application. All is well I think. I will probably get my UBC interview at least! (fingers were crossed) and maybe I would score an Ontario interview... December 2018 UBC interview results day comes: PRE-INTERVIEW REJECTION... My TFR dropped over 10-15 points, just like my jaw... my NAQ dropped from mid 30's to in the low 20's... What??? I was shocked... How??? I had added hours, courses, activities, my wording was excellent, I had been receiving interviews for two years in a row????? HOW!!!??? If you look back through the UBC threads around that time you will see that I wasn't doing well with the news and I wasn't expecting much from Queen's either as I had never received an interview with them thus far (I applied during my first application round in 2015-16 also). After feeling low for a few weeks or so I began to slowly gather my broken dream and tried to see a way to improve, again. Fifth time will be the charm I guess, mostly ignoring that I still had apps out in Ontario... I go on vacation to the Caribbean and forget for a while that OMSAS will be releasing interview invites. I don't have much hope but I check my email the morning of the second day of my vacation there to see I had received an interview!!! I cry with happiness!! This cycle may yet provide positive news!! I finish my vacation and return home. I take a month off work and set to focusing on my interview. I watched Ted talks, read, practiced solo and otherwise relaxed. Planned my trip to Ontario and set off in March 2019... The interview felt amazing. I loved the school, the people, the curriculum design... The panel was awesome, and I felt so confident when I got back to my hotel room. I spent the rest of the night in a positive buzz and then came home reservedly hopeful... The wait between interviews and decision day was agonizing... I had started to think about my 'what-ifs' for the year... If I get in – do I buy/rent? Do I get a new car? What about this? What about that? If I don't get in... redo MCAT? Go up north for work? Move to Alberta? Move to Ontario? Start Australia applications? Go to the States? What about Ireland... and on and on and on... to the point where I had considered quitting this goal and beginning to brain-storm alternate careers... I reluctantly decided I would give it one last try before giving up if I didn't get in for this cycle. This process had taken so many years from me and I felt stuck in limbo and stagnant. Mid-May rolls around... Waitlisted... Ok I guess that's better than being outright rejected, but man... MORE WAITING!!! I commit to my daily activities to stay busy. I have some hope but I try not to let it get too high – the waitlist for Queen's notoriously moves a lot, according to historical trends (as noted in the Queen's threads)... Many on the Queen's forum think that the first wave of waitlist offers are coming out May 28, 2 weeks after initial offers... I check my email like a crazy person early in the morning on May 28... and also the forums to see if there was any news yet... I go to bed (in the morning cuz I am a night person) only to be woken an hour later by a gardener with power tools... Okay, well if I am going to be awake for a bit again may as well see how the forum is doing... The waitlist thread is hot... “oh.. jeez, it's happening... let's see – yep people are getting offers. Better rip off the bandaid and check my email...” Queen's School of Medicine----- Oh my god. I don't even have to open this email to know what it is... Dear Clever_Smart_Boy_Like_Me, On behalf of the Admissions Committee of Queen's School of Medicine, we are pleased to provide to you a conditional offer of acceptance... I didn't even read any further than this, I just started sobbing...loudly... with the windows open... someone probably thought something terrible had happened... I start running around in my house sobbing and shaking!! All the years of hard work and determination and sacrifice I had made. All the hours I had spent working at this... Everything I had done in the past five years finally FINALLY paid off... I GOT INTO MEDICAL SCHOOL!! I feel almost moved to tears just writing this sentence. I called my dad and I couldn't even speak, I was just sobbing hysterically into the phone... between sobs I said “I got in” and started losing it again... he came over to my house right away with flowers and a card. I ran around all day telling those important to me that I finally got in. My family and I went to dinner that night to celebrate and I am planning a party to celebrate as well.. Logistics of this process have set in and I am working on all the info I have to provide for the school and getting finances in order and looking for a place to live but... the magnitude of this washes over me randomly throughout the day and I feel so elated and proud and like crying again all over. I AM GOING TO BE A DOCTOR!! I am the first in my immediate family to attend university. And within my family there are not many doctors (though I have learned I have at least 2?). This was a huge goal for me. From its inception in 2014 to its realization in 2019 I have grown so much as a person and with every decision I made towards improving myself and my application I reaffirmed my passion for medicine. It took five years of hard, gruelling work and determination, sleepless nights working on projects and courses, sacrifice, and planning to get where I am. It took four years of applications to get an acceptance. And I am finally in. I am finally in. QMED2023 PS: for those of you who are struggling or otherwise needing guidance on your applications I am willing to provide insight and advice
  17. 28 points
    I CANT BREATHE. I CANT BREATHE. ACCEPTED. 5th time applying, 2nd time interviewing , IP Guys never fucking give up. I have two undergrads, I'm doing my masters, I redid 4 of my cegep classes (yes i was 25 and hustling it in cegep). 3,8 science GPA. IM OFF RUNNING SOMEWHERE SCREAMING THAT IM HAPPY. PM me for anything.
  18. 28 points
    It’s going to be a long one. I wrote all of this before I got in, because there is something wonderfully raw and vulnerable about documenting my reflections while I’m still on the outside looking in. I knew that if I was unsuccessful this cycle, I would still read it to remind myself of how far I’ve come. -- My non-trad path is nothing unusual- I suppose I am just a late bloomer who paid her dues after the fact. The biggest challenge for me, throughout this whole journey, was lacking the protective factors to cushion the falls. I have been financially independent, which means choices were often made to have a financial safety net rather than for improving my med school applications. I had no one within my social network to guide me; my family has not been supportive of my decisions, so I felt like I could never turn to them (as of now they still don’t know that I interviewed and got accepted). This forum taught me everything I needed to know about getting into medical school, and that being a physician is still a possibility for someone like me. I began university when I was 18, completely lacking in self-awareness and nowhere near ready to make any sort of decisions about my future. I went to UofT for life sciences. There’s that joke: “How many UofT students does it take to change a light bulb? Four; one to change it and three to crack under the pressure”. Well, I was one of the three. My time at UofT was the closest I’d come to being depressed. My marks were atrocious; I felt worthless and incompetent all the time. My family didn’t understand- and didn’t know how to- help me; no one told me “you should stop and figure your shit out before completely ruining your transcript”. I tried going to counselling but felt like I was not being listened to, so I never went back. Something was very wrong, I didn’t know what or how to fix it. Things at home were bad. In my final year, I cut all financial ties with my parents, and moved out- I needed to become my own person. The independence was exhilarating. The financial stress was real, but my mental health also improved 100%, and I gained the energy and mental clarity to finally start thinking about what I wanted in life. Unfortunately, at this point my marks (cGPA of 3.1, no year above 3.5) were useless for any post-grad program. I applied to Michener’s medical radiation program, a second-entry bachelor program, to become an X-ray tech. I got accepted, but opted to not attend-- for the first time, I thought