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  1. 33 points
    Just got accepted to VFMP!!!!! I am in tears... I am in so much tears.... I just can't... I just can't even process this..... oh ... my.. god... I am still shocked this is unbelievable...
  2. 32 points
    So update for any interested parties. I matched to Family Medicine! Always liked living life on the edge, but I'll admit this was cutting it close. I can still accomplish my goals through this route, just have to take a different path than initially intended. Thanks for all of the advice.
  3. 30 points
    After 6 years of applying to UBC Medicine... going through all the possibilities (regrets before interview, to regrets after interview, to regrets after waitlist, to being ineligible for 2 whole years), I seriously cannot believe I'm writing this... It had always seemed like it's something too good to be true, yet here I am. There are many people I would like to thank (and letting them know will take a solid week) from the bottom of my heart for the support, encouragement, and love they have provided me within this long and incredible journey I have been through. I write this with shock, excitement, and full of heart. TIME STAMP: 11:56 AM PST (May 10, 2019) Result: ACCEPTED VFMP (1st choice) !! Early or Regular Deadline: Regular Deadline GPA or AGPA (if applicable): ~84% MCAT (CPBS / CARS / BBFL / PSBB): 514 – (130 / 125 / 130 / 129) Current Degree (UG/Bachelors/Masters/PhD): BSc in 2014 Geography (IP/OOP): IP Extracurricular Activities (awards, achievements, volunteering, employment, research, etc.): I had written this description already in a separate post I made, but will be copying it here as well: Founded and lead a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for variety of causes via annual musical concerts, with the last 2 events focused on contributing to schizophrenia (5 years and counting); founded and led another charity aiding developing nations via Save the Children fund (6 years); extensive leadership and volunteering with UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy (8.5 years and counting); long-term ER volunteer and volunteer trainer and program coordinator (8.5 years and counting); long-term St. John Ambulance volunteer and Divisional Administration Officer (2000+ hours over 5 years, and counting); independently provide guidance and support to immigrants and families as they adjust to life in Vancouver/Canada (9+ years and counting); lots and lots of capacity to work with others including skin cancer research/holding workshops for high school students across Metro Vancouver, volunteering with med students and residents via UBC Department of Emergency Medicine, working closely with refugees and youth with physical and/or intellectual disabilities, and more (combined 3300+ hours); and lots and lots of diversity including clinical research as a volunteer, shadowing pediatric surgeons, toxicology research as a volunteer, epigenomics research at Michael Smith Labs, loads of piano and competitions, oil painting, and more. I also work 3 jobs right now, 1 full-time and 2 part-time jobs; full-time is being a research assistant at UBCH working on a project focused on treatment-refractory schizophrenia (over 2 years); part-time jobs include tutoring students in grade 4-12 in math and academic reading with a company, and also tutoring for the MCAT with a company. 1 Publication (1st author) on the application (had a poster publication/presentation on June 7th which couldn't be included unfortunately, and a few are expected to come soon). Lots of awards (mainly from high school) and one high performance activity for winning multiple awards with St. John Ambulance. The intention of this post is to try and help people down the line, so that's why I'm including lots of details. Interview: I finished my interview initially feeling good about my answers. I had a terrific interview experience! I felt each interviewer was well engaged in my responses and discussions; they all smiled and nodded as I was answering questions and follow-ups. But then the 3-month period started and man oh man oh man was I second-guessing myself... I kept doubting my answers and my confidence started to drop a little bit each week that had passed. I knew at minimum I did 5/10 stations that I would categorize as "good" and at absolute most 8/10 stations. But overall, especially leading to D-Day, I was completely unsure how I did, but I don't know if I was being too self-critical or not. At the end of the day, I still overthought everything haha. Turned out to be okay I guess! I would like to sincerely congratulate everyone who received an offer this year and sincerely congratulate in advance those who will be receiving offers from the waitlist! It's an overwhelmingly amazing feeling that I get a chance to be in class with you folks – I cannot wait to meet each and every one of you as we finally set to make our dreams become a reality . For those who didn't receive the news they were hoping for, I can definitely understand how you feel, believe me... Disappointing news can be demoralizing, but let me tell you that you were selected to interview for a reason; you all have incredible potential so please keep your chin held up high and do not allow, even for a single moment, a decision to define who you are. As my case can further add to the supporting evidence, persistence is absolutely key.
  4. 27 points
    Well... this story is five years in the making so bear with me for length... It is quite the novel!! I wrote in the forum 2 years ago with hopes of gaining acceptance to UBC... hoping to write in this thread. Turns out it wasn't going to be that year, but finally... FINALLY .... this year. This is the year I get the honour of writing my success story!! For anyone struggling right now, it took me FOUR years of applications to get an acceptance! If you are continually improving yourself and your application/interview skills/grades/etc. stay focused on your goal and hang in there! I am 33 this year and began this journey five years ago while deciding to change careers from environmental/animal biology towards medicine. My first step was to go back to school for some prereqs for UBC during the summer. I had asked for time off from work and was so lucky to receive it. I completed the courses with good grades and began studying for the old MCAT. Then I saw that the MCAT was changing and got crazy stressed out so I signed up for a Princeton Review course to learn what exactly was going to be tested on this new MCAT. I found it difficult to focus my attention 100% on the MCAT as I was concurrently working fulltime. A tragedy struck my family and I had to take a month off from studying, and shortly thereafter decided to quit my safe, full-time job to float by on a part-time job and savings while dedicating myself 100% to my goal and dream: getting a good score on the MCAT and getting into medschool. I pushed my test date ahead once or maybe twice, can't remember, and when finally the day came for my test I arrived sleep-deprived because my cat had been sick all night and it was so hot out that I couldn't sleep... No matter! I scored decently well regardless (511) and forged onward with my first ever set of medical school applications! I applied broadly and received pre-interview rejections from all schools. I hadn't expected much because I knew it takes an average of 3 applications in Canada to get in. That fall (2015) I had gone back to school to take medically-relevant courses as I had not really done so during undergrad (just had done typical bio degree courses) so I had a lot to focus on regardless. I finished those up with awesome grades in April 2016 and began the process of reapplying. I rewrote all of my descriptions for UBC and added new activities and grades. I took some first aid courses and started working as a medic on construction/oil/gas sites. During the 2016-17 cycle I received one interview: UBC. I prepared extensively with the interview groups, taking time from work to focus on preparing. Interview day came and went and I felt confident but not overly hopeful so as to spare myself in case of rejection. Mid-May rolled around and the offers, rejections, and waitlist emails came out and I was gutted to find I had been rejected... No matter! Forging onward. It has only been 2 applications so far anyways... After a brief pity session I regained my composure and determination and set myself up for taking even more university courses and enrolling myself in an additional course that would eventually grant me employment as a paramedic. I felt the fire of my passion fueling me onward: “I will get in” was the feeling. I went back to school again at more than one institution and did a heavy load, full-time and got A+ in most of my classes... “This will be my year”... I got another interview with UBC for Feb 2018. Second interview, third application; this has to be my year! Mid-May 2018: post-interview rejection. “Ok.. I can recover.. I guess. One more try... I have all those courses I did... does that open any doors for me?? Oh, Queen's! McMaster?? Do I take the MCAT again? Ok, let's do that – I really don't want to”... I was scared I would get a worse score somehow... And to have to redo that test and work and ... “Let's just try re-applying again this year without redoing the MCAT... one last shot with this score and then I will re-evaluate”. I begin crafting my OMSAS applications, and re-doing my UBC application. All is well I think. I will probably get my UBC interview at least! (fingers were