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  1. 7 points
    Sorry, but how badly you want something has very little correlation with whether or not you "deserve" it over any other applicant and certainly not whether you'll be any good at it. Many people dream about becoming famous actors or singers, too, and they are constantly beaten out by the millions of others who share the same dream as well as those who were just sort of given the opportunity. Barring nepotism/unfair advantages, it's neither fair nor unfair, it's just the way it is. Sad, fine, but it's foolish to suggest that you need to be bouncing up and down at the thought of practicing medicine to be any more qualified to be a good doctor than someone who sees it as simply a job. You wouldn't trust an engineer who is building a bridge that will support dozens of cars over a river because he sees his job as simply a job? I don't care whether or not he's passionate about calculating the load a bridge can take. I care that he's able to effectively do his job. I know plenty of people I spent undergrad with who wanted nothing more than to be doctors who would be downright awful at it, either because they're not very good at being empathetic, or because they simply weren't very good at science. It is sad that they can't fulfill their dreams, yes, but I'd rather have a doctor who had the academic rigour necessary to properly diagnose me than someone who was admitted simply because they are "so intensely passionate about helping others and practicing medicine." If it comes down to two people at the top of the interview list, then yes, it's a coin flip, but there's a 99% chance they're equally capable and deserving regardless of their differing passion. From personal anecdotes as well as dozens of hours reading into this, doctors who hate coming to work are usually those who are trapped by debt (not an enormous problem after a couple of years of practice in Canada), those in inhumanely demanding residencies or specialities that I personally will never go near, and those who went into it thinking it was their predestined magical fate and get slapped by the harsh bureaucratic and futile reality of medicine (hint: it's not all that great, no matter how much ~passion~ you have). Anyways, I'm not sure why the idea of "coasting" aggravates you? I prefaced that several times in my previous posts by saying it's still a LOT of hard work. There's still an enormous volume of material to learn and getting a 70% means you know the majority of it. Just because I'm not going to subscribe to the ridiculous notion that my entire life needs to be living and breathing medicine and studying at every second or doing observerships or research or extra readings or extra time in the clinic et cetera doesn't mean I'm going to make a bad doctor. I don't need that stuff for the job I want to do, so why do it? That's exactly the kind of awful rhetoric that lead to the foolish idea that we need to be martyrs for our patients and for the art of medicine. The same ideals and notions that hospital admins (who love the incredibly cheap resident labour) and attendings (who went through the same thing and are bitter and want to dish it out on the next generation) perpetuate that lead to the inhumane residencies, the 80 hour work weeks, the day after day of 24-hour call with no sleep, the extremely high burnout, depression, job dissatisfaction, and suicide. Almost every other field has invariably better work-life balance- why can't we? I have a life outside of medicine and I enjoy it very much and you're damn right I'm not going to spend one second longer than I need to learning to be a good doctor. If that aggravates you, then I really don't care, and you're exactly part of the problem I dreaded when I thought about a career in medicine. Medicine is a job. For some it's a passion, for others a calling, but at the end of the day, it's a job. A stable, high paying one that requires a lot of training, intelligence, and discipline. There's ample time to kick out bad seeds, either during the extremely competitive admissions process, during medical school, residency... *especially* in today's hypercompetitive system. If you're in an MD program, and especially if you successfully complete residency, it means you more likely than not have the skills and character required to be a good doctor. I highly doubt anyone who would genuinely make a bad doctor could brute force their way through premed, volunteering/ECs, the MCAT, applications, ethics tests, interviews, med school, and residency. But if you think everybody in medicine is just teeming with constant uncontainable passion and excitement, you're sorely mistaken and living in quite an idyllic world.
  2. 6 points
    Lord Serotonin

    Info admission - automne 2021

    Salut! Juste confirmer aux nouveaux admis dans les universités qui veulent faire une demande à l'UdeM. Vous allez compter dans la catégorie collégien et c'est confirmé. Voici comment l'UdeM a définit les candidats universitaires (ils l'ont changé pour le rendre plus clair): '' toute personne titulaire d'un DEC ou d'un diplôme équivalent et qui a suivi au moins 12 crédits universitaires avant le trimestre d'automne précédant l'année d'admission visée. " (avant ils disaient "en date de limite d'admission", maintenant c'est avant le trimestre d'automne précédant) L'année d'admission visée est 2021. Le trimestre d'automne précédant 2021 c'est l'automne 2020 (maintenant). Donc, il faut avoir suivi (passé) 12 crédits universitaires avant l'automne 2020 pour être un candidat universitaire. Donc, vous allez être dans la catégorie collégienne, ce qui veut aussi dire que l'automne 2020 ne comptera pas pour vos admissions, biensûr. Ça c'est une bonne nouvelle pour les candidats universitaires car vous n'allez pas avoir de compétition de plus (donc pour la majorité ça va être les mêmes candidats que 2020 moins les admis de cette année). C'est aussi bon pour les étudiants collégiens qui veulent se re-essayer en médecine avant d'être forcé de finir un bac. Et pour ceux qui viennent de graduer du cégep avec une cote R un peu faible, restez fort(e), votre temps va venir! Pour les universitaires: on attend toujours la réponse du SAR pour savoir si l'automne 2020 va compter pour nous. Donc, si jamais vous recevez une réponse confirmée, laissez nous savoir dans ce thread, c'est fait pour ça.
  3. 6 points
    Lord Serotonin