about what I wanted in my career, and decided it was not for me. I decided to take a year off and consider other second degree options. I started to look into becoming a dietitian (other RDs on this forum, like Real Beef, were very helpful). This would be a competitive process with a lot more uncertainty than going to Michener. I had a lot to prove and nothing to show for it. I used the year to work several minimum wage jobs in healthcare to save up money for a year of unpaid dietetic internship that would follow my second undergrad, while getting volunteer experience in nutrition to start building my resume for dietetic internship applications. I started my second degree in nutrition with a lot of self-doubt. After UofT, I was uncertain that I could even pull off low 80s. I was sure that everyone was smarter than me, and that I was the loser who flunked a whole degree but still couldn’t keep up. But I also had a level of mental clarity and focus that I’d never felt before. And low and behold, I ended up finishing my first year with the highest average in my program. A 3.94. It was then that I realized I was onto something-for the first time, it seemed like medicine could be a possibility. I decided to extend my second degree into 3 years, to be eligible for Ottawa (ironically, I never interviewed at Ottawa), while building my application for dietetic internships. This led me to different opportunities in leadership, teaching, and working with low SES populations. After 2 years into my second degree, I wrote the MCAT while working full-time and self-teaching myself the material despite taking (and flunking) my pre-reqs 4-5 years before that. I was pleasantly surprised with a balanced 514 (however, with a CARS of 128, it was never good enough for Western). The year after, I graduated from my second degree with the highest cumulative average in my program. It took me 3 cycles to get my first and only interview at Queen’s. During my second cycle, I was completing my dietetic internship, which provided many opportunities to gain clinical and counselling skills, work with marginalized populations, lead QI projects, and work within interdisciplinary teams- I learned more about my interest and suitability for medicine in this 1 year than I had in my whole life prior to this. Internship was hard work, but also gave me small boosts of confidence and signs I am not a complete dumbass (e.g. a nephrologist who had no idea that I was applying to med, after listening to my renal case presentation, told me how impressed he was that I’ve shown level of knowledge that he’d only expect from a senior medical resident; 2 of my preceptors said that in their 10-20 years teaching, they’ve never seen a student work so hard to improve herself and be so dedicated to her patients; rotation after rotation I was praised for my critical thinking skills and natural ease in developing rapport with patients). This wasn’t just about ticking off boxes to get into med, but about developing my passion for hands-on learning and learning about my strengths and weaknesses as a professional. For the first time in my life, I thought “maybe I am good enough to become a doctor.” When I submitted my application for the third cycle, I had just graduated from internship and started working in public health in Northern Ontario. I moved here because I wanted to continue to step outside of my comfort zone. I wanted to do more advocacy and upstream work, and this was the place to do it. At around the time of decision day, I had applied to RD jobs in Alberta to gain IP status for U of C. So here’s what I’ve learned in the last five years: · Know yourself. Know your identity outside of being a premed. Figure out what your values are, what kind of a person you want to be, what drives you to take action, what triggers your mind to go down dark rabbit holes. This takes time and effort, and self-reflection from life experiences, but it helps to build resilience against the hurdles along the application process, medical training, and set-backs life in general. Knowing who you are and what you have to offer the world protects you against having your self-esteem and identity shattered when things don’t go as you had hoped; it gives you the courage to say “let’s try again.” when the world seems to tells you “you are not good enough.” Similarly, I hear too often that when people have spent their whole life dedicated to getting into med school, that when they finally get in, they feel a bit lost- “now what?”. I suppose that happens when you see getting in as a final destination rather than one of the stops along a never-ending journey of building yourself up. People around me couldn’t fathom where I got the persistence to keep at it despite facing setbacks and watching the years go by. It’s because I knew there is nothing valuable that a rejection can take away from me. I have been building myself up as a person. I am still going to be me, no matter what happens inside that interview room, and what May 8th brings. I still possess all the traits that I worked hard to develop and love about myself- my grit, self-awareness, intellectual curiosity, empathy, open-mindedness- and these are all going to carry me far in life, medicine or not. No rejection letter can take that away from me. · Figure out what you want to accomplish in medicine, outside of medicine. I always ask myself: what's appealing about a career as a physician, and how can I try to achieve it through another route? What skills do I want to use on a day to day basis in my career? What core values and beliefs will motivate me to do what I do in my career? I think reflecting on this helps to flesh out your motivations for pursuing medicine, helps to identify alternative career paths, and should you pursue an alternative path while you reapply, helps you to gain insights and skills that will be useful for medicine. Hopefully the adcoms will recognize this. If not, well, at least your satisfaction with your alternative path will still be pretty high. · Be kind to yourself. The playing field is not even, and you don’t need to add an additional layer of self-inflicted cruelty to the mix. It’s ok to not feel 100% determined all the time. When the self-doubt starts to creep in, sit on it, talk to someone (in my opinion, everyone should have a therapist). Use the insights from the above 2 points to ground yourself and as motivation to keep going. · Develop yourself in areas outside of academics. What saved me was working minimum wage jobs since I was 16 (I actually started out cleaning bathrooms, after I was fired from scooping ice cream for being too socially inept. True story.). 75% of my activities on my ABS were employment. I had to work, because I did not come from a background as privileged as that of many premeds. If the circumstances were different, perhaps I would’ve gotten in earlier. But the real world was the best teacher I’ve ever had- it helped me develop financial independence and literacy, character, resilience, and interpersonal skills that helped me along every step of this journey. It helped to shape my convictions of the kind of physician, what kind of person, I want to be. Ease yourself into uncomfortable situations today to build resilience against shit-hitting-the-fan moments later in life. --- I also want to say that sometimes on these forums, we read non-trad stories and it seems like people were 100% determined from the get-go while they stayed on this one path for 4-10 years. I know I wasn’t…and that’s ok. As a non-trad, you have more life decisions to make along your journey, some big, some small. I know that I had to make many decisions over the years to favour either my nutrition career, chances for med school, or my personal life- many times, these three conflicted. There’s no right way to go about it- it depends on your risk tolerance, other responsibilities in life, and priorities. Know yourself…this is so, so important. I feel so privileged that everything in my life lined up so perfectly to allow me to pursue this path long enough to eventually get accepted. I’m always happy to chat about second degrees, being an RD, or anything related. Stay positive and kind to yourself, PM101.
  19. 28 points
    I got mixed responses when I asked if I should do this but I did it anyways. I ended up sounding like fucking shrek so I do not advise doing this. Hopefully the interviewers thought I had a speech impediment or something
  20. 27 points
    Anon1

