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  1. 14 points
    Congratulations to all who got an interview! Try to start looking into the MMI process and preparing early, time really flies! There are plenty of resources lying around the forum, so take advantage of that. For those looking for more MMI questions to prepare with, try googling "korean premed mmi questions", you should find a pretty big list. Psychologically preparing yourself for emotionally/socially uncomfortable/awkward situations and remaining calm under all circumstances are really key, so try yourself at these sample scenarios and whatever else you can find until you feel like you're ready to take on whatever they might throw at you when the big day comes around. Also very happy to see some familiar usernames from last year I really really hope it works out for you guys this year. To the applicants who didn't get an invite this year and are really disappointed right now, I hope you'll feel better soon. It's an unreasonably competitive process, so while you should take a step back and re-evaluate, especially when the stats come out later in the cycle, you also really shouldn't let this result affect your sense of self-worth. Most importantly, don't let this hurdle put your life on pause; keep living life to the fullest outside of medicine, and the rest will fall in place.
  2. 13 points
    Result: Regrets Time Stamp: 9:00 am Interview Date: N/A wGPA: 3.97 (last two years of undergrad) Year: finishing masters at harvard MCAT: 509 (128/126/128/127) <- probably the issue ECs: executive on same clubs for 4 years, president of 2 clubs, founded not for profit, 1 first author publication and 1 co-authorship under journal review, work study research position in undergrad, various other miscellaneous activities in student society and clubs, I think I had strong referees? (had Rhodes interview based on them so don’t really think it could’ve been an issue with the letters...) Geography: Ontario Ive never posted on forums before because I really struggle with imposter syndrome and am super self conscious comparing myself against all the amazing candidates here. However, since Queens makes the application process extra difficult by not posting any statistics/criteria I thought I would contribute in case it could help someone. I also just wanted to say that I have a few friends that didn’t get any interviews for 2 years in a row and then managed to gain admission to multiple medical schools in their 3rd attempt. A lot of these admission processes can be quite flawed and may take students that may not make the best doctors while missing out on those that would. Even this year I know of someone who received an interview invite who not only failed a class due to a breach of academic integrity but also obtained a few publications in their name because their uncle was a surgeon. I’ve personally found it difficult to reconcile feeling like I’m not good enough in the face of knowing of cases like this. At the end of the day though what keeps me going is that (hopefully) hard work will pay off and things will work out for the best. I hope we can all take invites and rejections with a grain of salt, and continue to be kind to ourselves during this process. Wish you all the best :)
  3. 9 points
    No one can deny you the right to feel angry about the decision, however, I can assure you taking a legal route is not going to end positively. The policies are not meant to be transparent. Given that you also applied to American schools, you should know that there is a lot of ambiguity in the process, even more so there. Ontario is known to have some of the highest competition to enter medicine. While ~45-50% of people who apply to American medical schools will succeed in being granted admission (as per AAMC statistics), Ontario schools admit less than 10% of the applicant pool. When you apply, you are mixed with thousands of applicants of whom many will also possess amazing credentials. How do you sort out those thousands of applicants? Subjectivity. We all know by now that GPA and MCAT alone are not the sole indicators of how one will perform as a doctor, which is why all the medical schools have transitioned away from using those as the sole criteria (and in this year's instance, UWO was the last of the Ontario schools to reform their admissions criteria). Something about the aABS of the applicants they chose to interview resonated with the assessors. This ambiguity in the process carries forward even at the interview stage. You are correct, there are a lot of 'deserving students'. All premeds sacrifice a tremendous amount of their lives to apply to medical school. The unfortunate reality is that there are not enough positions for everyone.
  4. 8 points
    You are right on the limited spots, and the impact. I have been around here for awhile and this isn't the first time I have seen these sort of radical change by a school and the impact on the applicant pool. Anger is a predictable response and while it isn't logical I can understand why. People that work so hard under a set of assumptions are then hit over the head when after achieving much have the goal posts moved. People could have sacrificed ECs for years to get a high GPA and MCAT score for Western and now find out that doing that was wasting their time. Further they have gotten that high GPA every year and then find out they are beaten out by some one with way more ECs at the expense of their GPA, and in fact could have terrible GPA years but hit the 2 years under new rules. The objective nature of the old system for many is an oasis in the other relatively subjective, "what do you what??", approach of some other schools. The calming effect if you also happened to be SWOMEN is also diminished. Whole new world in effect - and you can see a lot of people with high MCAT/GPA scores here blocked when they thought they were a sure thing for an interview. Same thing happened when Mac changed radically its polices, Ottawa dropped the Masters route, Queens did adjustments and went dark with some of its rules ... Come to think of the only school that hasn't changed is Toronto and NOSM. At least of all the things you can change about your applicants ECs are relatively simple. There well be a lot of analysis and search for some idea of their criteria, and people will pick up the pieces and move on from there. But for now its going to hurt.