    Info admission - automne 2021

    *Nouvelles* J'ai contacté la TGDE de pharmacie (Sophie Dallacasa). Je lui ai envoyé exactement le même courriel que j'ai envoyé pour dentaire (sauf que j'ai écris "pharmacie" of course). Sa réponse: << Le 15 novembre vous n'aurez pas vos notes de l'automne. >>
  4. 6 points
    Lord Serotonin

    Info admission - automne 2021

    *Nouvelles* Une amie a contacté la TGDE de médecine est on lui a dit qu'elle pouvait faire une demande pour médecine si elle est présentement dans sa première session d'université parce que la session d'automne 2020 ne compte pas (autant qu'elle n'a pas complété 12 crédits universitaires avant cette automne, elle sera collégienne). J'ai contacté la TGDE de médecine dentaire (Lynn Désinat). Je lui ai demandé: "Je comptes faire une demande d'admission en médecine dentaire. Je vais être un candidat universitaire parce que j'ai complété plus de 12 crédits universitaires depuis l'automne 2019. Je voudrais savoir, est-ce que la session d'automne 2020 va compter dans ma CRU pour l'admission 2021 même si la nouvelle date limite des demandes c'est le 15 novembre?" et elle m'a répondu:"Si les résultats de l’automne 2020 sont disponibles au 15 novembre 2020, ils seront considérés." Donc à date j'ai 2 TGDE qui pointent au fait que l'automne 2020 ne comptera pas. J'ai aussi contacté les TGDE d'optométrie et de pharmacie. Je vais vous laisser savoir ce qu'ils disent!
  5. 6 points
    PHAMV10