    MD Class of 2024 bag colour

    Oh we're looking on the bright side alright...
  21. 25 points
    grepefruit12

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Got off the waitlist 2:06pm getting groceries right now almost dropped my egg whites!!
  22. 25 points
    ADMISSION !!!!! J'en reviens pas!!! J'ai littéralement fixé mon écran pendant 5 minutes sans aucune réaction. Je comprenais pas!!! Après 2 ans de cégep de HESS, 2 ans d'uni, enfin j'ai atteint mon objectif ! - réponse : admission - contingent : universitaire régulier, en cours de bac - stats (cote, MEM, #LA) : cote 35.7, MEM 550. 1ère fois aux MEM Pour les autres refusés ou sur la LA, SVP n'abandonnez pas !! Vous êtes capable, je le pense vraiment.
  23. 25 points
    Here's a visual of what @rmorelan said. Hopefully this helps you visualize your future path Hit us up if you have any more questions, we gotchu fam
  24. 24 points
    Birdy

    MD Class of 2024 bag colour

    Clusters of 2015 matriculants were called grapes because of our purple bags. You guys get to be busy bees! I think it’s nice. I’d have been happy with it. The colour is a dandelion yellow. Nice and rich. Dandelions thrive on any surface in any conditions no matter what you do to them. Maybe you guys can be like them.
  25. 24 points
    UwoToUo

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    I calmed down a bit before making this post but I got the email from Chantal at 2:06 as well!! Was not expecting this!!! See everyone online in the fall and best of luck to anyone still on the waiting list! If anyone has any questions feel free PM me Four cycles and I finally got in, unreal guys lol. Do not lose hope!
  26. 24 points
    DrOtter

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    HOLY SH*TTTTTTTTT guys. Chantal just sent me an offer e-mail. The first wave is HAPPENING RIGHT NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! GOOD LUCK EVERYONE!!!!! I CANNOT BELIEVE THIS I'M HYPERVENTILATING!!!!!!! I will be accepting. This is literally my dream. I'm keeping you all in my good thoughts guys!!
  27. 24 points
    KephreN

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    Réponse: admis. Courriel reçu à 16h08. Réponses des autres universités: je n'ai appliqué qu'à ULaval Catégorie: universitaire régulier (refusé dans la catégorie marcher du travail) Cote: CRU 34.4XX Impressions sur le Casper: Impressions assez médiocres à la fin. Beaucoup de réponses peu développées. Je ne croyais pas m'être démarqué de la moyenne. Plus les journées passaient, plus je remettais en question mes réponses avec des "j'aurais dû..." Commentaires : À 35 ans, j'ai un parcours asse atypique. Aucun désir ou motivation particulière au CÉGEP, j'ai commencé mon parcours universitaire en kinésiologie en 2005, par simple intérêt envers la physiologie de l'exercice. J'ai rapidement réalisé que l'avenir professionnel était limité dans ce domaine. Ironiquement, ce sont les professeurs en kinésiologie qui m'ont donné envie d'étudier en médecine, mais je n'avais pas les notes pour appliquer. J'ai fait les démarches pour étudier la médecine à l'étranger, ce qui m'a amené en Italie, mais je suis revenu après 1 an pour diverses raisons personnelles. L'Université Laval permettait, à l'époque (j'ignore si c'est encore possible), de refaire des cours pour rehausser sa CRU. J'ai remonté ma CRU et j'ai appliqué en physiothérapie. J'ai terminé le bac-maîtrise en 2015 avec 3 tentatives infructueuses d'admission en médecine. Finalement, j'étais OK avec l'idée de pratiquer en tant que physiothérapeute pour le restant de ma vie active. Ce n'est qu'en octobre dernier que j'ai décidé de retenter ma chance, après plusieurs désillusions par rapport à la physiothérapie. Lorsque j'ai reçu le courriel hier... je vous jure que j'étais le premier surpris. L'émotion ressentie après plus d'une décennie d'acharnement, de frustrations, d'acceptation, de lâcher-prise pour tenter une ultime fois de réaliser mon rêve. Enfin! Tout ça pour vous dire qu'il ne faut pas lâcher. Je suis une personne très différente d'il y a 10 ans. J'ai mûri, je suis devenu patient et j'ai adopté une approche beaucoup plus réflexive sur mes interactions et mon environnement. Profitez de chaque expérience, surtout celles que vous croyez être un échec.
  28. 24 points
    I've tried both and found that the iPad Pro has better hardware (Apple Pencil, longer battery, better display) and software (Notability, and although the surface has desktop Microsoft office with full features, I prefer the simpler mobile versions). With the iPad Pro, I was torn between using Notability vs OneNote. Notability has superior annotation, functional auto-sync to pdf, OneNote has better organization, infinite scroll in both x and y planes. So rather than choosing a compromise, I've ended up using both: Notability for in-class notes and OneNote for studying. Let me demonstrate what that looks like: Downloading the pdf/lecture file is easier on iPad (vs laptops) because you open it in the browser and tap "Open in Notability". This iniates multiple steps at once; it downloads the file, opens it in Notability, creates a pdf back-up in google drive that gets updated in real time as you take notes. All with one click. After class you get this: Then after class, you just tap the share button on the top left corner and with one tap save it in OneNote. Later when you're studying, you'll have room the ability to add additional subpages if necessary (Notability doesn't have this, see example below) and make additional comments/add resources on the side (see example below). You can also still annotate further: This system has worked beautifully for me so far. Let me know if you have any questions!
  29. 24 points
    humhum