  5. 6 points
    It’s easy to get discouraged after putting together an application and not getting an invitation to interview. I have been there twice- this is the third time and finally got one. The average student has to do 2 or 3 attempts before getting accepted. So view pre-interview rejection as a necessary step towards becoming a doctor. 2 or 3 application cycles is the average, meaning half of applicants take longer. With every application cycle, you learn something that improves your application and strategy. It is not wasted! There is no embarrassment in pursuing your dreams. Your verifiers and friends don’t actually care that you are taking a couple years-it shows persistence. Now, a note to those with lower GPAs and MCAT scores… it’s easy to get discouraged when you see most everybody here has 3.8+ and 510+. Guess what, I didn’t have either of those. You can always retake the MCAT- if you have met the minimum to apply before and it feels too daunting to study for the whole thing again, pick one or two sections (CARS, PSYCH/SOC, etc) and bring up your scores in those two sections. You can do it in 2 months, boom, pow, done. If you have a lower GPA, the good news is that U of A seems to be moving away from having it count as much each year. If you have a high GPA, good on you, you’ve already proven to yourself you can do hard things. The best news of all… extra-curricular activities seemingly count for more and more. You don’t have to be smart- you just have to be dedicated and passionate which most everybody can do if they are willing to find what interests them. Based on my application and how far below average my GPA and MCAT scores both seem to be compared to previous years, I would guess EC’s combined with CASPer and references make up at least 50%+ of pre-interview score now. You don’t have to be an academic genius-just a genius at finding activities you love. The secret for me to get to an interview was being VERY diverse in what you pursue outside of school. Do something unusual-unrelated to medicine. Show them you have a life and can make it in life without being a doctor and could be successful in another field. Show them you can contribute. Show them your understanding about issues of inequalities in society and how you are working to help others. Show them you believe in investing in yourself- it’s not all about other people. Develop a talent and then go as far as you can with it. Start today by picking something out. Last of all... don’t compare yourself to others!!!! It’s so toxic. You have certain strengths and shouldn’t expect yours to exactly match those of others. The more different your application is from your friends, generally the better. When the admissions committee sorts through thousands of applications, I would guess they get bored- I would. Make yours so unusual they want to meet you as a person-not just as an applicant. Be interesting. If you want to join that hot dog eating contest and go for the national record-do it! Keep your head up and good luck munchkins.
  6. 6 points
    The reality is that there is a limited number of spots and not everyone who 'deserves' a spot can receive one. The system can really feel like a lottery. That being said, it might be worth doing some serious self-reflection if you're upset enough to be threatening legal action despite receiving calls from other schools.
  7. 6 points
    good luck tomorrow everybody!
  8. 6 points
    TIME STAMP: 10:46 Result: Invite cGPA: 3.87; MCAT: No Feeling about Casper: Didn't feel too good about it, but gave my most honest answers ECs: Highlight: 2 publications which one as first author during my undergrad. FRQS, CIHR and Faculty scholarships. A lot executive roles in 3 different non profit organisations . Kickboxing amateur and others. PM me if interested. Year: finishing my M.Sc in physiology this summer. IP/OOP/International: IP Letter of EC: yes for one semester Comments (Optional): With my grades in Cegep and a 2.98 during my first undergrad year, a lot of people told me I would never make it and to think about changing career. I had a specific goal and I worked very hard to improve myself academically and also a lot personally. There is a light at the end of the tunnel and don't expect others to see it for you. And remember "there is no shortcut to anywhere worth going" .
  9. 6 points
    TIME STAMP: 1015 Result: Invite!!!! wGPA: 4.00 MCAT: Not submitted ECs: first author on 3 journal paper and first author and presenter on around 19 abstracts, volunteer in africa, cancer centre volunteer, research group mentor and manager, and athletics, VP of a school club, etc. Year: 1st undergraduate degree (2015): cGPA 2.2, second degree (2018): cGPA : 4.0 Currently finishing MSc. IP/OOP/International: IP Letter of EC: No
  10. 6 points
    Edict

