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doctorbetty

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  1. I'm not sure from your post why you feel overwhelmed and depressed, but I can definitely relate! I think those feelings, at least for me, stem from a need to excel in everything I do. Even though it's great to want to excel at everything, a perfectionist attitude can actually backfire... If you're anything like this, remember that high expectations are important, but it is also vital to get your hands and feet dirty once in awhile. Mistakes are actually the best teachers -- they will lead to success but only if you have the right perspective. Remember to take a break from the daily grind, work out or do what ever it is that will help rejuvenate your mind, body, and soul. It also helps to find fill your head with lots of positive ideas and remember WHY you are working so hard. Don't forget your reasons! Some of my favorite inspirational youtube vids:
  2. Just wondering if anyone else in the non-traditional group ever feels discouraged about applying to medical school at an older age? At an older age, I know more about what I want. I am also more familiar with healthcare, and I think I am in a much better position to apply... I just wish I would have figured all of this out in my 20s! There's no doubt in my mind about what I want to do, but sometimes it feels scary. Can anyone relate? How do you get over these negative thoughts and think positively?
  3. I do see a lot in my current role, but I do not have an "insider's look..." I think shadowing a physician will give me a fresh perspective... A nurse has her own job to do and is not thinking or acting like a physician... I want the insider's perspective. If I shadow, I will be able to ask more questions.... I will have a little more time to get to know the docs... Shadowing in a clinic would also be brand new to me.
  4. ... I am keeping my dream safe by not sharing it with such catty nurses...
  5. Thank you so much for all the advice. I do have a couple docs in mind and will take the plunge in a few months after I get to know them all better.
  6. I don't want to harm existing work relationships. However, if I'm able to shadow a doc I already know, perhaps this will help with reference letters later on... It's all part of relationship building. Perhaps the doc will start noticing me a little bit more at the hospital and be able to write a better reference letter about me? If I shadow the doc at the clinic (which is at a different location than my place of work), it will be different than what I usually see at the hospital. Perhaps in addition to this, I could also shadow a few different specialties. But how do I go about contacting doctors I don't even know?
  7. I am an RN in a rural hospital and work closely with a few physicians on a regular basis. I think it would be beneficial to shadow some of these physicians at the clinic. This would give me more insight into their diagnostic thinking, etc... How should I go about asking physicians if I can shadow them? I don't want them to think I'm a conceited nurse who thinks she can be a doctor (but has no clue about the work it takes to get there...). There are also some older doctors who might have old-fashioned ideas about nurses... Help!!
  8. Thanks for all of your advice... It has caused me to think carefully about my plans, and I really appreciate hearing from you since you are an older student yourself :) After giving this some more thought, I have decided that it is best for me to apply for 2016 entry. My fiancé has not always been keen on the idea of me attending medical school because of the huge time commitment. Now that I have his support, I don't want to lose it by not agreeing to our original compromise. (2 years off; MCAT in 2015.) Also, according to the MD Applicant Manual, "deferrals will not be granted for circumstances or opportunities which were foreseen at the time of application... Individuals should not apply if they are not prepared to begin the MD program in [the July of the following year.]". The application process itself will be very time consuming and possibly take away some valuable time that I could spend improving my CV and studying for the MCAT. By focusing on 2016, I think my overall application will be even better. I think I will also have more time to get to know some of the physicians I work with... which might be beneficial.
  9. Vidhya, Thanks for encouraging me to apply this year too! However, if I haven't written the 2015 MCAT, will Admissions still let me defer admission for one year? I've heard that everyone admitted in 2016 needs a 2015 MCAT...
  10. Thanks for the encouragement. It's especially hopeful hearing from other older med students However, I think 2016 will be the first application cycle for me. My fiancé has finally agreed to support me in pursuing this dream, but he would like to have a "break from school" until at least 2016. I, of course, would love to apply before 2016, but school is a huge stress for him too. The whole application process is also very time consuming, and he wants me to be free from all of that for at least one more year. I also have a lot of student debt that I want to pay off, but I'm not sure I would qualify for any of the bursaries you mentioned as my fiancé makes too much $$ in the oil field.... I plan on applying to more schools in 2016 (rather than just two like I did in 2006), so hopefully this will also increase my chances.
  11. Thank you for the hope ~ It is really good to hear that I might still have a chance. And Calgary will definitely be at the top of my list. I wish I could try for this year, but I need to be in a better financial position before I commit to years of school with little to no income... which is why I've chosen 2016. Does anyone know of good MCAT 2015 prep?
  12. I gave up on pursuing medicine in 2007, but that little voice inside my head will not give up… I keep coming back to this goal of becoming a doctor even after all these years. (I am 37 now).... In 2007, I applied to U of C and U of A. Interviewed at U of A and didn’t get in… Since then, I’ve gotten a second degree in nursing. I graduated nursing in 2013 and have been working as an RN for almost a year. Medicine keeps calling my name, especially since I can’t stop thinking about the biochemistry, chemistry, and physics of health and disease…. I also think that I would be in a better position to help my patients as a physician. In my first Bachelor of Science degree (Molecular and Microbiology), I earned a 3.84 GPA. In my second Bachelor of Science degree (Nursing), I earned a 3.74 GPA. My first MCAT was in 2006 and was not the best (30M). Certainly not as good as it would have been if I would have applied myself more. I want to apply for 2016 entry, so I will be writing the 2015 MCAT and studying my butt off for it! I have been looking for volunteering opportunities, but with a full-time RN job (in which my schedule changes from week to week), this is not easy…. Will a lack of volunteering hurt my application? How do my chances look?
  13. Thanks for the explanation. Can you give me any numbers? i.e. how high are the neutrophils elevated with a viral infection? What are some other distinguishing characteristics? The reason this matters to me is because of H1N1 and other contagious viruses. We are supposed to isolate patients who may have these illnesses. The other day, a patient was admitted with pneumonia and was not isolated based on the fact that the pneumonia was bacterial. This classification was made based on the WBC differential - not an actual culture....
  14. I have a question that I hope some genius out there can answer... or at least steer me in the right direction to find an answer. Ok, it's been about 6 years since I took an immunology course and unfortunately I don't have the textbook anymore to refer to... I was just wondering if anyone can explain why a high neutrophil count is usually attributed to bacterial infection, and viral infection is often ruled out? What is the mechanism for this? Is it ever possible to have an elevated (or slightly elevated) neutrophil count in a viral infection? and what would be the mechanism for this? Based on what I know about viruses, it seems that they may evade recognition from the neutrophil by entering host cells and using the host machinery to replicate?? I seem to remember that they also have a different effect on MHC molecules which helps them evade detection, but I don't remember what this is.... Please help with understanding the mechanisms at play here... Or if you know of a good resource to improve my understanding, that would be great! So far, my textbooks have just given a generalized description of neutrophils
  15. I know I might be posting in the wrong forum, but I have a question that I hope a physician can answer... or at least steer me in the right direction to find an answer. I was just wondering if anyone can explain why a high neutrophil count is usually attributed to bacterial infection, and viral infection is often ruled out? What is the mechanism for this? Is it ever possible to have an elevated (or slightly elevated) neutrophil count in a viral infection? and what would be the mechanism for this? Based on what I know about viruses, it seems that they may evade recognition from the neutrophil by entering host cells and using the host machinery to replicate?? I seem to remember that they also have a different effect on MHC molecules which helps them evade detection, but I don't remember what this is.... Please help with understanding the mechanisms at play here... Or if you know of a good resource to improve my understanding, that would be great! So far, my textbooks have just given a generalized description of neutrophils.
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