    Unfilled carms spots

    People obsess over what electives they took, and how many specialties they can apply to, with who they are doing research etc. and how it all gets interpreted by the selection committee. All of these factors are absolutely dwarfed by the monstrous magnitude of one singular factor: that is, someone on the selection committee really liking you. You could have done 20 weeks of psych, and 2 weeks of plastics, and if you have one guy on the plastics selection committee that will go on the bat for you, not only are you guaranteed an interview, but you have a higher chance of matching to plastic than someone who has done 10 publications in the field. I have seen this scenario over and over- if you don't believe me, ask the residents in each competitive specialty what they did in their third and fourth year. How do they get to like you, and be your champion? It helps if have someone on the inside who is a family member, or buddy of your mom or dad, or someone that lives in your own hood, or has early male pattern baldness like yourself, or finds you sexually attractive, or likes that you are ugly so you don't threaten their self-esteem, or maybe plays the trumpet like you, likes the sound of your voice, likes that you talk a lot, or likes that you don't, etc. etc. etc., and a million other unmodifiable factors that are pure luck and circumstance. I'm telling you this because I have personally been on both sides of this. A selection member of a surgical specialty asked me to apply and told me point blank I would rank me top 3, and I had done nothing but be a friend of a friend. For fuck's sake, my suturing skills were poorer than the psychiatry gunner on rotation with me. (I didn't want to do that specialty so I didn't apply). Another PD point blank told me she would not write me a letter of reference, after I was basically running half her clinic independently and demonstrated I could manage her patients at an R2 level. Why? She could not even remember my name when I asked for the letter. Another selection member wrote me a glowing letter that got me an interview at the country's most competitive program for that specialty, but I didn't even get an interview at my own home university. Why? Because on the first day we talked about our love of indie music, and didn't stop talking about it for next 4 weeks. On one of the interviews, the interviewers sounded shocked I had actually done an elective with them just three months prior. They had no recollection of me whatsoever. That program was my number 1 rank. I didn't match to it, but my classmate who had it as one of his bottom choices, matched to it. At the end I matched to my second choice program, but had not even done an elective there. And you can guess why I got in. This is why you have to hedge your bets, and pay attention to the stats. If you apply to FM, Internal, and Psych, across the country, you are guaranteed a match. Based on the stats, it is nearly impossible not to match - short of showing up naked at the interviews. But if you are applying to Derm/Plastics/Emerg, etc, you better do a very realistic appraisal of yourself: do you have someone to be your champion on the inside? No amount of studying, elective time, volunteer call hours, and publications will make up for this. If you bust your ass, maybe you can make it to the interview. But from those 30 they are interviewing for the 1 spot, they will pick the one they like in their gut over the forgettable contender, no matter if the latter can clinically perform at a level of an R2. Which brings me to my last point, if you are an MSI1/MSI2/MSI3 reading this, find a back-up and learn to LOVE it. Better yet, stop calling it back-up. It is your parallel plan. How on earth do people do 4 years of med-school, and decided at the end of it, they rather risk going unmatched than do something like FM or IM? It is all a matter of finding a charismatic mentor in any field to convince you that at the end, the work becomes the same crap - the impact and meaning is what you bring into it, not the speciality. It is idiotic for a urology gunner to think 10 years from now, doing their billionth DRE in a row of their 70th patient of the day is somehow more glamorous than consulting a mother who just got the news that they son has autism. It is all medicine.
  30. 24 points
    HalfBaked

    2017 Backpack?

    I personally found it to be an interesting reminder. We can be proud and patriotic and still leave room to constructive autocriticism. Md Financial said the backpack was about the CMA's 150th anniversary, so I mean, in a way it is still linked to Canada's 150th celebrations. And CMA's history is also one of being involved with at-risk minorities. So I don't think it was that off subject, though I also understand why some might think it is. I'm actually more than surprised to see the reactions this has brought. No one is being told that because you want a red backpack and/or because you want to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary that you are being intransigeant to indigenous communities. It's merely a reminder and a way to bring awareness. If that doesn't interest you, fine just dont reply and post a comment on a different facette of the subject. As for the restaurant analogy, well it is held in a private setting, whereas this forum is a public space where anyone can contribute in any way they see fit as long as they are being respectful. To be fair, there is no right place to talk about those kind of subjects. They will always make some people uncomfortable, or bore them, or annoy them, or kill their fun. As for being involved with indigenous communities. That is a great and commendable act. I find that amazing. But it would be equally amazing to not discourage someone who tried to open a discussion about the social injustices they're living. I'm pretty sure they would be thankful for that too. And yes, it's just a backpack. Like it was just a seat in a bus, or just an apple that fell from a tree. From trivial objects can emerge amazing discoveries and history-changing events. I'm not saying this backpack is gonna start a revolution, but hey, if it can start a conversation on one, if not the most marginalized community in our country: it is a good thing. Telling someone that it isn't pertinent, that SJWs are invading again, that it should be discussed elsewhere, that it isn't about race/gender, that they are overreacting; well, it just stops all forms of debates. It's like taping someone's mouth and writing SJW on that tape. Anyone can be easily discredited and shushed like that, and change doesn't emerge without communication. Just because you don't want to be part of a conversation, that doesn't mean you have to prevent that conversation from happening. And even if you think the conversation should happen but elsewhere, there are respectful ways to say it. "Hey, you should create a thread about indingenous communities in Canada so you can have a more appropriate environment for that debate" is better suited than "take your unnecessary comments elsewhere", don't you think?
  31. 23 points
    MedicineLCS