crossed) and maybe I would score an Ontario interview... December 2018 UBC interview results day comes: PRE-INTERVIEW REJECTION... My TFR dropped over 10-15 points, just like my jaw... my NAQ dropped from mid 30's to in the low 20's... What??? I was shocked... How??? I had added hours, courses, activities, my wording was excellent, I had been receiving interviews for two years in a row????? HOW!!!??? If you look back through the UBC threads around that time you will see that I wasn't doing well with the news and I wasn't expecting much from Queen's either as I had never received an interview with them thus far (I applied during my first application round in 2015-16 also). After feeling low for a few weeks or so I began to slowly gather my broken dream and tried to see a way to improve, again. Fifth time will be the charm I guess, mostly ignoring that I still had apps out in Ontario... I go on vacation to the Caribbean and forget for a while that OMSAS will be releasing interview invites. I don't have much hope but I check my email the morning of the second day of my vacation there to see I had received an interview!!! I cry with happiness!! This cycle may yet provide positive news!! I finish my vacation and return home. I take a month off work and set to focusing on my interview. I watched Ted talks, read, practiced solo and otherwise relaxed. Planned my trip to Ontario and set off in March 2019... The interview felt amazing. I loved the school, the people, the curriculum design... The panel was awesome, and I felt so confident when I got back to my hotel room. I spent the rest of the night in a positive buzz and then came home reservedly hopeful... The wait between interviews and decision day was agonizing... I had started to think about my 'what-ifs' for the year... If I get in – do I buy/rent? Do I get a new car? What about this? What about that? If I don't get in... redo MCAT? Go up north for work? Move to Alberta? Move to Ontario? Start Australia applications? Go to the States? What about Ireland... and on and on and on... to the point where I had considered quitting this goal and beginning to brain-storm alternate careers... I reluctantly decided I would give it one last try before giving up if I didn't get in for this cycle. This process had taken so many years from me and I felt stuck in limbo and stagnant. Mid-May rolls around... Waitlisted... Ok I guess that's better than being outright rejected, but man... MORE WAITING!!! I commit to my daily activities to stay busy. I have some hope but I try not to let it get too high – the waitlist for Queen's notoriously moves a lot, according to historical trends (as noted in the Queen's threads)... Many on the Queen's forum think that the first wave of waitlist offers are coming out May 28, 2 weeks after initial offers... I check my email like a crazy person early in the morning on May 28... and also the forums to see if there was any news yet... I go to bed (in the morning cuz I am a night person) only to be woken an hour later by a gardener with power tools... Okay, well if I am going to be awake for a bit again may as well see how the forum is doing... The waitlist thread is hot... “oh.. jeez, it's happening... let's see – yep people are getting offers. Better rip off the bandaid and check my email...” Queen's School of Medicine----- Oh my god. I don't even have to open this email to know what it is... Dear Clever_Smart_Boy_Like_Me, On behalf of the Admissions Committee of Queen's School of Medicine, we are pleased to provide to you a conditional offer of acceptance... I didn't even read any further than this, I just started sobbing...loudly... with the windows open... someone probably thought something terrible had happened... I start running around in my house sobbing and shaking!! All the years of hard work and determination and sacrifice I had made. All the hours I had spent working at this... Everything I had done in the past five years finally FINALLY paid off... I GOT INTO MEDICAL SCHOOL!! I feel almost moved to tears just writing this sentence. I called my dad and I couldn't even speak, I was just sobbing hysterically into the phone... between sobs I said “I got in” and started losing it again... he came over to my house right away with flowers and a card. I ran around all day telling those important to me that I finally got in. My family and I went to dinner that night to celebrate and I am planning a party to celebrate as well.. Logistics of this process have set in and I am working on all the info I have to provide for the school and getting finances in order and looking for a place to live but... the magnitude of this washes over me randomly throughout the day and I feel so elated and proud and like crying again all over. I AM GOING TO BE A DOCTOR!! I am the first in my immediate family to attend university. And within my family there are not many doctors (though I have learned I have at least 2?). This was a huge goal for me. From its inception in 2014 to its realization in 2019 I have grown so much as a person and with every decision I made towards improving myself and my application I reaffirmed my passion for medicine. It took five years of hard, gruelling work and determination, sleepless nights working on projects and courses, sacrifice, and planning to get where I am. It took four years of applications to get an acceptance. And I am finally in. I am finally in. QMED2023 PS: for those of you who are struggling or otherwise needing guidance on your applications I am willing to provide insight and advice
  5. 26 points
    I CANT BREATHE. I CANT BREATHE. ACCEPTED. 5th time applying, 2nd time interviewing , IP Guys never fucking give up. I have two undergrads, I'm doing my masters, I redid 4 of my cegep classes (yes i was 25 and hustling it in cegep). 3,8 science GPA. IM OFF RUNNING SOMEWHERE SCREAMING THAT IM HAPPY. PM me for anything.
  6. 26 points
    Dear all current applicants and prospective applicants to UBC Medicine, My name is Neurophiliac as I’m obsessed with brains (in a good way, trust me ). I wanted to take this time to explain my story especially for those who haven’t received good news from UBC this year. In doing so, I am hoping that my story can become your inspiration to hold your head high, your motivation to push through with 100% of your energy, and your encouragement to consider not giving up. I want to put an emphasis on the consider part. As I’ve mentioned before, I absolutely have no right to tell you “hey, don’t give up”. After all, everyone has their own challenges that are unique to them, in which no one can fully comprehend or empathize with. But, I wish to ask of you for one thing: to please try. Please try to consider not giving up. Even when life seems impossible, if there is a will, there is a way. Later, I will get into some details of how to improve your NAQ via better application planning and writing. I hope what I share also helps prospective applicants to UBC Medicine to some degree. Story time. This is going to be a SUPER LONG one, so find a nice and comfortable seat, relax and maybe grab a nice cup of tea if you're wanting to read it all . I am a long-term applicant to UBC Medicine. This application is my 6th try, and it all started back in 2013/2014. That year, I submitted my first application to UBC Medicine while I was finishing up my final year of undergrad. I had a bunch of volunteering experiences, but wasn’t having high hopes for my application being successful. Sure enough, I received regrets pre-interview. I was quite disappointed, but thought of the bright side: At least, this was a great experience to familiarize myself with the application. In 2014, I met a variety of health care professionals and was given opportunities to pursue research, awesome volunteering positions, and much more, all of which I am most grateful to this day. I started brainstorming how I can make a positive impact on my community. One thing led to another and with the help of a small group of friends, I founded my own non-profit organization dedicated to helping communities via coordinating annual fundraising musical concerts and donating 100% of the proceeds to great causes. For the first year, my team members and I dedicated our event to my local hospital’s ER, as I was familiar with the ER since I had been volunteering there since 2011. The 2014/2015 application cycle came along, and I was excited to see how this application would turn out. I spent a lot of time carefully writing my application, rewording each entry, making sure the description is concise yet filled with details. When the interview status D-Day arrived, I was in tears of joy when I realized I received my first invite for UBC. Simply put, I could NOT stop dancing, so you can easily imagine the scene . I spent the next 2 months practicing for my interview, attended the large practice sessions and so on and so forth. In May, I was way more nervous than I had been for my interview notification. I decided to shut off my phone from the night before, check on Premed101 in the morning to see when everyone had received their results, and then to turn on my phone again. I did, but realized it was a rejection. I was devastated. I had a flashback of everything I had been through, knowing that I would need to repeat it all again. A week or two passed, and my head was cleared. My optimism resurfaced, and I realized what an accomplishment I’ve made: My NAQ had increased by ~10 points, from 24 (previous year) to ~34 (that year). Giving up now? No way, Jose! During that year, I did a whole bunch of new things ultimately