    Info admission - automne 2021

    J'ai appelé l'admission il y a de cela à peu près une semaine et le monsieur qui m'a répondu m'a clairement affirmer hors de tout doute que la session d'automne 2020 ne comptera pas dans une admission pour des doctorats de premier cycle. Après pour être franc, Udem est plus instable que le gars dans Split donc je serait entièrement convaincu que quand ils le publieront sur leur site.
  6. 5 points
    thank you for making this thread. i honestly relate to it so much. just a quick note- there is a difference between wanting something and earning it and those who earn it should feel no guilt over reaching that goal over those who "want" it more
  7. 5 points
    Med school, Y1. I'm in the exact same boat as you, OP, and I've posted about this a lot on other forums. I've done a ton of research on this subject and to be frank, I didn't really want to do go to med school because I do not have this "burning passion" everyone says you need to have (and what the hell everyone claims to be so excited about in medicine, I'll never truly understand). My passions lie in other fields, a lot of them creative (read: no money, no job prospects, do what you love but be broke forever), some of them more suited to a sustainable and stable lifestyle (computer science, webdev, data science). However, med school itself is literally a lottery win here in Canada. Consider the amount of people who apply and how little people actually get in. There's a reason for this. The career is a ticket to an extremely stable job *anywhere* in Canada (I'd wager you could probably find a job almost anywhere in the world). Not only that, but you're getting remunerated a substantial amount of money (which is fair given what it takes to even begin practicing). If you have even a modicum of interest in the material and won't hate the job to the point where you harm your patients or yourself, I think it's worth it. If you have the intelligence and required character traits and have already put in the work to be admitted (a very high GPA, stellar ECs/volunteerism, the MCAT, etc.), it's hard to turn down- at least it was for me, anyways. For instance, consider that med in Canada is pass/fail. As long as you have some natural ability to retain information easily (i.e., most successful admits), you don't need to kill yourself studying to just pass (it's been ~4 weeks and I've been doing fine with like, 10 hours a week). You don't need to spend hours doing research and ECs to make yourself competitive for a specialty where, after 5 years, you'll have to spend another 2 in fellowship to *then* get a job. You can "coast" (I mean, it'll still be hard work, especially around exam times and during clerkship) and finish in 6 years with a job anywhere you want helping people, which in of itself is quite rewarding. Also consider that the debt we take on is significantly lower than in the US, which makes this a financially sound choice- I certainly wouldn't be doing this if I wasn't in Canada (also, family physicians are paid much more here than in the states). And once you're there, immediately switch over to part-time work, work for 2-3 days a week, make higher than the average Canadian household income, and have the rest of the week for your passions/interests. Or be a hospitalist and work 7 days on, 7 days off and have every other week off for what makes you happier than medicine. Or do emergency med and work what turns out to be 6 months out of the year and still make more than any other full time job. Or open your own clinic and take on 12 hour days if you want and then go to the hospital afterwards to round if that's your thing. The amount of flexibility is unprecedented. Yes, you can begin making a salary that rivals a physicians' take-home (after billing, overhead, taxes) in data science or finance or whatever, but you'll still probably be working 50-60 hours a week until the day you retire. Look, I don't think you will ever get through a surgical residency or even an internal medicine residency (80 hour work weeks on top of studying on top of 4 day 24hr call = no free time, no social life, no sleep...for 5 years) without some underlying passion- the people who *do* have the passion almost all burn out and become husks of themselves those 3-7+ years. I already know that's not the life I want or desire, I don't care how interesting I think one particular body system is. Re: residency. I've heard mixed things about family med residencies. One thing I will say for sure is that the vast majority of the programs are less intense than your average specialty. I believe the fam med with a +1 in emergency med is actually quite stressful and in its own boat. Other +1s or more prestigious family med programs might be similar in that regard. If you're rural, you might have a lot more hours simply because they just need the manpower (just like a family doc in a rural setting works 60+ hours a week because who else is gonna serve the entire community?). And finally, don't forget it's two years compared to the 3-7+ in other specialties. I can take 80 hour work weeks on no sleep for two years, but 5? Forget it. Re: being a good doctor- you still need to know enough to pass, which means you need to understand and critically apply the information to achieve at least a 70% grade. A lot of what we learn in med school becomes completely irrelevant for the specialty you choose. You'll know enough to be a good doctor so long as you have all the other necessary traits- compassion, empathy, the ability to refresh on material and learn new material over the years, etc. Again, if you have no "passion" to the point where you're going to be a bad doctor (rude to your patients, harming them, etc.) and miserable all day, then no, don't do it. Anyways, PM me if you want to talk more. I completely empathize with your position, and I know more than anyone there's an enormous shortage of people in our field who share the same worries (at least premeds and pre-M3s; more join our boat when they realize medicine isn't really their ~dream come true~).
  8. 4 points
    It’s kind of sad when there’s so many people who dream to be doctors only to get their spot beaten by someone who thinks of it as purely a job. Lack of passion can easily lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout.l. I’ve seen some really burnout doctors and they hate coming to work. Getting stuck working or learning from them is freaking horrible , for everyone—patients, nurses, medical admin, learners, colleagues etc. Also the concept of “coasting” through medicine is just freaking aggravating. It’s this kind of attitude that creates shitty doctors. furthermore, don’t underestimate the difficulties of family medicine. It’s an amazing specialty that requires ALOT of work and relationship building. So please do something else and leave the spot to someone who is passionate.
  9. 4 points
    Do FM 100% Do you want to chill in medical school with little stress not having to worry about any research/EC/etc, have the freedom to nearly guarantee where you do residency, do a chill 2 years of residency, get a job anywhere in Canada on the spot, not worry about doing graduate degrees/fellowships, have the freedom to explore many niches in family medicine, have a great work life balance, not spend gruelling years in residency, have the chance to get into many +1's if you want to (EM, Anes, Derm, etc), have a much more chill board exam, know you are actually making a difference to the number of Canadians who need a FM doc, and on top of that if you work hard are business minded and know what you are doing surpass the income of many specialists? If the answer is yes -> do FM. If you like stressing in medical school and scrambling for any research/resume padding you can get for CaRMS, and then further trying to impress in many years of residency/fellowship to get a job, and you like the feeling of having to likely settle for location where you do your residency since spots are more competitive, have to do 6-8+ years of residency (since you need to do a fellowship(s)/graduate degree(s) for nearly all FRCPC specialities, have to settle for living in places you really don't want to be just to get a job, like being limited to a particular body system/type of work, have a much worse work life balance (for most FRCPC specialities), like spending gruelling years in residency and fellowship while your FM friends are living life and making money, spend at least a year of life studying nonstop for the difficult FRCPC exam, and on top of that not only lose out on years of income while you are a resident? If the answer is yes -> do a speciality Many smart people in medicine recognize the above, which is why FM is getting more popular recently 43% of all graduating Canadian medical students in 2020 ended up in FM in the end after both rounds whether it was their first choice or not. (>50% of graduating medical students from the 3 French schools, 55% of Queen's grads, and 64% of NOSM's grads in particular went into FM for example) I'm not going to lie, I feel a lot of people are ego/prestige driven and "look-down on FM" which is sad that someone would discount all the pros of FM and cons of specialities just to be called a say "interventional cardiologist" even though they have to do 9 years of very hard residency and after that be left scrambling to get a job anywhere. Before anyone says this, I know there are people who value passion and interest for the field fist and foremost and I highly respect them, but no one can deny that at least part of why many people discount FM is because they perceive it as less "prestigious" than FRCPC. Everyone has different priorities but what I assume is true for many people is: work-life balance, lifestyle, training time, jobs, residency lifestyle, etc > passion for the field, "prestige of the field"
  10. 3 points
    offmychestplease