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    I"M IN!!! Same time stamps as everyone else. Time to make someone else happy by dropping my backup (as soon as everything goes through)!
  32. 23 points
    I typed this really long post but was almost going to delete it. I felt like it sounded so silly. But I will keep it in the hopes that some of you find it helpful/encouraging because I've always enjoyed and was motivated by reading this thread. I tried injecting some context into this, so hopefully it doesn't bore you guys too much with being somewhat long. I grew up in a relatively rough neighbourhood. I'll give you an example to highlight the point: in grade 7 while my friends and I were going trick or treating, we ran into three of my older brother's friends profusely bleeding from stab wounds. Turns out they had been ambushed by a group they had bad blood with. Anyway, one of them had a pretty bad gash in his neck, close to his jugular, but thankfully none of the major vessels were cut. My friends and I had to help them to a nearby clinic (which was thankfully open). Scary stuff, but it was the reality of the place. My parents worked really hard to provide for my siblings and I (I have two older brothers - let's call them Alpha and Bravo). They tried their absolute best to keep us shielded from the bad stuff, but there's always an inevitable influence by the environment. Being males in a rough neighbourhood meant keeping up a “macho” facade. You definitely didn't get overly sentimental, and so my brothers and I were walled off emotionally not only from friends, but each other as well. So what was the culmination of these early childhood experiences? The "climax" of it all came during my senior year of high school. Well, I should say my SECOND senior year. At this point in my life, I had never had the experiences to develop an appreciation for education and knowledge. I would skip classes to go play sports. There was a point in grade 12 where I had skipped more classes than I had actually attended. This meant that I was forced to do an extra year in high school to try and salvage my marks enough to try and apply to postsecondary. This extra year was tough. You question the decisions you’ve made so far, you watch all your friends move on to the next stage of their lives, and you're in classes with kids younger than you. Unfortunately, this wasn't even the tip of the iceberg. Within the span of 3-4 months, my life literally spiraled out of control. My high school sweetheart (who had started university at this point) had just broken up with me. I already mentioned how I came from a background where I was extremely insular about keeping my feelings to myself. My girlfriend was a sweetheart - I could open up emotionally to her and it was a welcome change. Losing her in an already difficult time was tough, and unfortunately things kept getting worse. Soon after the breakup, I injured myself playing sports, effectively ending my entire sports year and requiring surgery. Sports had always been that one pseudo-emotional outlet of mine, so removing it was definitely a huge emotional hurdle. I even started losing my hair from stress (this is a contentious topic haha, but I genuinely believe acute stressors can potentially act as a trigger). Unfortunately, I would soon realize that all of these challenges would pale in comparison to what was to follow. I will never ever forget this day. It still seems so vivid. I came home from school one day to see my brother, Bravo, in our driveway with this very confused/sad look on his face. He was very inebriated, but that confused/sad look still haunts me. He looked so vulnerable. He was being arrested for drug charges. It was heartbreaking. We would later find out that he had been battling severe mental health issues and masked them through substance abuse. Being arrested wreaked even more havoc on his mental health. We couldn't bail him out because my other brother (Alpha) had already tried. The first time he was bailed out, Bravo's mental health lead to him acting very erratically. He broke his bail conditions and disappeared. We were able to track him down after a friend of Bravo’s contacted the family. So I had to watch from afar, yet again, as my brother got arrested. My mom was with me this time. We later learned from the friend that Bravo had been really hungry, yet we saw him get arrested as he about to take the first bite of his food. My mom started getting very frequent panic attacks soon after this incident. I remember visiting him in jail on multiple occasions, only to be received by non-nonsensical and hysterical laughter. This was absolutely brutal for me. I grew up always being Bravo’s sidekick. I followed him everywhere he went, being that annoying little brother. He really was my role model. So to see him there, unrecognizable, was very gut wrenching. We were unable to convince the penal system of the clear mental issues he was exhibiting and he was retained in a normal jail. His condition worsened and he was eventually placed in solitary confinement due to bad behavior. He stayed there for 2-3 weeks. Being a witness to this and unable to help was absolutely excruciating. Like, the breakup, surgery, extra year of high school seem bad right? They genuinely felt like a walk in the park compared to this. It was during this ordeal that I had made up my mind to commit myself to working hard, getting into university, and getting into the field of psychology so that I might help others that had gone through similar situations as my brother. Thankfully, after a few months convincing, we were finally able to get through to the courts. We had been able to convince the judge to transfer Bravo to a mental treatment facility as opposed to a jail. I still remember the day we found out that they would transfer him: June 12th, 2009. It is probably on the top of the happiest days of my life. Getting into medicine definitely pales in comparison to that day. Anyway, he received a diagnosis and began treatment, which he has continued to this day. I started university soon after. Motivated with my desire to pursue psychology, I had a relatively strong start. However, I was faced with quite a few additional hurdles on the way that reflected in my GPA trends. Beyond the typical academic struggles (taking time to find field of interest) and personal struggles (breakups, dealing with limitations after surgery etc.), helping Bravo navigate his mental health condition and potential substance relapses was quite challenging. Additionally, my other brother (Alpha) also developed a very bad substance abuse problem due to the stress of the events surrounding Bravo. It's been an ongoing thing for a few years and still continues to this day. This caused my mom's panic attacks to become even worse/frequent. However, Alpha has significantly improved in recent months. But to tie in an earlier theme, I strongly believe that there is a component of emotional support to this. My siblings and I were raised to be very insular about our feelings, and substances may be seen as an easy “alternative” to having to deal with these emotions. That’s why I think it's so important to cultivate the ability to share your emotions with others, and make others feel comfortable in sharing their emotions with you. Especially so as a physician. So that's my journey to med in a nutshell. It took me 5 years to do a 4-year high school degree, 6 years total to do a 4-year BSc, three MCAT writes, and three additional years off. But I've always been one to challenge myself and improve after every failure. I've been fortunate enough to have amazing parents (though we might not agree on everything) and lucky enough to find amazing professors/mentors in my life. I owe literally all of my successes to these people. Although I continue to be faced with some of the same challenges that seemed completely insurmountable before, I really believe I am stronger than ever, not only individually, but also because of the social support network I’ve been able to establish. I understand the responsibilities I carry because of these events, but believe me, that doesn’t stop me from being the silliest and happiest person that I can possibly be. I hope to carry these experiences into the field, and hopefully make a positive impact. Here is a thread to some of my more CV-like details: http://forums.premed101.com/topic/69931-lost-with-updates/ if you’re curious about what type of stats, ECs etc. I was working with. Good luck everyone!
  33. 22 points
    This was too fitting not to post
  34. 22 points
    Here's a bright idea. We're headed into a pandemic and we need more doctors, might as well just accept all of us. Who agrees?
  35. 22 points
    TIME STAMP: 12:30 MDT Interview Date (MD or MD/PhD): MD March 28th Result: Invite! cGPA/wGPA: 3.60/not eligible (submitted AEE) YES, that’s right. 3.60 cGPA!!! wGPA would be 3.90 if they accepted my AEE. MCAT: 510 (3 attempts, 1st attempt being 494) ECs: Very strong on the volunteering side (founder, president of clubs, general manager of non profit organization, volunteer trainer at hospital, worked with schizophrenic and Alzheimer’s patients directly). Very weak on the research side. No pubs. Just volunteered at a lab for a few months. Essays: wrote them the night before! But must have been strong cause my GPA is terrible! Year: Finished UG in 2016. No Masters. Geography: OOP This is unbelievable news for me. I remember when I applied I had no hope for UofT given my GPA being the lowest possible to even apply to the program! I also didn’t do a masters and have very little research experience. I was waiting for a rejection this week. Actually I had been waiting for it ever since. I am posting here to show you all that you don’t need a 3.99 GPA, you don’t need a 520 MCAT, you don’t need a masters or publications. All those things are great, but if you don’t have them, the game is not over. Also, it doesn’t matter where you start. I started with a 2.9 GPA in first year and a 494 MCAT. Any sane human would have told me to forget medicine, but I worked hard and turned it all around. I have 2 interviews this year and I hope to make them count! Good luck to you all. Don’t give up.
  36. 22 points
    Upvote if you're IP and haven't heard anything yet
  37. 21 points
    Al22