enjoying what I did (as I still do), and as a byproduct it also helped my application. So, for the 2015/2016 application cycle, I spent more than 1 month to complete my application. I planned how to write every new entry, reworded my previous entries, and looked at all the details involved; once my application was complete, I also remodified it several times. When the interview notifications were released, I was ecstatic to know that I received another interview! Very much prepared, I decided to host the MMI Facebook group as I learned a lot from the individual leading the previous Facebook group from the previous year. I was so happy to meet some new people and also some of those who were reapplicants, in the same shoes as I was. Amidst the joy, there was one thing that had always been bothering me: My MCAT score. My old score was a mere 30, very mediocre. I sought guidance from my parents and they convinced me to sign up for an MCAT prep course – this was primarily because the new MCAT was rolled out, and I realized perhaps taking a prep course will prepare me for the new, tougher, longer exam. It was a very strange feeling to prepare for the interview and study for the MCAT again… something I did way back when I was preparing myself to begin my first application. I decided to study for the MCAT and write it in case things go south post-interview. Interview day came along, and I was ready. I did the best I could do and realized how different my interview experience was compared to the previous year; in other words, I felt a lot more confident. When offer notifications were about to be released in May, I was a mess – emotional rollercoaster since the second I woke up in the morning at 7 AM. I anxiously awaited my results. When the rejections wave passed and I got no notification, I suddenly felt an infinite spike of optimism and hope. But it was short-lived. At the time of the waitlist wave, I got a “ding!” on my phone and I knew what it was. I open my email and I see the subject line “UBC Undergrad Admissions: Application Status – Waitlist” and my heart sinks. Had I just survived that couple minutes of the wave, I would have been 180˚ different. Time passed and my head was cleared. I said, “Hey, this isn’t so bad! There is still hope, why am I so down?” I was grateful to have improved from last cycle at least. But the hope gradually dissipated when I wasn’t able to receive an offer from the waitlist. I improved from a Below Average to an Above Average, and my NAQ stayed at roughly ~34. Now, it was MCAT time. The next application cycle (2016/2017) for UBC, Admissions was allowing a final cycle where old MCAT exams were still being accepted. One of my very close friends who got accepted off the waitlist strongly advised me not to write the new MCAT, and just reapply and see what happens. God forbid, if I would get an ineligible score for UBC, none of my old MCAT exams would qualify as only the new attempt(s) count. But I was sure that my MCAT had to be the one thing holding me back. So, I registered for a late-June exam and started prepping my application for the early deadline. Late-June 2016 came and I was sitting at the exam centre at 7:30 AM, waiting to be registered. Wrote the exam, felt like crap, but somehow, I decided to score it – after all, I had put a lot of effort into it and spent a lot of money for my prep course, and I was sure that at least I got the minimums for UBC, so everything was going to be fine, right…? No…. Things didn’t turn out to be fine. My science sections were average but passing, just got the passing score on psych/soc with 124, but… but… but… I realized my CARS was 121 (the damn verbal reasoning, the bane of my existence, the archnemesis of my soul). It was freaking panic time now. I quickly registered for a late-August exam to at least get a passing score so that I am at least eligible. Late-August, 7:30 AM, same exam centre. The guy looks at me and says, “Oh hey, you were here before, right?” And I say with an uncomfortable laugh, “Oh yes, I’m trying to get a better score hopefully!” Wrote the exam, and felt actually a bit better about the CARS section. I still knew it was going to be horrible, but hopefully at least I get that 124. I go home and work on my application for the next week, finalize it and submit it for the early deadline. Late-September arrives. I am at my computer on the AAMC MCAT score release log-in screen. I enter my username, password, and click log in. I place a sheet of paper on my screen hiding all scores. The plan is to check chem/phys first, then bio, then psych/soc, and finally CARS. Chem/phys, bio, and psych/soc are all great actually – much better than before. I take the sheet of paper and unhide my CARS score. What…? Huh…? Surprise turns to disbelief, disbelief turns to anger, anger turns to panic and utter… utter fear. I see 119 besides CARS. How is this even possible…? You mean, I seriously got 1 point above the absolute minimum?? How… HOW… HOW?! Frustration, anger, panic. My head was exploding, blood pressure was low, and I was cold-sweating all over my body. The worse part was that many other bad things had happened to me that year, especially in the summer time. With this news added on, my world felt shattered… With the support of my friends and family, gradually optimism resurfaced again. With the volunteering connections I had built previously, one thing led to another and I transitioned into a full-time research position so smoothly, it felt like the sky opened and this job fell into my hands. In 2016, I started working at UBC Department of Psychiatry on a project focused on exploring the metabolic, genetic and immunological factors affecting those diagnosed with treatment-refractory schizophrenia, one of the most severe forms of mental illness. Also, in 2016, I reconnected with a dear, close friend via my cousin’s wedding who I had lost touch with since we were young. She became a very, very special person in my life. She lives in my previous home country (where I had immigrated from with my family as a child), so we had a long-distance relationship going. With the bad news of the MCAT and other things that were affecting me, suddenly 2016 didn’t seem so bad now. I worked for the whole year, did my volunteering, extracurricular activities and so forth, while restudying for my MCAT. Even though I was prepared, the last couple of exams took a huge toll on my confidence, and I was still very nervous for my exam. I registered for an early summer 2017 exam just in case I don’t make it. I write the exam, don’t know how to feel. My results come out, sciences have all improved even more, but my CARS… 122. Another big hit to my confidence. But hey, it’s okay because I have another opportunity to write an exam, right? I register for another in August 2017, and write the exam, feeling maybe I did it this time. Results come out. Sciences are spectacular, but CARS… 123… why is this happening…? Why is life s***ing on me like this…? You think previous times I had a major hit to my confidence? No way, Jose. This was the biggest hit to my confidence… A score of 123 is basically 1 or 2 correct answers from a 124. I was embarrassed. I felt so disappointed to let down my coworkers, close friends, and family who were all rooting for me. Another year of being ineligible… By the way, these 2 years of being ineligible, I was still applying to UBC because I didn’t want to break my consistency. I wanted UBC to see that I still care and I am still trying, even though they don’t do a file review when you’re ineligible. The fall of 2017 at least became one of the best times of my life. I took vacation from work and my family and I planned a trip to go visit my girlfriend and her family. While there, I proposed to her and I heard the sweetest “Yes” of my life. We had an engagement party and got legally married (on paper), since the two go together in my culture (and the wedding ceremony is usually within a year or two after). I then returned back to Canada soon after because I could only get a short vacation, and started working on her immigration application. I used the year to again work, actually working multiple jobs, doing a whole bunch of volunteering, doing way more than I have ever done to not have it appear that I’ve “plateaued”. Finally, 2018 comes and I start the whole routine of studying for the MCAT… all… over… again. At this point, I’m drenched in volunteering and work, while maintaining my MCAT studying schedule. Again, I register for an early summer exam just in case so that I have another opportunity late August. I write the exam, no idea how CARS went. I get my results back, and yet again… CARS is 123. At this point, my confidence has been kicked around, chipped, and 99% eaten away. But I put these thoughts away and force myself to think positively; after all, it’s only maximum 2 questions away to 124. I have one more chance for this next application cycle for August. Luckily, I’m able to register for another exam for August 25, 2018. Another 7:30 AM at the exam centre. I write it, and something inside ever so slightly tells me… maybe. As soon as the exam is over, I prepare myself to take a vacation to spend a month to visit my wife on the other side of the planet. I really enjoyed the trip; we spent quality time and made memories which will last forever. However, on the inside, mentally my mind is asking the “what if” regarding my CARS. This was my 6th attempt for the new MCAT exam… if this didn’t work, I had to think of something. Perhaps the Caribbean schools, or the European or Australian schools. But what would that mean for my wife? If she immigrated to Canada, where would she stay? Would she come with me? Would she stay in Canada and we have to live a few years of our lives apart other than the short visits? She wants to continue her education in Canada, so her studies matter a lot too. These lingering thoughts bothered me everywhere I went and I was neck-deep in internally-hidden anxiety. When I returned to Canada in late October after my vacation, my exam result had already been released in mid-September yet I hadn’t checked it (only released the scores to UBC). Even the thought of logging into AAMC makes my heart pump hard and sends my thoughts racing. But eventually, I control myself: “I can do it,” I say. I bring up the AAMC MCAT score release website screen, take 5 full, deep breaths before I log in even though I'm nauseous as hell. Again, I hide the scores on the screen with a piece of paper and check each with CARS last. My chem/phys is 130 (wonderful), bio is 130 (excellent), and psych/soc is 129 (wow, best I’ve had!). As I’m about to reveal CARS, internally and externally I start praying for just a 124 or more. I reveal… and… it’s a… 125. 