    Why do people want this so bad ?

    I think theres a lot of doubts in every profession. I sometimes browse other professional forums and see career switchers all the time. One of the reasons you see a lot of dissatisfied people in medicine is because its a career that requires so much sacrifice in the beginning and the rewards don't really come until later, so if there are any people who are dissatisfied, they find it very challenging to switch, which means the only way to vent is to be somewhat dissatisfied. Additionally, with medicine, your skill set is not easily transferable to other professions. In other fields, the rewards come as you go, and people who are dissatisfied are unlikely to advance in these careers, so people make career move switches with ease. Medicine requires a leap of faith, you essentially need to commit to it before you have even experienced it. Most people don't really experience the grind until mid residency. I think everyone goes through something of a initial grind phase in premed, which you are usually passionate enough to get through, a honeymoon period when you enter medical school, a gradual settling back to reality in clerkship a smaller bump in first year of residency then a gradual decline until one becomes staff. Then it varies, the grind continues in academics, whereas in community most people settle into some sort of grove, but generally people are happier as staff. Personally, i try to keep my expectations lower, ultimately, its a job like any other and its important to keep reminding yourself that. As far as most careers are concerned, medicine is really a top job.
  11. 6 points
    MEDusa

    Interview dates

    This thread is annoying, but I can't help opening it...
  12. 6 points
    shrekfiona12

    Interview dates

    *keeps refreshing Minerva instead of focusing on school work*
  13. 5 points
    Rejected IP Best 2 year GPA- 3.96 cGPA- 3.94 MCAT - 132/130/132/130 - 524 Cant believe it how this process works. Had good ECs and ABS. Got called from IVY schools, USA. I think there is a loophole in the system. The policies are not transparent. If anyone very well deserving is looking into taking a legal route, do reply to me. Im in. I would like to know where i went wrong. I am sure there are a lot of deserving students who think the same way.
  14. 5 points
    Result: Invite Time Stamp: 9:20 am Interview Date: wGPA/cGPA: 3.79/3.36 Year: Final year PhD, MSc completed MCAT: 514 (128/128/129/129) ECs: Very research heavy- 9 pubs (five 1st author), over 300k in grants and scholarships, some major media appearances and lots of knowledge translation work, very unique clinical research with an international collaboration, lots of TAing. Non-research based awards for my sport (varsity and international for more than 12 years) and teaching. A lot of employment in customer service roles, not much volunteering. I know my LORs were very strong. Geography: IP I was rejected everywhere when I applied in my masters and I never ever thought I'd receive an invite. Very grateful 6 years later, and after rewriting the MCAT!
  15. 5 points
    After the crushing blow of UBC interview rejection in December I am really glad to say I have an invite. Sorry to all those who received regrets today Result: Invite!! Time Stamp: 9:20am EST Interview Date: --- TBA wGPA/cGPA: wGPA 3.96-3.97 Year: BSc granted MCAT: 511 (127 CARS, evenly weighted) ECs: lots... medic, music, sports, research, presentations, co-authorship, etc. Geography: OOP
  16. 5 points
    Lol this is kind of sexist towards men and imo a little disturbing that some physicians think that way. I completely understand empathy is important in medicine but I think it is much more important for a physician to be clinically competent and advance the medical field than being empathetic. No amount of fuzziness and empathy will cure bacterial infections and cancer patients. Plus we need people who are empathetic in medical school but we also need people who took challenging courses in undergrad and want to make new medical advances (whether this person is a man or woman is completely irrelevant)
  17. 5 points
    Everyone typing here is a medical student or a pre-med, so we're all naturally going to be nudged towards the physician's POV. But I think it's important to set aside our biases and consider other perspectives as well. In this case the physician got romantically involved with a patient, after some time abandoned the patient to become involved with a colleague, AND refused to further treat the patient. It isn't a stretch to say that this is emotionally manipulative behaviour, so I don't particularly have a problem with the language used in the hearing summary. And I'm not entirely convinced that a patient recently diagnosed with cancer can give consent to the physician overseeing their treatment, so I also have a problem with your characterization of the relationship. Overall we need to stop giving the benefit of the doubt to the physician here because she has displayed a remarkable lack of judgement and frankly reckless behaviour.
  18. 5 points
    I mean yes, it's sad that someone who invested that much time and effort into their training to become an oncologist is now no longer able to practice, but also don't date your patients. It's something that is communicated to us quite clearly on a routine basis. While I have no interest in observing the downfall of a colleague, it is reassuring to see that she didn't get a free pass.
  19. 5 points
    I read the news coverage of what happened and definitely felt like she had crossed a boundary, but then I read the hearing summary on CPSO and feel awful for her. It was two consenting adults (seems like his family had at least some awareness of them having a relationship that was more than doctor-patient) and he didn't object and wasn't coerced into the relationship, both physical and emotional, with her. In his own words, he was most affected by her ending their relationship, not in her having started or during the course of the relationship itself. He didn't complain when she was initiating the relationship, and he didn't complain as it progressed and became more sexual. Sounds a lot like a scorned ex trying to get back where it hurts her the most. Based on his own words to the College, I wonder if he ever would have brought up this complaint to the College if she hadn't ended their relationship. Long story short, never date patients, current and past. (Definitely further limits the pool for those of us entering med single... ugh LOL)
  20. 5 points
    Butterfly_