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    Réponse: admission 16h01 Réponses des autres universités: refus McGill pré-interview, pas appliqué aux autres Catégorie: universitaire contingent PhD (Pour votre info, ils me disent dans le courriel que la CRU moyenne des gens convoqués pour ce contingent est 31.028) Cote: 31.638 (8/10 = A- au bacc en biomed à uOttawa complété + maitrise complétée) Impressions sur le Casper: Je l'ai fait à l'automne pour McGill donc je me souviens plus Commentaires : Une douzaine de refus et 9 ans d'université plus tard, on me donne enfin ma chance !! Merci x1000 à ce forum de m'avoir donné de l'espoir durant les 5 dernières années
  38. 21 points
    Symphonie

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Comme ça a déjà été dit, l'attente pour une réponse est très nerve racking. Honnêtement, tant mieux si pour toi ce n'est pas stressant, mais tout le monde n'est pas obligé de réagir comme toi. Tout le monde vit le stress à sa façon. Je ne sais pas si, en disant « tout cuit dans le bec », « enfants-rois », tu sous-entends que ce sont tous des enfants de riches qui l'ont eu facile.... Comme ça a été très bien dit plus haut, tu ne connais pas ces gens, alors faire de tels préjugés est vraiment pas commode. Il y a des gens de toutes les sphères de la société dans les classes de pharmacie et de science de la santé. C'est vraiment un préjugé gratuit. Et même si une personne ici a des parents aisés et a été gâté dans sa jeunesse, ça change quoi ? Il a le droit d'être nerveux pareil. Je suis sur ce forum depuis que je suis au cégep, donc 2016, et je lisais souvent les anciens threads, même jusqu'à 2010. Ça a toujours été comme ça vers les dates de réponse. Si tu ne veux pas voir ça, tu peux fermer le site et uniquement revenir le jour des réponses, en cliquant sur la dernière page du thread. Ça te permettra de skipper le contenu qui ne t'intéresse pas.
  39. 21 points
    Some news guys! On the phone, I asked if the invites have been sent out yet for Mar 28/29. She said basically none have been sent out yet, and that they will most likely be sent out next week.
  40. 21 points
    Felt I should add my stats in here because I’m super stoked and would want someone like me who was applying to see this... 2013 was my first application to medical schools in Canada, 2019 was my 1st interview at UBC. Accepted, VFMP (1st Choice) TIME STAMP: 11:56am PSTEarly or Regular Deadline: RegularAGPA (if applicable): ~83MCAT: 124 in CARS, 513 overall. Geography: IP Educational background: BSc and MSc , plus some Continuing Ed. ECs: Not an Olympian. Didn’t have any publications from my Master’s degree until after the June deadline, but some poster presentations. My weak GPA didn’t get me on the Dean’s Honours List. BUT I had years and years of service/volunteering/philanthropy and policy work during high school and university years, working in marginalised communities in BC, experiences from my life that let me be in leadership roles outside of school, and having made connections with people that supported me over many, many years and were so thrilled to be verifiers (and making me cry seeing their genuine excitement when I told them I got in). Honestly, it took a village to raise me and they were all included in my application. Interview: I worked a full-time and part-time job while prepping for interviews, but all I can say is that I spent NUMEROUS hours working with friends, colleagues, anyone who I could find that wanted to spend the time to give me honest feedback to prepare. I wanted the input of non-applicants (I wasn’t here for the biased opinions and shadiness, and that’s the T), and I went in feeling great. I read articles for 5 hours a day to understand what was going on. I listened to podcasts while I worked. I watched the evening news before going to bed. Unfortunately, getting to the interview day and walking up to the first station, it was an out of body experience that I didn’t anticipate and my anxiety got the best of me. I know I had brought enough into the conversations, but it wasn’t at my best — however, I was happy to know that it was enough. Having low grades and a threshold CARS score was really pushing me to prove my worth in the interview and I did (and I’m so proud of that). The acceptance email comes and the grades no longer matter, the number of times I tried and wrote the MCAT no longer matter, the years of failed and rejected applications no longer matter. I’m looking forward. Forward to a new chapter and new beginning. Getting into medical school is easy for some with the grades and the privileges, however, without those, it’s full of hurdles. Jumping over enough of them will eventually get you to the finish line. One yes is all you need.
  41. 21 points
    Ok sorry for this long post but I had to share my thoughts to all current and future applicants that are facing disappointment. Everything written here is based on my humble opinion. If it can help one person, than I have achieved my goal. Introduction Since decision came out, a lot of amazing candidates learned that they were rejected. They may feel emptiness, doubts or sadness, thinking that their efforts were wasted. They may feel that even after re-doing basic sciences, reading books and working hard, it wasn't enough. I am just writing this post to let you know that we all go through that feeling. You are human and it is normal to feel that way. What I did in the process, is write letters to myself. I never wanted to forget how I felt because it would help me later on in life. I was questioning if writing a post about this was a good idea. I am no one. And I like motivation but would hate to sound like a cheap version of Anthony Robbins. About me I got in this year at my fourth trial. I was granted a single interview and rejected everywhere else. It was my first interview. I am not different form all of you and I got in. I am a normal student. I am not smart. I just try my best and try to forget about the rest. You're more than a medical school acceptance or rejection Challenges come along all the time, may they be medical or not. Resilience, persistence and dedication are traits that can be developed. In my case, I was trying to become a better person. I improved myself and that could have been useful in every circumstance. Had I decided to go into healthcare management, financial services, etc. Sure, rejections letter meant I wasn't fit for medical school. But no one could take away the skills I had developed and the experiences I gained. The best way to prevent regrets is to give your best today For me, there are 2 types of rejections : Rejected while knowing I did not do my best : leads to regrets Rejected while knowing that I did my best: no regrets at all This year, I was ready for the second type of rejection. So all I can tell you guys is : just do your best. If you truly give everything you have, then you can be proud and happy. Control what you can control. The increasing competition and the decreased amount of seats : you can't control at all. Your GPA, your MCAT score, your pre-req scores : all in your hands. You can still change your mind and that is not a failure I think that medicine is not for everyone. Some amazing potential doctors become public health researchers, lawyers, entrepreneurs, etc. And they leave a trace on our society that exceeds what most doctors did. Don't give up because they refused to give you a spot. BUT accept that there there are other ways to make an impact. If you decide to move on because you discover another passion : it is fine and you should be proud. It is not a failure. It is a decision. We can have more than one passion in life. It's not a one size fits all world. Just be sure you are making that decision because you want to : not because a letter forced you to. Everything you are feeling is normal and we all felt i So I said earlier that I used to write letters to myself when I was tired. It is very personal but here is one that I wrote about a month ago. I wrote it after the interviews when I was reading about the statistics. Let's just say the numbers are not very encouraging. Just to show you that you are not alone in this. I'm not even making that up. Just try to be the best version of yourself Remember that everyone that got in, every current resident and practicing physician, everyone encountered obstacles. That is also true for plumbers, janitors, lawyers, cashiers and engineers. It is part of life. Don't try to become a better doctor thinking it will make you a better person. Do your best, be the best version of yourself regardless of medical school. THAT will make you a better doctor. Good luck to all !
  42. 20 points
    Dr. Shqipe