125?! OMG!!! Surprise turns to disbelief, disbelief turns to joy, joy turns to tears and utter… utter happiness. I’ve made it… I’ve made it!!! I instantly feel so much weight, tons and tons of load get released off my shoulders. I can’t believe it finally happened. After 6 whole tries, I can finally be eligible again. And here I am. I have been through every part of the spectrum other than being accepted; rejected pre-interview, to rejected post-interview, to being waitlisted-rejected, to being ineligible. For me, it’s one of the best feelings in the world to be eligible to apply. And now with receiving an interview invitation… I do not even have the words to truly express how thankful and grateful I am. Through this whole process, I have learned one of the hardest ways to never take anything for granted, and always appreciate the things you have in this moment. Even though life seemed impossible, I never stopped fighting for what I really care about; I never gave up. Even if I don’t become accepted this cycle, I will continue to battle the challenges of my life and will not stop pursuing my dream. If medicine is your dream too, don’t let it remain a dream. Continue to push through the dark times because there is always good around you. The experiences that you accumulate in life will eventually aid you to become stronger, more mature, more professional, well-rounded, and more, which primarily help you become successful in life in general, but also with pursuing medicine. Know that whatever you do, you’re not wasting your time. I define “wasting your time” as when you’re sitting on your butt and not doing anything for your future. Down the road, no one will ask when you completed your MD, no one cares that you’re an amazing, experienced physician when you’re 50 as compared to when you could have been 47, for example. Medicine is a life-long career. What really matters is that you enter medical school when you’re ready, because that’s when you can take the most out of your program and be the best future physician you can be. Like I mentioned earlier, anything you do now will ultimately help you in what comes after MD, such as in CaRMS, which is quite important. Lastly, I want to point out one important note. Medicine is very important when it’s your passion. But, there are always things that are way more important than it, such as love, family, and friends. It was through my failures that I met my wife. If I had a choice to reverse time and be accepted to medicine back in 2016/2017 by not re-writing my MCAT (lots of ifs), I would have not taken this offer. Because then I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to gain experience in my work field that I have now, I wouldn’t have met all the wonderful people through my jobs, and most importantly… maybe I wouldn’t have met my wife. This just comes to show that medicine, although a true passion, shouldn't be on a pedestal. As I go with the flow, it will happen when it happens, as long as I don’t give up. Long story short, I strongly encourage you guys to please, at the least, consider not giving up yet. I’m sure you all have your personal challenges, but let my story inspire you. Let your inner optimism resurface, too. Gain the support of your family, relatives, friends, coworkers, and seek their guidance. And please know that I am here – if you’d like to chat, I would love to listen. If I can help in any way, please PM me.
  7. 24 points
    ADMISSION !!!!! J'en reviens pas!!! J'ai littéralement fixé mon écran pendant 5 minutes sans aucune réaction. Je comprenais pas!!! Après 2 ans de cégep de HESS, 2 ans d'uni, enfin j'ai atteint mon objectif ! - réponse : admission - contingent : universitaire régulier, en cours de bac - stats (cote, MEM, #LA) : cote 35.7, MEM 550. 1ère fois aux MEM Pour les autres refusés ou sur la LA, SVP n'abandonnez pas !! Vous êtes capable, je le pense vraiment.
  8. 20 points
    sorry for the late post, been busy pinching myself and crying all day!! TIME STAMP: ~14h30 pm (heart attack since 9 am)  Result: Admitted with condition !!! pre-reqGPA: 4,00 (redid my 4 basic pre-reqs at Athabasca, Thomson Rivers), old pre-req GPA was 3,01 MCAT: Not submitted Feeling About MMI (please be mindful of NDA): This was my 4th time interviewing at McGill, so I felt confortable with the process (I could've basically rehearsed their ppt slide), so I was a lot more relaxed and went in there being 1000% authentic (cheesy I know but its true). Felt like I was great in 3 stations, 1 below average and the rest pretty average IP/OOP/International: IP Comment : I've been applying to med school for 7 years!!! This was my 4th interview at McGill, I was straight up refused all 3 cycles before being admitted this year with no WL. Anyone with refusals, I know it sucks, I know your hurt. You need to keep trying and you need to push through if this is what you want. If anyone wants to chat PM me!!!
  9. 19 points
    If people are wanting to take legal action regarding a single medical school rejection, then I think admissions is doing their job correctly in keeping you out.
  10. 18 points
    Felt I should add my stats in here because I’m super stoked and would want someone like me who was applying to see this... 2013 was my first application to medical schools in Canada, 2019 was my 1st interview at UBC. Accepted, VFMP (1st Choice) TIME STAMP: 11:56am PSTEarly or Regular Deadline: RegularAGPA (if applicable): ~83MCAT: 124 in CARS, 513 overall. Geography: IP Educational background: BSc and MSc (Thesis) in basic science , plus some Continuing Ed. ECs: Not an Olympian. Didn’t have any publications from my Master’s degree until after the June deadline, but some poster presentations. My weak GPA didn’t get me on the Dean’s Honours List. BUT I had years and years of service/volunteering/philanthropy, student governance and policy work during high school and university years, working in marginalised communities in BC and Quebec, experiences from my life that let me be in leadership roles outside of school, finding a true pride being a member of the LGBTQ2S+ community, and having made genuine connections with people that supported me over many, many years and were so thrilled to be verifiers (and making me cry seeing their genuine excitement when I told them I got in). Honestly, it took a village to raise me and they were all included in my application. Interview: I worked a full-time and part-time job while prepping for interviews, but all I can say is that I spent NUMEROUS hours working with friends, colleagues, anyone who I could find that wanted to spend the time to give me honest feedback to prepare. I wanted the input of non-applicants (I wasn’t here for the biased opinions and shadiness, and that’s the T), and I went in feeling great. I read articles for 5 hours a day to understand what was going on. I listened to podcasts while I worked. I watched the evening news before going to bed. Unfortunately, getting to the interview day and walking up to the first station, it was an out of body experience that I didn’t anticipate and my anxiety got the best of me. I know I had brought enough into the conversations, but it wasn’t at my best — however, I was happy to know that it was enough. Having low grades and a threshold CARS score was really pushing me to prove my worth in the interview and I did (and I’m so proud of that). The acceptance email comes and the grades no longer matter, the number of times I tried and wrote the MCAT no longer matter, the years of failed and rejected applications no longer matter. I’m looking forward. Forward to a new chapter and new beginning. Getting into medical school is easy for some with the grades and the privileges, however, without those, it’s full of hurdles. Jumping over enough of them will eventually get you to the finish line. One yes is all you need.
  11. 18 points
    My friend just sent me an email titled, "Acceptance to McMaster Medical School". Unfriended.
  12. 18 points
    We are getting close, but you forgot to factor in the lunar cycles 2014 (Jan 24) was the last quarter visible at 47% 2015 (Jan 21) was a new moon visible at 2% 2016 (Jan 13) was a waxing crescent visible at 18% 2017 (Jan 18) was the last quarter visible at 64% 2018 (Jan 10) was a new moon visible at 2% Hmm, I'm starting to see a correlation here It's going to be in the next waxing crescent moon, so the 10th or 11th lol
  13. 17 points
    warthog