    Is a 3.83 enough (IP)

    I wish you didn't foul out at the end of the 4th when we needed you ):
  11. 3 points
    I always find discussions of "passion" interesting. The reality is that, in my experience working in different settings, many people do not find a job (let alone a career) which they can say fits their "passions". Many in my undergrad cohort are struggling with this as the realities of finding a job, any job, conflicts with the advice they've heard to "find their passion". Ultimately life doesn't owe you anything, let alone a job that "suits your passions". I dont think there's anything wrong with recognizing that your work, even in a professional field, doesn't need to be your passion. The whole idea is very individualistic to me. A large part of why I jumped through the hoops to get in was for others, not some idealized future patients, but my current (and hopefully future) family, and I can't be alone in this. They didn't push or pull, but that security and stability of (many types of) Medicine is something else, and I see nothing wrong with recognizing this and how that provides a fantastic career when all around me I see people struggling with unemployment, dead end jobs, and the like. When i think of the sacrifices my grandparents and parents made I find it hard to make life decisions solely focused on "my passions". You can argue that professional fields are different, but how different? How many lawyers have a passion for transactional litigation? How many accountants love doing audits? Im sure there are some, but many people do view their professions as something interesting, but not as their primary "passion". Anecdotal, I know, but of the half dozen accountants I know all have a major hobby that consumes off time. I think part of this is (limited) survivorship guilt. Getting in is so tough that you cant help but look around at the people you know who didnt make it and feel a little strange being one of those that "made it". I feel somewhat similar to whatdoido when I look around. I have friends who have built their life around getting into medicine, for nothing as of yet. On the flip side I never did anything that "forced me" into that groove (no Health Sci degree/no MPH/none of my ECs and jobs are directly health related) and yet here I am, a first cycle admit MS1 when I know there are people going into round 3+ with no luck. Its hard not to feel a little strange about that. In a way I can understand some of the bitterness I see towards the first cycle medical students. When you're surrounded by people who mumble the social determinants of health in their sleep and seem hyper focused it does feel strange to have crossed the line while dabbling in other areas and not demonstrating a narrow focus. Perhaps that's a good thing though in the end, time will tell.
  12. 3 points
    IMislove

    Making decisions about specialty..

    Probably one of the silliest things I’ve heard. Everyone has their story, 50% of those may very well be privileged people (like my class), it’s hilarious how unrelatable most med students are to the common Canadian. You may not agree with off my chest, but I’ll be damned before someone calls someone else out after multiple tries to medicine. Also your point makes 0 sense, they are not at all related. Use actually well formed arguments and not personal attacks thanks.
  13. 3 points
    Mr. A

    Info admission - automne 2021

    Guys j’avais contacté les admissions à propos de ça et ils avaient dit qu’ils vont revenir là dessus quand ils auront décidé! Ils m’ont répondu maintenant voici leur réponse: Nous vous recontactons suite à votre question concernant les résultats d'automne 2020. Ces derniers ne seront pas pris en compte dans l'évaluation de la candidature pour l'automne 2021, si les cours ont été suivis à l'université.
  14. 3 points
    robclem21

    Making decisions about specialty..