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Hey everyone! I just wanted to let you all know (and future years looking at trends) that I got in yesterday! Thank you all again for the incredible support and being there for each other and myself every step of the way from interview invites to the waiting and the OMSAS button controversies. Each step both good and bad was a pleasure to experience with you all! I wish you all incredible luck and please know my inbox is always open if you wanna have a chat! Once again thank you all <3
  43. 20 points
    bruh

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Hey everyone. I just wanted to say that I have been in your position and I vividly remember the excruciating pain I went through the summer of 2018 being on Ottawa’s good waitlist. With it being the only waitlist I was on (I got rejected from UofC post interview) I felt the pressure. After all this hard work you have put in, you really need it to work out this time. Thinking of all the work you have to put in all over again this year if you’re not accepted is a daunting thought. I actually never made it off of Ottawa’s good waitlist (wGPA: 3.92). It seemed that they went through the waitlist until 3.93 that year and nearly reached my timestamp (off by 00:00:12) but it wasn’t enough. That shit hurt man. To add to the pain, I never got an interview again from Ottawa in the following years. In fact in 2019 I didn’t get any interviews from any med school. I thought that I had lost my only chance of getting in. Nonetheless, in 2020 I got invited and accepted to UofT. So, I’m here to tell you to be hopeful but also realistic and strong. Yes, there is a chance you will make it off the waitlist but beware of putting too much faith in the good waitlist. Plan this summer and fall properly and prepare yourself in the event that you never get off the waitlist. Bad waitlist is a polite rejection. Not a single person has gotten off the bad waitlist in recent years, so it would have to be a miracle for it to happen. The timestamp theory does have some merit to it. I was very involved in tracking it and once the waitlist offers came out in 2018 we saw that it corresponded to timestamps based on the GPA, except some outliers. One thing I will mention is that some people calculate their wGPA wrong and it could be the reason for those outliers. Either way, stay strong, hopeful and realistic regardless of what happens. You’re going to be a doctor one day, don’t lose hope.
  44. 20 points
    bruh

    May 12 Countdown Thread 2020

    Regardless of what happens, be proud of yourselves. You have all worked so hard to get here; you cannot be blamed for being anxious and even neurotic at times. It’s normal to feel stressed during these times. Don’t let others put you down, or question your character because of how you are feeling. But remember that even if things don’t work out this cycle, you will find a way in life. Tell yourself that. I am ready for a rejection. I have been rejected the past 2 years and I’m still here, staying hopeful. I will be upset if I am rejected again, but I will not give up. I will find a way, and so will you. I wish the best of luck to all of us on May 12th.
  45. 20 points
  46. 20 points
    TIME STAMP: 10:55 Result: Admitted with condition Pre-req GPA: 4.0 MCAT: Not submitted Feeling About MMI (please be mindful of NDA): First interview after facing many reject over the years. I felt good about 7-8 stations but was convinced I screwed up royally on 2-3 of them. But with time, I started doubting everything I did until today Year: 2nd undergrad finished in 2018 IP/OOP/International: IP Comments: To anyone reading this, it was my 6th time applying. After my first bachelor (with a disastrous GPA), I was even told by an advisor I could never get into med school. But I kept reading success stories on the forum about people who did a second bachelor and who got in. Thus I went down that road, which was not easy by any means, but it was all worth it. Do not get discouraged by getting a reject, keep improving yourself, do stuff that matters to you and which will show the adcoms how everyday you strive to become a better version of yourself and how big is your resolve to get into med school. Do not let a reject define who you are at the moment. You'll get in, I believe in that. It's just a matter of time. Congratulations to everyone who got in and for those on the waitlist, it's not easy to be patient but it will pay off.
  47. 20 points
    LostLamb

    The process is taking it's toll...