    May 14 Countdown

    The Cycle of Waiting 1. Hoping: “I have good stats, I think! I did okay in the interview...let me check the Accepted/Rejected/Waitlist thread again...” 2. Imagining: “If I get in, what will I do? Who do I tell first? What do I put on my Facebook? Omg I’d have to quit my job. Would I cry?.” 3. Someone asks you “What’s up?” or “How are you doing?” Or EVEN WORSE: “Any word yet?” This derails your confidence immediately. 4. Racing Heart: “crap crap crap what if I don’t get in? I’d have to tell everyone right? I’d have to start over...I’d have to retake the MCAT.” *lurks on PM101, r/MCAT and r/premed to torture self* 5. Wallowing: “I am not a competitive applicant. I shouldn’t have applied. I wonder what the career prospects are like for goat herding?” *aggressive googling* *cycles through memory of the interview for the trillionth time* *spends weirdly long time reading the medical school website when you’ve memorized it already* *a lot of sighing* 6. Try to Distract Yourself: Start reading books you’ve read already, start going on weird subreddit and YouTube spirals, start researching alpaca farming. “I wonder what Snooki is up to these days?” Wallow/Hoping cycle begins again. You wonder if you should’ve just gone into banking or teaching or public service like everyone else. More sighing. You go on YouTube again. 6. The cycle restarts.
  14. 16 points
    Instagrammar

    GPA chance

    Honestly, when I found out my GPA was only 5.0 on a 4.0 scale, I almost just gave up. I realized my GPA would hold me back so I just grabbed the holy CanMed infinity stones - Cerulean Communicator, Carmine Collaborator, Lilac Leader, Salmon Scholar, Hazel Health Advocate, and a Purple Professional Stone. When I combined my CanMed infinity stones, I was able to overcome my GPA. I hope this helps!
  15. 16 points
    Poloma

    UBC Post Interview Impressions.

    I called admissions - they said right now they plan for May 10 but they’ll update us with an email around May 1
  16. 16 points
    While I acknowledge people's frustration over changing goalposts, I think Western's change this year is commendable. The reality is, high MCAT and GPA scores are not good predictors of who will become good physician. The aamc has been looking into how medical students and physicians perform based on their entrance scores, and there is no significant difference between someone with a 132 CARS and a 126, for example. Even more importantly, arbitrarily high cutoffs unnecessarily favour more privileged students (those who can afford tutors, expensive prep courses, not having to work for a summer while they study) and results in less class diversity. By lowering cutoffs in favour of an additional aABS, Western is taking steps to ensure that they've still selected students who are likely to succeed academically, but come from more diverse backgrounds and will better reflect the patient populations they'll be serving. As for the quality of someone's EC's, don't assume that just because you've done something unique or flashy, that it holds more value than someone else's accomplishments. Just because Candidate 1 could afford to take a summer off to travel and do charity work in another country, doesn't mean that experience holds any more value than the experiences of Candidate 2, who had to work full time in customer service to support their family. File reviewers are often trained to look for these issues, and would be asked to look through essays and evaluate personal character or what was learned from an experience, not what was actually done. TLDR; Thinking you have the best scores or flashiest ECs does not make you any more deserving than anyone else, and expressing sentiments of entitlement really make your privilege show.
  17. 15 points
    While this is a very exciting day for many this can be a devastating day for others. For that reason, I am leaving the number for Crisis Services Canada - 1-833.456.4566. Wishing everyone the best when receiving today's news. ♥
  18. 15 points
    warthog