    While, I get that you are passionate about family medicine, and I agree, its a great speciality for many reasons, I feel you are painting a bit of an unfair picture of most specialties and grouping many into a single category when thats not in fact the reality. Despite the positive elements of FM that you presented here, I personally would not find any job satisfaction in doing that day to day. Even with a good lifestyle and work-life balance (which some might argue is even better in some specialities), it is important to be happy with the work you do day to do and not just get by because its an easier path. More than half of graduates still pursue a field that is not family medicine, and majority of those do not do so for the "prestige" or "income potential". Feeling the need to impress tends to subside with time, and while the path to practice is certainly longer for other specialties, it's important to ultimately do something you are happy doing. If that is FM then great, but if not, it's important to know that it's not all bad as presented above. I am in a 5-year speciality that likely wont REQUIRE a fellowship for a job down the road, and I can say I don't feel limited to ANY of what the response above has mentioned (limited to one body system, working in a place I don't want to, bad work-life balance, need to impress attendings, scrambling for research, etc.) Important to have a balanced opinion when making a decision.
  15. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Salut! Je me demandais il y a combien de personnes inscrites aux cours en ce moment? Merci!:)
  16. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Salut! Est-ce que quelqu'un aurait une idée quand la LA sera a nouveau mise à jour?
  17. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Salut tout le monde! Je me demandais si, étant 11eme dans la LA collegienne, j'avais encore des chances de rentrer
  18. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Salut! Je me demandais, pour ceux étant déjà en pharmacie, si c'était facile ou faisable d'avoir de bonnes notes dans le programme, par exemple, avoir une moyenne de A- ? Si oui, vous aviez combien de CRC, si ce n'est pas trop indiscret? Merci beaucoup pour les réponses !:)
  19. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    pharmD

    Salut! Je me demandais, pour ceux étant déjà en pharmacie, si c'était facile ou faisable d'avoir de bonnes notes dans le programme, par exemple, avoir une moyenne de A- ? Si oui, vous aviez combien de CRC, si ce n'est pas trop indiscret? Merci beaucoup pour les réponses !:)
  20. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Ha ok! Non, ca n'a pas encore bougé. Je pense que ça risque plus d'être mis à jour jeudi ou vendredi comme les autres fois
  21. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Tu étais combien sur la LA collégienne pour savoir? Peit être que ce délais est dû en raison du temps pour faire les nouvelles offres aux prochains sur les LA, mais j'ai bien hate de voir la prochaine mise à jour:)
  22. 3 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Non, rien à changé pour ce qui est de mon rang!
  23. 2 points
    My post history tells me otherwise, but the last time I personally remember posting on pm101 was after I'd failed a final exam, sobbing at my school's library. But I'm back and I've learned so much since that December of 2016 (I think that post was under a different name). It was super rough and demotivating at times, but it's also been four years of learning, meeting amazing people, and opportunities I never would've even dreamed of back when I started my UG degree. These are my annual GPAs (not cumulative): 1st year GPA: 1.7 (not full courseload) 2nd: 3.0 (not full courseload) 3rd: 3.75 (full courseload) 4th: 4.0 (full courseload) 5th: ? (full courseload) And now I'm in my fifth year, hoping to end again with a 4.0. You can probably tell from my GPA, but my chances at schools like UofT are shot due to my abysmal courseloads in first/second year, as well as a low cGPA (I think I'm sitting at around a ~3.22). Right now I'm looking at UBC (BC resident, I have around an 81% avg), Queens, Western, and Mac. I know that my chances are extremely, extremely slim, but I still want to try applying. There are two main things I'm concerned about. 1. I have yet to take the MCATs. One of the reasons for this is because while I'll graduate with a BSc, my majors were in anthro and history. I've learned a lot about bones (especially biomechanics) and genes (molecular anthro), but I've also admittedly had very little exposure in biochem outside of what I learned in mol.anthro, physics, and even ochem. While I've had friends majoring in BA anthro and theatre tell me that they did well on the MCATs 515+ by taking prep courses (both took Princeton), I haven't been feeling very confident even though they had much less of a science background than me. I tried to self-study this past summer and it just didn't work. I got hyperfocused on the smallest details which meant going through everything took forever, and by the time summer ended I hadn't even made it halfway through most of my Kaplan books except CARS. I'd be down to take any studying suggestions, especially from arts students who were successful in getting a good score. I think in the back of my mind, I always tell myself that there's no doctor who's bad at the sciences, so I need to make sure I get 100% on every tiny thing so I won't fall behind my peers. 2. I have depth in my ECs, but not breadth. I've been extremely involved in 2 clubs throughout my undergrad, and I've been an exec on both for the last four (and now five) years. One of them involves student accessibility and I have two awards to show for it, while the other has also been doing great work over the last few years, though there's yet to be an award. I've also self-published a book on Amazon, mostly just for my own sake (and to cringe at my writing). As for research and publications, I've only done 2 student journal publications. I have 2 research courses lined up for this year (Independent Studies for any UofT alumns familiar with it) and 1 paid 'research' that has no publications, just scanning and translating for a prof I've known for years. I think the research that I'll be able to do will be quite interesting to write on apps, but again, no opportunities for pubs. My greatest concern is, what I've listed is basically it. Being president of 2 clubs while writing my novel over the last 4-5 years has been incredibly time consuming, on top of furiously working to maintain my grades so that I don't make the same mistakes as first year. I was supposed to volunteer at a hospital this year for community work (since I have 0 of that outside of school), but that got flushed as soon as COVID hit. I've written a lot on the vaccine hesitancy movement as well as indigenous health/healing throughout my undergrad, but those aren't really ECs and I can't really think of opportunities for me to talk about what I've learned. I'm also worried that because I have no community volunteering outside of school, I won't be able to ask for recommendation letters besides my professors (since clubs are run by students). Also, because I'm graduating before I send in my apps, I'll have a free 'year' to apply, but not have school. I was thinking of spending that time to travel should COVID permit, but I can't think of much else except to get a part-time job. Thanks for reading this block of text and I hope everyone's safe and enjoying their Zoom classes!
  24. 2 points
    Mr. A

