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hamham

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About hamham

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  • Birthday 04/06/1987

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  1. And all of these tests cost $$$ too. In the end, the rise of NPs would not only lead to poorer medicine, but also cost the system more economically in the long run.
  2. Very surprising, especially since I was specifically told by my preceptor 2 yrs ago during an elective that competition for full-time rad onc jobs remained intense. There was one full-time position in the GVA, and they received 10 strong applications for it (all with at least 2 fellowships). I also know of a friend in rad onc. He started residency the same time I started med sch in 2013. Fast-forward 6 yrs later, I am now a staff but he is still pursuing his second fellowship.
  3. I completed majors in statistics and economics at UTSG. Did well in lots of stats and math courses (got 100% in several courses; my final year avg mark was 95%; my cumulative avg over 4 yrs was 92%). I think if you are good in math, it's much easier to score high marks in these courses. I also completed several life-sci courses (cell/molecular bio, physiology etc), but I was never able to obtain 100% in life-sci courses.
  4. Is Toronto hiring? They just lost a neurosurgeon after he brutally murdered his wife.
  5. 27% failure rate is ridiculous, especially for an exam like this that does a pretty bad job in assessing your actual clinical skills. That said, there will always be complainers, whether failure rate is 10% or 30%, and until more is done about the passing criteria (I suspect things will change in future), you just need to figure out a way to pass this stupid exam (if you fail) so that you can move on with your life. Practice with friends, seek help from Faculty etc won't guarantee a pass, and they will all help.
  6. I think it's the prestige that comes with it. You get to feature in the teaching hospital monthly/yearly magazine. You get to become the poster boy of the hospital (I know H&N cancer surgeons whose faces were seen on side-walls when Princess Margaret Cancer Centre was undergoing renovations several yrs ago. You have the opportunity to make a name for yourself in research by publishing hundreds/thousands of papers in peer-reviewed journals. Even better if you can come up with a new method to improve healthcare, and have it named after you (just ask Dr. Yuzpe). You get to teach the future generations of medicine, and future doctors will continue to remember your name for a long time to come (at least I remembered the gastroenterologist and nephrologist who taught me key lectures in pre-clerkship). All these of course come at a price, but many are willing to go the extra mile to make a name for themselves.
  7. I was told there is a standardized marking scheme for each station, and examiners cannot simply give you a pass b/c they are "nicer".
  8. Just stating a fact that family medicine residents have an advantage over other specialties when it comes to LMCC2. If OP is offended, I apologize.
  9. If this is true, I will definitely ask for for scores to be re-checked. If they confirm, after a re-check, that you still fail, I would focus more on soft skills like empathy, ethics and communication. It is also essential to identify red flag/safety issues, and failure to do so can jeopardize your score (i.e. sending someone home with cardiac chest pain without urgent cardiac consult, failure to remind someone with potential dx of HIV to avoid sexual intercourse, failure to remind someone with possible seizure d/o to avoid driving, sending home a pregnant patient who presented with headache, and HTN w/o further workup or OBS consult etc). Sounds common sense, but you won't believe how many candidates actually fail to recognize these. LMCC2 is essentially a family medicine exam. No other specialty will better prepare you for it, and it is very, very unusual for family medicine residents to fail twice, even with the now higher passing mark. When I was studying for it, my Pathology friends were envious of the advantages I've got over them (they had neither done a neuro exam nor taken a psych hx in >2 years).
  10. If money matters a lot to you, you should not be in Peds. Period.
  11. While article actively explored physician unemployment, it would interesting to also explore the issue of physician under-employment. I have known some in subspecialties that remained underemployed even though they found jobs after completing residency/fellowship.
  12. I am surprised ICU, ENT and Cardiology did not make that list. I know many pursuing these specialties who kept doing fellowships to boost their chances of landing permanent employment.
  13. If you really cannot spend 2 years at Western University, then why did you rank it in the first place?
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