    May 14 Countdown

    It kind of feels weird knowing that in less than 24 hours, the trajectory of my life could be drastically different. On the other hand, I sincerely wish you all the best of luck!!! Regardless of the result, you took on this process. You committed to every step, and you made it this far — there are many that didn’t!
  19. 15 points
    I don't usually post my stats anymore since they've basically remained the same from my posts 2 years ago. I'll make an exception in this time just because of how -relatively- little data usually gets contributed here. TIME STAMP: Feb 21 2019, 11:17 EST Interview Date: March 30 Result: Interview (MD) cGPA: 3.96 (by rounding) MCAT: Passed cutoffs ECs: Filled up all 32 items this year, but I've had an interview back when I had 21/48 items. Diverse and met each of UofT's clusters quite well. Essays: Spent at least 1.5 months on them, at least 400 hours. Was it overkill? To be honest, probably. I'm not a bad writer by any means, but when it comes to pieces with word limits, I believe in the importance of articulating each idea as succulently and artistically as possible. My grades did suffer but I wanted to write essays that could stand strong among a diverse audience of readers (which is to be reasonably expected of) and leave myself without regret. All of the topics strongly resonated with my experiences and I had a lot to share. If anything, future readers should find this observation helpful: having exchanged essay reviewing with some of my friends, I've come to realize that there isn't a single, uniform writing style that really makes the magic happen. Some of my friends briefly addressed the question within a single few sentences, then built their entire essays on how their experiences met the four clusters. Personally, I dedicated almost half my word count towards giving a thorough answer/solution before briefly sharing some personal experiences. We all got an interview. Year: Graduated UG Geography: OOP Two years ago, I did horribly on my interview. I knew my application wasn't strong: I had a weak reference, few extracurriculars and ultimately, couldn't hold up to applicants with an amazing wealth of experience behind them. I was invited during the final week and suspected that I had only marginally scraped into getting an interview. I convinced myself that the odds weren't in my favour and let myself fall. Last year I didn't take my essays as seriously enough and got rejected March 16th. Firstly, the topics just didn't click with my experiences. Secondly, seeing that I already had been previously been invited, I grew extremely over-confident and complacent in my writing. I got no interviews from any school during this year. Each interview is a privilege. Each year, med schools get more and more amazing applications, either from those who have come back strong after a previous rejection, or new talented applicants. Perhaps I'm just on this site too often, but getting accepted 4th year doesn't seem as common as it once was. In any case, I'm extremely grateful to have another chance of making things right.
  20. 15 points
    Problem with your logic is that you think the system is goofed up or that the incoming class is somehow "screwed". They aren't. The wheels will keep turning and those that get in will continue along the process with zero functional difference. Just so happens John Doe took a seat instead of you. Got in on slightly different requirements/process but equally as qualified and capable of doing well in medicine. Dont get sucked into a false sense of superiority by having a marginally better GPA or MCAT score.
  21. 15 points
    I very much doubt 1 single individual read all 8 of your essays. It was likely divided among 8 people, with the average of your responses being taken as your final score. This is how it works in CASPer, for UoT, MMI, etc. The admissions office of every school has the right to change their admission criteria from one year to the next. Western is not unique in this circumstance. To be honest, I actually admire Western for changing their criteria to allow character elements to shine through compared to the archaic method of using only GPA and MCAT. As I mentioned to you before in a previous post, possessing a good MCAT or GPA, while important, are not the sole factors that determine whether or not someone is good enough for med school. IMO, focus on your other interviews at those Ivy schools. Perhaps take a little bit of time to reflect. Likening yourself to a 'Syrian refugee' screams to me that your line of thinking needs to come down a notch.
  22. 15 points
    ha, it has been 10 years on the forum - kind of scary. The journey is long but in the end worth it I think. Stay frosty and focused people
  23. 14 points
    duckduckgoose18

    McMaster Waitlist Party

    Accepted to Hamilton! Fell out of my chair when I got the news! Timestamp: 10:05AM Thanks to everyone here for your support and fingers crossed for anyone still waiting.
  24. 14 points
    hiyayosup

    Waitlist Thread 2019

    I just want to take a few minutes to thank the many people on this forum who have been available to me over the past few years, months, and (especially) weeks. Without going into too much detail, I wanted to share that I had a difficult experience a few years ago that changed me as a person and set me back several years. When I first decided to pursue this field, very few people in my personal life believed I could do it. It wasn’t until I found this community that I was bombarded by a constant stream of advice, encouragement, comfort, and support. All I can think to say right now is thank you. Thank you to the many people who have reached out to me via PM, on this thread, and on others to calm my fears and worries, share their strength, and give hope. Thank you for teaching me to believe in myself when no one else did. Thank you for disproving the premed stereotype. Just thank you. I promise I will pay it forward. To current/future applicants: If this is your dream and you are sincere in your intentions and efforts, it WILL happen for you. You are already enough. Continue striving to be the best version of yourself. And during those late night studying sessions and weekend lab hours when you’re asking yourself “Is this worth it?,” I want you to know: Yes it is.
  25. 14 points
    hiyayosup

    Waitlist Thread 2019

    GOT OFF THE WAITLIST. Today at 12:02 PM. Omg. I am dreaming. Too emotional right now. Will edit later.
  26. 14 points
    Accepted!! Story post to follow in the 'Non-trad success stories'.
  27. 14 points
    ysera

    May 14 Countdown

    Kawhi Leonard is my daddy
  28. 14 points
    A year ago, I was in your shoes. I did not know if all the years of studies I had worked towards were worth it. If all the volunteering, wishing and dreaming was going to lead me somewhere. An interview is unpredictable and I could very easily throw it all away. I just want to tell you all to have confidence in yourself. You were selected for a reason. You all have the potential to become medical students. This year or next year, don't give up. Whatever you are feeling is normal. Everyone feels this way. Every single person in the room you will be in. Here is my advice for interviews : There is no definite answer key for scenarios. Complete the required task. Don't be afraid to verbalize your thought process. No one is trying to trick you. Don't overthink the scenarios. One bad station happens to everyone. Actors and interviewers will sometime seem 'distant' because they have to remain neutral. Don't take it personally. If you have completed a station and are satisfied within time, you don't need to force yourself to add more information. I guess all I am trying to say is : I truly wish you all the best on your interviews. May our paths cross soon!
  29. 14 points
    Congratulations to all who got an interview! Try to start looking into the MMI process and preparing early, time really flies! There are plenty of resources lying around the forum, so take advantage of that. For those looking for more MMI questions to prepare with, try googling "korean premed mmi questions", you should find a pretty big list. Psychologically preparing yourself for emotionally/socially uncomfortable/awkward situations and remaining calm under all circumstances are really key, so try yourself at these sample scenarios and whatever else you can find until you feel like you're ready to take on whatever they might throw at you when the big day comes around. Also very happy to see some familiar usernames from last year I really really hope it works out for you guys this year. To the applicants who didn't get an invite this year and are really disappointed right now, I hope you'll feel better soon. It's an unreasonably competitive process, so while you should take a step back and re-evaluate, especially when the stats come out later in the cycle, you also really shouldn't let this result affect your sense of self-worth. Most importantly, don't let this hurdle put your life on pause; keep living life to the fullest outside of medicine, and the rest will fall in place.
  30. 14 points
    I AM SO EXCITED TO RECEIVE MY REJECTION
  31. 13 points
    RPN-RN-MD

    McMaster Waitlist Party

    Accepted to Hamilton off of the waitlist! Timestamp: 1924, June 13th Thank you guys for waiting with me, we suffered together, and the more fortunate ones of us will now study together. And for all who didn't make it (yet, there are still a couple weeks left!) stay strong and have pride in the fact that you were among the strongest applicants of the entire year. See you in August, Cheers (P.S. Wendy Edge told me that they have just dealt with the deferral requests, and that had free up a couple spots)
  32. 13 points
    steelchopsticks

    McMaster Waitlist Party

    I dont even know how to say this right now... I’m at the gym finishing off a heavy squat day and the news almost knocked me clean over. Thank you to everyone here for helping me through one of the hardest months of my life... I cant wait to meet some of you in person in August... ACCEPTED! NIagara Regional Campus (2nd choice) email: 3:03 pm Its drinks on me baby! Goodluck to everyone else. Will definitely be accepting :).
  33. 13 points
    Premed_Girl

    Waitlist Thread 2019

    Also accepted off waitlist (and also interviewed off the waitlist)!! 5+ years of undergrad, 1 master's degree, multiple MCAT retakes, 3 research labs and countless hours of sleepless nights later and I finally made it! First-generation doctor in my family .. I will write more later but please be proud of yourselves however far you've come!! I never thought that I would make it but here I am!!
  34. 13 points
    RichardHammond