    Moyenne Automne 2020

    Parce que lets be honest c'est pas tout le monde qui sont des bons petits bonhommes qui vont être honnête durant leurs evaluations LOL il y en a qui vont tricher... tous les CRUs vont etre fuckée pour le futur lointain à cause des moyennes élevées
  25. 2 points
    mastermucocele

    Snapshot Experiences

    I definitely utilized the sample questions they give you before starting- there’s two. Did both a couple of times to get used to reading the prompt and talking. It is challenging- you have to read the question and think and respond all while the timer is counting down and it’s recording you haha. I reviewed my application and looked up some tips on taking one-way interviews on the internet! None of my questions were situational like the actual CASPer- they were all like personal questions about me as an applicant. Felt more like a job interview- i.e. know your strengths and weaknesses, etc. You’ll be fine though! It’s really not awful, I only took like 30 minutes to do this stuff and prepare beforehand! The worst part is after you’re done and you think of ways you could’ve answered the question better instead of rambling lol
  26. 2 points
    It is just a job but since you spend a lot of time at it (be it via training, studying, and then actually working) you might as well find ways to enjoy it. I am grateful to be doing something that I enjoy doing and getting paid for it. It makes me a lot less miserable to be around. I was lucky that something I was passionate about could be connected with a career in medicine. Thus, I didn't have to be passionate about medicine itself (because I am not) but I am passionate about the word I am so lucky to be able to do and actually be remunerated for it. Believe me...even in my specialty, there were rotations I really wasn't into and there were others that I loved, and others that I thought I'd love and was quite disappointed once I started to do the actual work. Nice thing about medicine is there is almost always a niche for everyone. The difficulty is finding it.
  27. 2 points
    I think it's a little more simple than that. If you hate what you do. It'll be more difficult to do than if you enjoyed the same task. Getting up in the morning is hard enough if you don't wanna go somewhere, I think the same applies here If you're gonna do something for the rest of your life, why not enjoy it. If you don't that's fine too, plenty of people don't. If you do enjoy, that's awesome.
  28. 2 points
    ACHQ