    Why do people want this so bad ?

    There are always pros and cons to any career. Everyone has different preferences, priorities, and aspirations. Value and worth, these concepts can only be answered by the person themselves. What may be worth millions to one person might be worth nothing to another. Medicine isn't the only profession where people can strive for years and years without fruition. Many entrepreneurs in business work decades until they have a successful product to market. Lawyers can take years to become a partner in a well-known firm. Accountants take numerous exams and years of auditing to become chartered professionals. Other careers are just as difficult and can take just as much sacrifice. Personally, I think having the ability to practice medicine is a privilege and honor. Not many careers have the opportunity to care, heal, and relieve suffering. To me, it is a dream worth sacrificing for. And being in medical school now, everyday I feel so grateful to be here. Compared to my previous career, I feel so much happier, excited, and motivated. Having spoken to quite a few docs myself, I find that there is dichotomy of views --some love their jobs, some hate it. For the ones that hate it, perhaps this has to do with pursuing medicine for the wrong reasons, or that they haven't had the opportunity to pursue any other career prior to entering medicine, or maybe its burn out. I'm not sure. But for the ones that love it, it's more than just a job or a career. It's a calling. I had a tutor that told me once, "I have been practicing medicine for almost 50 years. I can't think of anything else more fulfilling and rewarding. If I could go back in time and do it all over again, I would in a heartbeat."
  21. 5 points
  22. 4 points
    For what it's worth, those of us who were waitlisted for interviews but eventually got one last cycle actually received the same rejection email as everyone else on Jan 31, and then we were eventually surprised by emails/phone calls letting us know that we were on the waitlist and a spot had opened up, in the weeks that followed. No idea if they've changed how they're doing it for this year, though. I went from getting a rejection email to getting an interview off the waitlist to being accepted, though, so it definitely is possible.
  23. 4 points
    Read the attachment below. I have to agree that this is an open and shut case. It doesn't matter if she is the nicest person in the world or whether she was highly qualified as an oncologist, she ultimately crossed many boundaries and knew what she was getting herself into. She initiated this relationship the day after she diagnosed him with cancer when he was likely very vulnerable and continued to have a relationship with him while she provided treatments. She even had sexual relations with him while he was an inpatient and made him change charts to cover for her. I feel bad for her, but at the same time, this situation is undeniably wrong and she knew there would be repercussions. It's unfortunate that she won't be able to practice anymore but hopefully, this will be a lesson for others not to make the same mistake. https://www.cpso.on.ca/DoctorDetails/Theepa-Sundaralingam/0252171-89581
  24. 4 points
    Ahhh exciting! I hope I get to see many of you on the week of Feb 19!!!
  25. 4 points
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