    May 14 Countdown

    "
  35. 13 points
    Not to be rude, but why ask this? You have a perfect GPA in last 2 years and a high MCAT that meets all schools' cut-offs.. You have the classic pre-med ECs: varsity team, research, undergrad clubs, awards- so you are all set.
  36. 13 points
    Little late, but was overwhelmed with the joy and excitment during the day. Result: ADMITTED WITH CONDITION Sci GPA: approx 3.60 --> after retaking several courses. 6th application, 3rd interview - DO NOT GIVE UP.
  37. 13 points
    Hi - although your distressing past experiences have left an impact on you, you have evidently had the strength to move on and make a fresh start, developing satisfying interpersonal relationships and succeeding in gaining admission to medical school. You should be commended on rising above your previous experiences and living well as a way of overcoming the actions of those who tried to put you down. If you let them hold you back now, it would negate the gains you have made, effectively letting them 'win.' You may be surprised - people may develop more moral conscience as they mature, and could regret their previous actions. However, even if they don't, you don't need your classmates to successfully get through medical school. Interacting with people going through the same experiences as you is not necessarily a blessing, as it can also mean competition. Most schools will have student advisors and students from upper years to provide guidance. For emotional support, you have your family and friends outside medical school. Don't worry about socializing in medical school - your goal is to become a doctor, so just pass your exams in pre-clerkship and conduct yourself professionally throughout your clerkship rotations. Maintain a polite distance from your former classmates and if anyone instigates trouble, they can be held accountable for lapses in professionalism. However, hopefully nothing of the sort will happen, as again the teen/early adult years are a period of maturation, and if nothing else, people at this stage should be more reluctant to be involved in anything that could harm their careers. There will be other students in your medical school class, and hopefully you can find a like-minded individual or individuals, but if not, it is not a big deal. The four years are busy and will be over before you know it, and then you can make a fresh start in residency.
  38. 13 points
  39. 13 points
    cb80

    Entrer en med avec la pire cote r ever

    À 25 ans je doute fort qu'il ira faire un 2e DEC. D'ailleurs, ses notes de sciences humaines vont toujours trainer sa moyenne vers le bas. Je suis curieuse de savoir pourquoi tu parles d'exception? C'est par rapport à ton âge? Par rapport à ta motivation du moment? Au fait que tu parles anglais? Qu'est-ce qui justifie une exception en ta faveur? Il faut comprendre que les gens qui font médecine sont pratiquement tous des gens qui ont des A+ depuis la maternelle... J'ai fait médecine dentaire et la pire cote R au niveau cégep était de l'ordre des 33,500 cette année-là. Je vais dire tout haut ce que les autre pensent certainement tout bas, c'est un peu beaucoup ambitieux pour le moindre, de dire que tu peux très bien accomplir ce programme alors que tu n'as même pas fait de cours de sciences à date. Réducteur d'autant plus de croire que tu mérites la place d'un autre qui a buché beaucoup plus. Un 98 en anglais, c'est bien, mais avoir ce 98 à l'examen final sans remettre les travaux pendant la session, ce n'est pas admirable. D'ailleurs, tout le monde en médecine est bilingue là, voire trilingue. Les notes, mais aussi la constance sont requis. Aussi un peu d'humilité.
  40. 13 points
    Western's previous over-reliance on quantitative objectives has resulted in some barely-functioning manchildren being in my class since year 1, and judging from the replies in this thread (legal action l.o.l), the new system is keeping many such people out, so I'm all for it. Perhaps it's time for an attitude adjustment and self reflection if you think you're entitled to anything in this game.
  41. 13 points
    Result: Regrets Time Stamp: 9:00 am Interview Date: N/A wGPA: 3.97 (last two years of undergrad) Year: finishing masters at harvard MCAT: 509 (128/126/128/127) <- probably the issue ECs: executive on same clubs for 4 years, president of 2 clubs, founded not for profit, 1 first author publication and 1 co-authorship under journal review, work study research position in undergrad, various other miscellaneous activities in student society and clubs, I think I had strong referees? (had Rhodes interview based on them so don’t really think it could’ve been an issue with the letters...) Geography: Ontario Ive never posted on forums before because I really struggle with imposter syndrome and am super self conscious comparing myself against all the amazing candidates here. However, since Queens makes the application process extra difficult by not posting any statistics/criteria I thought I would contribute in case it could help someone. I also just wanted to say that I have a few friends that didn’t get any interviews for 2 years in a row and then managed to gain admission to multiple medical schools in their 3rd attempt. A lot of these admission processes can be quite flawed and may take students that may not make the best doctors while missing out on those that would. Even this year I know of someone who received an interview invite who not only failed a class due to a breach of academic integrity but also obtained a few publications in their name because their uncle was a surgeon. I’ve personally found it difficult to reconcile feeling like I’m not good enough in the face of knowing of cases like this. At the end of the day though what keeps me going is that (hopefully) hard work will pay off and things will work out for the best. I hope we can all take invites and rejections with a grain of salt, and continue to be kind to ourselves during this process. Wish you all the best :)
  42. 13 points
    ATG4B

    Interview Invites date?

    For everyone who is not getting the news they wanted today ... I want to tell you a little bit more about me in the hopes that it will bolster your spirit to keep pushing forward. I was all set to apply in 2006, but a family member became very ill and I had to put my dreams on hold. I tried several times over the coming years to go back to school, but I couldn’t manage to juggle full time work and full time school. It wasn’t until I turned 30 that I decided to sell pretty much everything I had in order to head back to school. It has been far from an easy road, but I wouldn’t change it for anything! I’m definitely not the same person I was in 2006 and I appreciate every opportunity for the blessing that it is. I don’t know what this year has in store for me, but I do know that I’m a hell of a lot stronger than I thought I was. You will find that out about yourself too if you keep pushing ahead. Be kind to yourself right now and know that one (or even many) regret email, doesn’t define you in any way! Hugs to you all.
  43. 13 points
    brockboeser6