    Last Minute Change in Specialties

    Recent staff GIM grad here and staff at a community hospital. if you don't mind me asking what was the 5 year surgical specialty? Is this something you still want to pursue and did you love it as much as CTU (or more?). Do you like family medicine as much as either of those? What did you love about CTU most? was it the inpatient/ward work? was it the new consultations from the ER (or other areas)? was it the resuscitation's? was it clinics? was it all the above? if you exclusively only enjoyed inpatient ward work then family medicine with extra training in hospitalist medicine is not a bad idea, but doesn't offer the range of work possibilities GIM does (ER consults, urgent GIM clinics, inpatient consults to non-IM services). Given the COVID-19 pandemic (and the fact that we are definitely in the beginning of a 2nd wave) it may be tough to organize, but try to and see if you can get *any* Internal medicine related electives (GIM or sub-specialties). If your heart is truly set on it then at least give it a shot. Even if you can't get an elective you can at least apply and see what happens and delay making a decision right now (or at least have a decision made for you via carms interviews received or not received). I have seen people get interviews with minimal electives (they were using it as a backup), and given the pandemic you can definitely use that to help out your case. The one thing I would consider is if you are applying for a 5 year specialty and get it it would be easier to transfer to Internal medicine (or family medicine) than the other way around (due to funding issues) Good luck!
  29. 2 points
    M1 here; I agree with you completely. I don't subscribe to the notion that my life must revolve around my patients and communities. It's a fantastic career that can be enjoyed without an undying passion for (or obsession with) medicine. God forbid you prioritize your family and kids.
  30. 2 points
    I'm a staff and I will say that I work with many colleagues who are not passionate about medicine and are pretty unhappy. I think if you go into medicine just for the money every day is going to be a drag. I'm not saying you have to dedicate your whole life to medicine (unless you're in certain fields) but I would say you should have something to drive you other than the pay cheque. I honestly think medicine does a poor job of conveying how tiring the training is for most fields. This compounds with the fact that the geographic flexibility isn't there for all fields. I suppose you could do something generalist like FM to keep your options open. I can say I have many classmates who are in FM and live very fulfilling lives outside of medicine and doing great. I will say that on the other end that I have many friends who are always looking for ways out of FM because they don't like the job. I think this is also supported by anecdotal evidence that you see on the physician facebook groups. You will do financially fine as a MD no matter what you choose. However, I always caution to students to stay away if they are just chasing a pay cheque. There's more than one path to happiness and medicine isn't that path for everyone.
  31. 2 points
    What about family med? Just aim to pass in med school, the residency is much, much less grueling than most other specialties, and you can work part time forever and still make well above the average Canadian income. Is the 6-year training that hard if you're aiming to coast?
  32. 2 points
    ouchhhh, that was a low blow... (and this is coming from someone who disagrees with offmychestplease a whole lot)
  33. 2 points
    The best specialty is the specialty that you enjoy imo. You can have a rewarding career as a GP, a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a pathologist etc. I am only a PGY-3 so my view may be a bit naive, but at the end of my 20th hour of my call shift, I want to have a good reason/justification of why I am doing this while I could be at home enjoying life and sleep like most (normal) people. And you know what? Every time I reflect on my journey and my choices, I can’t see myself anywhere else but where I am today, and in my current specialty. I still get excited about going to work when I am on service (despite sometimes brutal hours) and get miserable when I have to go to work on off service rotation where the hours are much more chill and it’s because I love the work I do. So ultimately, don’t worry about the compensation, the job prospect etc. All residency is brutal, doctors will be well compensated, and you will eventually be employed. The career you choose is going to last 30+ years, so find what you enjoy. I work with surgeons and other specialists very closely, and I am sure they are well compensated, have a prestigious reputation etc. But looking at their residency and life, I would never pursue that career... ever. I also know they fee the same way about my specialty. So honestly, pursue what you love.
  34. 2 points
    Salut Je suis présentement en 4e année de pharmacie à Ulaval. Honnêtement, je ne peux pas te parler de la situation à Montréal, mais j'aimerais quand même te parler de la situation ailleurs! De ce que j'ai vu durant mes stages que j'ai fait un peu partout dans les régions de Québec/Gaspésie/Bas-St-Laurent, il manque encore beaucoup de pharmaciens et les pharmaciens récemment gradués que j'ai connus n'ont pas eu de difficulté à trouver un emploi. Au niveau de l'admission, dans mon année en tout cas, environ 25% de la cohorte initiale a quitté le programme jusqu'à date (soit pour aller en med/med dent/autre ou juste parce qu'ils se sont rendu compte que pharmacie n'était pas pour eux). Donc je doute que le nombre d'admis soit trop élevé. Je suis plus ou moins sur de ce que tu veux dire par «carrière», mais la profession de pharmacien évolue constamment et les pharmaciens se sont vu attribués vraiment beaucoup de nouveaux actes et pouvoirs dans les dernières années, ce qui rends la profession vraiment plus intéressante et stimulante (donc le contraire de «en déclin»).
  35. 2 points
    Avoir une job a temps plein a montreal tout de suite après la graduation, c’est rendu plus rare. Beaucoup de pharmaciens qui ont récemment gradué travaillent a temps partiel dans 2-3 pharmacies pour remplir leurs heures. Ce sont souvent des pharmacies en banlieue, donc voiture = nécessaire. C’est tout aussi possible d’avoir une offre de travail à temps plein tout de suite après la graduation dans une pharmacie ou tu travailles/ a fait un stage, c’est juste pas certain. C’est a toi de voir si c’est un deal-breaker! De tous les doctorats de premier cycle, c’est le plus saturé sur le marché du travail et aussi celui avec le salaire le plus bas. Donc si t’aimes vraiment ca, vas-y. Si tu hésite entre pharmacie et un autre doct de 1er cycle, et que le salaire et la facilité de trouver un emploi rapidement après la graduation son super importants pour toi (on vient pas tous de familles riches) je te dirais d’en choisir un autre. - Une étudiante en pharmacie qui adore son programme
  36. 2 points
    M112