    I have never gotten around to writing my “story” but if you read my very old posts you will probably piece it together. I am in my last six months of residency (as a subspecialist) of my life and am thrilled that I stuck things out for 5 (non consecutive) application cycles. I am going to do with my life what I literally have always wanted to do—provide medical and psychiatric care for people with developmental disabilities and mental health across the lifespan—I just didn’t know it was a thing when I was very young. I just knew by having and living with a sibling with significant special needs that it was something missing for that vulnerable part of society...and their families. Truly, to tolerate the uncertainty of a future career in medicine you need to continue with your life, alternate plans, and put the noise of naysayers out of your mind. many people, family included, spoke directly or behind my back about “why doesn’t she give up?”. Since working toward this goal was not costing them or affecting them in any way, I couldn’t figure out what business they had to speak this way....and ignoring that chatter was very healthy for me but also gave me pause to regularly reflect on whether or not this was what I truly wanted. I am fortunate that both my parents understood and fully supported my goal. You need someone in your wheelhouse—and maybe it’s just us on the forum, but that’s something and may be all you need. Many meander through life unsure of what they want, what the point is, and very unhappy. Having dreams and goals help immensely, but they must also be tempered with a dose of reality. Sometimes you just can’t afford another MCAT or degree, Or your family or medical situation dictates that you need to work or take time off, and this you’ll press pause on this goal. The key is that you do not define yourself and your success by a singular outcome, and that you continue to seek growth and build mastery and obtain fulfillment whatever the situation you’re in. And at some point you’ll get into medicine, or you won’t and you’ll find another way of living meaningfully and contently. All the best to all of you, I get how you feel and I have much confidence you’ll all “make it” somehow—whatever that ends up meaning! LL (the shrink who almost became a high school teacher)
  48. 20 points
    sorry for the late post, been busy pinching myself and crying all day!! TIME STAMP: ~14h30 pm (heart attack since 9 am)  Result: Admitted with condition !!! pre-reqGPA: 4,00 (redid my 4 basic pre-reqs at Athabasca, Thomson Rivers), old pre-req GPA was 3,01 MCAT: Not submitted Feeling About MMI (please be mindful of NDA): This was my 4th time interviewing at McGill, so I felt confortable with the process (I could've basically rehearsed their ppt slide), so I was a lot more relaxed and went in there being 1000% authentic (cheesy I know but its true). Felt like I was great in 3 stations, 1 below average and the rest pretty average IP/OOP/International: IP Comment : I've been applying to med school for 7 years!!! This was my 4th interview at McGill, I was straight up refused all 3 cycles before being admitted this year with no WL. Anyone with refusals, I know it sucks, I know your hurt. You need to keep trying and you need to push through if this is what you want. If anyone wants to chat PM me!!!
  49. 20 points
    6th time applying, 3rd time interviewing, still in shock to be posting this... Time Stamp: 12:25 PST Accepted, VFMP (first choice) AGPA: 86.55% MCAT: 512 (balanced, 129 CARS) ECs: Student government, orientations leader, crisis line volunteer, volunteering with various charities, hospital, lab assistant at various research labs (paid), CIHR funding for a summer, working at a gas station, currently working as a policy analyst for government, and a few very random but unique hobbies (honestly could have either really helped or not counted for anything, they're pretty out there) Geography: IP Year: BSc completed 2013, Master's completed 2016, currently working full-time Interview: Honestly felt like the best interview I've ever had, and I've done 12 (!) of them in the past 5 years. I walked out of every station this year feeling pretty good, and knew I absolutely nailed at least two of them (the acting station went almost perfectly, and there was one where I really felt I connected with the interviewer). There were some that were probably average, but I didn't feel like I bombed any of them - which was a first. Usually I walk out of them unsure and crossing my fingers that things worked out (it never did), this time was completely different. Stats from last year: NAQ: 29.00 AQ: 25.58 TFR: 54.58 Interview: Below Average (below average the year before as well) I feel so blessed to have finally received an acceptance to a Canadian medical school. I've been applying for years now, and have been given so many opportunities - which I always ended up blowing. I've interviewed at UBC the past 3 years, but I've interviewed at Calgary, McMaster, Alberta, and Saskatchewan (I had a really high old MCAT score) over the years. May has consistently been the worst month of the year for me, and last year was especially awful because I spent a lot of time practicing - every week for a couple hours since the previous summer - and still received a rejection. That was a pretty low point in my life tbh. The practice did help, but I think the thing really holding me back was my lack of maturity. I had always been very academically focused, and to be honest hadn't really had a chance to live a life. I think doing that the past few years - falling in love, going to bars with friends, arguing about politics, moving to my own place and dealing with laundry and dinner - has really helped me grow as a person, and I think permanently changed who I am. I went into each of those stations as if I was talking to my girlfriend about an interesting topic over lunch. I had fully formed opinions and thoughts on subjects because I'd argued about these things over beer with friends (and on reddit). I'd had cool experiences to talk about not just from volunteer activities, but also from disagreements with a roommate or co-workers, or from moving across the country for a master's program. Anyway, wanted to get that off my chest. This year really did feel different, and I'm glad it ended up being different. I interviewed at Calgary as well this year but felt terrible after (question style is very different from UBC imo, which I focused my preparation for), and got a rejection. I also interviewed at a US school and received an acceptance, but the tuition kind of terrifies me so I was still really stressed out this week. To those who didn't get an offer this year, trust me when I say I know how it feels. I've had a lot of experience trying to improve my application over the years, so if anyone wants some advice, or even just to chat or rant, please reach out through PM. This process really involves a lot of luck, and there are so many amazing people who don't get accepted every year. If you really want this, it'll happen eventually.
  50. 19 points
    vandijk.04

    2020 Waitlist Thread

    Got off the waitlist today at 11:47 !!!! Hoping for all the best for all you guys <3 <3 !!!!!
×
×
  • Create New...