    NAQ - Overcoming adversity

    Thanks for you input. I'm going to be quite honest with you. I would suggest in your future career as a doctor not to ever mention to someone, that has gone through a traumatic event, that they are "milking" the situation. It shows a severe lack of empathy, understanding and maturity and minimizes their experience.
  44. 12 points
    After having been a loooooooooong time lurker, I finally made an account today. And I finally get to put my post here, in the non-trad success stories, a thread I have been reading since 2010-2011. This will be a long one people, so settle in if you are going to read this post. I would say I am about as non-traditional as it gets. In the socio-economic gradient I come from (blue collar- think truck drivers and farmers), higher education is not really a thing. Most people graduate from high school, maybe do some college, and get comfortable in a middle class job until retirement. Which there is nothing wrong with. Unless, of course, you are me, graduating from high school many many years ago, and dreaming about medicine. The thing with coming from this kind of background is that there is no cultural capital to support you through learning the ropes of higher education. If there is one thing I have learned over the years, is that this “vertical transmission” of knowledge is implicit in many (most?) premed students, who have usually had the (implicit) knowledge that after high school, you go to you university, get good grades, make connections with professors and mentors who can support you. Obvious, right? Not for me, it wasn’t. I knew I wanted medicine, I knew it was my calling. But I didn’t know how to get there, and without the support of anyone, at 19, it was difficult to know how to do this. Here’s a quote from the high school career counsellor when I told her I wanted to go into medicine: “Mmmmm… I don’t know… why don’t you become an elementary school teacher instead?”. So I believed them. I believed those who said I could not make it, and after high school, I took a different path in another field. My career in this other field was successful in many ways: I have gained a profound emotional intelligence, I have learned to overcome obstacles, get back up and keep going when you hit a wall, I have learned to connect with people in a way that builds quality long lasting relationships and memorable short encounters. But this path ran its course, and it’s at 29 years old that I realized that it was time. I was yearning to be a doctor. But what were the odds? Here I was, low-income, with no degree, at an age where most people are graduating with a MD. But I had suppressed the part of me who wanted to go into medicine for long enough, and now it had resurfaced in a way I couldn’t ignore. So I started a degree from scratch. I had all the doubts in the world, but I had to at least try. I did well in my degree. Actually, I did well in the last few years of my degree. The return-to-school after a decade of using your right brain (my past career required a lot of creativity) and letting your left brain shrivel did no good for my first and to some extent second year grades. I was seeing the dream fade away. So I put my head down, and studied. Hard. I lost all my friends because I missed all their birthdays/baby showers/stags. But “I had a dream”, as they say. And I had to gamble it all, live in poverty while my peers were getting mortgages, lose all my friends, just in case it was worth it. Just in case I could get into medicine. And in 2012, after all these years of hard work, I was ready. I applied to medical school, hopeful and confident. And I failed to even get an interview. It was crushing. What med students and posters on this forum tell you when you don’t get in is to live your life as fully as you can, and do something that you find interesting. And I did. I completed a Master’s in a topic I loved (medicine-related), and found a job I thought would be great. And then another job, because the first one wasn’t as great as I thought it would be. And then another one. The problem was that all these jobs really felt, and were, like plan B, and medicine kept gnawing at me. I was in my early thirties by then, I had met someone, and I felt the societal pressure of it was time to get a job and get on with it. But you know what? Deep down, I knew that if I wouldn’t give it one more try, I would always wonder “what if”. My MCAT was still eligible for one more year, so I applied. And got rejected pre-interview. So I studied the MCAT again (while working full time), and I did well enough (not awesome but not awful) that I could apply again. And I did. And finally, finally, after 4 application cycles, got an interview. This was the most exciting news of my life. I prepared, read, practiced, bought new clothes. But mid-May came, and with it, my rejection post-interview. Damn. What a blow. And I am not getting any younger here. So the next application cycle (my fifth), I applied across Canada, and received 3 interviews. Mid-May came around, and this time I had a rejection from my home school (again), a waitlist, and… wait, what…is this… an acceptance?? “Dear medschool40&cool, on the behalf of the admission committee, we are pleased to accept you in our program”. My life flashed in front of my eyes at that moment. Me, in high school getting the highest grades but a scoff when I brought up med school. Me, in my early to mid twenties, living under the poverty line, and with no knowledge of the academic world. Me, with a dream. Me, rebuilding myself up, learning the ropes, developing relationships with mentors, writing first-author articles. Me, finally, getting into med school. Passing the threshold. Changing world. Getting into med school the closest I have ever been to a religious experience. I will, after all, be a MD. (Take that, guidance counsellor from high school). One last note: It is unusual to get into med school this late in life (I'm 39 now). And I would lie if I would say I am not worried. I am worried about the stigma, for one. I am worried about fitting in to some extent. I am worried agism will play in whenever Carms comes. But I'll keep posting here and let you know, if you're interested, how this all plays out over the next 4 years.
  45. 12 points
    Dr. Un Jour

    Refus: score MEM trop bas

    Hey @haenurplaza, Je pense que ce n'était pas du tout personnel, ou par rapport à toi ! Il faut savoir que les évaluateurs doivent rester aussi neutre que possible et donc éviter toute expression, ce qui laisse souvent à penser qu'ils sont froids ou contre toi. De plus, il ne faut pas non plus oublier que le but justement des MEM c'est de te faire douter, alors peu importe ce que tu dis, ils auraient réagi de la même façon selon moi... Alors voilà ! Je voulais juste te dire que ce n'est pas facile, mais il ne faut pas que tu laisses entrer ce doute là dans ta tête ! Si tu as su par toi même que ce n'était pas pour toi alors soit, mais si c'est ton rêve, ne ferme pas tout à fait la porte simplement à cause de l'expression des évaluateurs, parce que ça fait partie du processus ! Et pour tous ceux qui ont reçu une mauvaise nouvelle également... Keep your head up, soyez fiers de vous et la prochaine fois, impressionnez-les ! Vous êtres tous bons et capables hihi ! Je vous souhaite que du bon pour la suite !
  46. 12 points
    Poloma

    UBC Post Interview Impressions.

    Buraries, loans, and grants are all good and fun BUT NONE OF IT MATTERS IF THEY NEVER TELL US IF WE GOT IN #wherethatemailat
  47. 12 points
  48. 12 points
    yake

    Interview Invites date?

    Last year the rejections went around around 5. I remember being in your shoes during finals last December trying to keep my heart from exploding, now I'm sullenly studying away for UBC med finals. My heart is with y'all, whatever news you may or may not hear today doesn't define you and shouldn't negatively impact your dream of becoming a physician
  49. 12 points
    Just wanted to point out that in order to "choose money over medicine", one would have to be accepted into medical school first. You can't truly choose between two options if you are only offered one option.
  50. 12 points
    Thank you for sharing your story. It must have taken a lot of courage to post it and I am listening. You’ve been through so much and I can’t imagine how difficult it must be for you right now, but I truly commend your resilience. The fact that you are here today and able to post your story, shows what a strong and amazing person you are. In undergrad, we meet many intelligent, seemingly perfect people; however, in reality, no one is truly perfect. Everyone has their own anxieties and flaws that they deal with. We think others are perfect because we can’t read what they’re really thinking in their minds. My best advice for you is to stop worrying about what others are doing. I know it’s hard, but please try. Statistically, medical schools do tend to favor applicants with higher GPAs; however, that’s only one aspect of the application. I know many students who were able to gain entrance with low GPAs by excelling in other parts of their application. Things like the MCAT, extracurriculars, jobs, Casper, volunteer activities, sports , letters of recommendation, and etc., can all make an impact on your application. Medical schools are looking for people who can become good doctors and not people who can just score well on exams. I am a medical student and I didn’t have a 90% average in undergrad. I am definitely not perfect and I have made many mistakes throughout my life. I have anxieties about school and I worry a lot. However, after talking with many of my classmates, most medical students (and students in general) in fact feel the same way. And that’s okay. I also got into medical school quite late —at the age of 28. So don’t worry about having to get to medical school within a certain standardized time frame or age. I understand being delayed one year in grade 10 may seem like a setback, but the path to medicine is different for everyone. Do what is best for you. If medicine is truly your dream, definitely do not give up. Focus on your strengths and improve your weaknesses. Do things that have meaning for you and things that make you happy. Spend time with the ones you love and take care of your health. Lastly, please remember to Give yourself more love. Give yourself more kindess. Give yourself more forgiveness. I wish you all the best and please take care. Feel free to pm if you need to talk.
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