    Info admission - automne 2021

    3 years later ...
  37. 2 points
    Psych

    Postdoc/phd hoping to apply to MD school

    Hi! I can't speak to US schools, but unfortunately your undergrad GPA will really hold you back for Canadian schools. Most, if not all, schools in Canada look at undergrad GPA only and don't count grad school grades at all. If you want to be competitive in Canada, you will likely have to do a second undergrad (some accelerated programs allow you to do this in 2-3 years which would make you eligible for some schools such as Queen's that only look at 2 year GPA)
  38. 2 points
  39. 2 points
    Not all of them, but some will definitely be in that scenario style format. Although the topic/level will be adjusted for the first/second year level, so more reasonable than the progress test haha.
  40. 2 points
    Lord Serotonin

    Info admission - automne 2021

    Je suis d'accord. Faut pas oublier qu'il y a BCP de personnes qui amenent leur grosse cote R du cegep (35 ou meme plus) dans la categorie universitaire quand ils appliquent dans leurs premiere annee, donc ces gens ne vont plus etre notre competition pour cette annee! Aussi, il y a des gens qui give up sur leur reve de rentrer dans un doctorat de premier cycle apres 1 an d'uni, soit a cause de la charge de travail ou parce qu'ils pensent qu'ils sont entrain de devenir trop vieux pour recommencer l'universite. Donc, en gros j'imagines ca va aider en masse! Si les CRUs des derniers admis cette annee etaient dans les 34.5, par exemple, ca me surprendrai pas si ca baisse a 34.0 cette annee!
  41. 2 points
    hopefulpremed98

    cdn DAT filled up quickly??

    Ahh yeah my bad I’ll register the day before the registration opens. Thanks for opening my eyes if only I knew
  42. 2 points
    KamehameHaaaaa

    cdn DAT filled up quickly??

    dude tf is wrong with you? fuckkk everyone that thinks or acts like you. Most of y'all a bunch of privileged, antagonizing asssholes.
  43. 2 points
    No matter what happens, If you’re going to be a doctor, you’re going to live a comfortable life. If you want to be rich, do something else.
  44. 2 points
    I feel like I answer this question once a month, haha, it’s a major source of anxiety. Yes, UBC accepts people who don’t take full course loads. Lots of people have had lighter course loads, myself included, who were admitted. They do expect you to demonstrate that you can handle hard work. There is a place on the application where you are asked to speak to why you took a part-time course load - there you can explain that in addition to 4 courses a term, you worked part-time. That’s probably more than sufficient.
  45. 2 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Salut! Pensez vous qu'il va y avoir une mise à jour de la liste d'attente ce vendredi malgré les vacances de la construction ?:)
  46. 2 points
    Jmed1234

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    Salut! Je me demandais, à la suite des offres faites aux collégiens aujourd'hui et hier, la LA collégienne à bougé de combien de places? Merci!:)
  47. 2 points
    Jmed1234

    Admission PharmaD 2020 Ulaval

    Et à quand pensez vous sera la prochaine mise à jour?
  48. 2 points
    Jmed1234

    Admissions MD Laval 2020

    Bonjour! À la suite des offres faites aujourd'hui, est ce que la LA collégienne a beaucoup bougé ?
  49. 1 point
    I chose AB because that is where I am based. It is not too difficult being part of "that 10%" since half of FM doctors work part-time <30 hours/week...and many of the ones that work full-time don't know/don't care to maximize their billings. Even then, the hours needed to get into that top 10% are not comparable to the call and work hours of many surgeons etc. And this is not even taking into account many years of lost-income in residency/fellowship/etc. Your posts indicate that YOU think "the career is boring and unrewarding". That is your opinion. Many others don't think so + found a niche they love to practice.
  50. 1 point
    Back some years ago lecture recordings, textbook and notes would be the best way to study, but with advent of YouTube things have been flipped upside down. One thing you realize quickly is most lecturers suck, they can't explain things well, or the way they explain things is fragmented, illogical. So more and more I advocate people using online resources that actually explain things logically. Previous poster mentioned Osmosis, it's a GREAT resource that make exceptional videos, which explain concepts very clearly and concisely, highlighting high yield topics. You can even use it to study some Royal College exam topics, that's how good they are. Not to mention there are now numerous videos showing you physical exam maneuvers. Multi-media is the key to remembering key info, you should read about it, talk about it, look at it, and hear about it, or even do it with your own hands, then you'll retain it. Another dubious distinction of med school lecture is they never tell you what's high yield on the exam and in practice. For exam purposes what's high yield can be found in USMLE First Aid book. That book is very dense but all the topics they mention in there have been distilled by generations of med students. Use that book to filter out things you must know, things you should know, and things that are nice to know, they supplement with YouTube, Wikipedia, medscape or UpToDate if you want to learn more about it
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