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affyuser

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  1. Doesn't always work of course but has been known to happen in some instances after emails appealing the decision. It also sometimes depends on how many invites the program has already sent out and if some people have declined interviews opening up new spots.
  2. There are 7 people from Mac in my cohort (PGY1)
  3. Getting an interview at a program after appealing an initial rejection. Has been known to happen at times
  4. For what it's worth in terms of anecdotal evidence, I got rejected pre-interview by Ottawa, Calgary and Western without having done any IM electives there. On the flipside, did get IM interviews at Mac, Queens, UBC, Dal and Saskatchewan without electives there. Ended up matching to UofT IM. From what I heard from my med class (UofT) some programs like Calgary and Ottawa were tough to get without electives there whereas some of the larger programs like UBC had better interview yields even without an elective. Also know of people who got interviews after appealing an initial rejection at some programs (and in some cases ended up matching there!) so if you are really interested in certain programs and didn't initially get an interview, don't have much to lose by sending a statement of interest and asking to be reconsidered for an interview. Also wanted to add that while it would help to have a good local letter for programs you've done electives at. If your instinct tells you that your 3 strongest letters are from your homeschool then it's ok to use those across the board too. That's what I ended up doing and it turned out ok in terms of interview yield.
  5. affyuser

    2018 CaRMS Interview -- INVITATIONS

    Anatomical Pathology: ALL RELEASEDAnesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, USask, Calgary, Western, Queen's, UBC McMaster Dalhousie MUN ManitobaCardiac Surgery: McGillDermatology: Alberta, Calgary, Toronto, McMaster, OttawaDiagnostic Radiology: McGill, Queen's, Calgary, MUN, Dalhousie, UBC, Manitoba, Western, Alberta, Toronto, McMasterEmergency Medicine: Queen's, Sask, Laval, Manitoba, TorontoFamily Medicine: Laval, Sherbrooke, Montreal, Toronto, McGill (Montreal urban, Gatineau), Western, Queen's, Alberta (Urban and Rural), NOSM, MUN, UBC, McMaster, Saskatchewan (Moose Jaw, North Battleford), Calgary (rural), DalhousieGeneral Surgery: Manitoba, McGill, McMaster (Niagara), Dalhousie, Sherbrooke, Ottawa, UBC, TorontoInternal Medicine:Laboratory Medicine:Medical Biochemistry:Medical Genetics: Montreal, McGill, Toronto, Ottawa, UBC, CalgaryNeurology: Manitoba, UBC, Calgary, Memorial, Alberta, Dalhousie, McGill, Western, McMaster, Ottawa, Toronto, SaskatchewanNeurology-Pediatric: Calgary, UBC, Alberta, McMaster, McGill, Ottawa, TorontoNeuropathology:Neurosurgery: UBC, Manitoba, Ottawa, Western, Alberta, Calgary, DalhousieNuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke, Dalhousie, Montreal, McGillObstetrics and Gynecology: Memorial, Manitoba, Calgary, Ottawa, McMaster, UBC, Dalhousie, Toronto, Saskatchewan (Regina and Saskatoon), Queens, MontrealOphthalmology: McGill, Manitoba, Dalhousie, UdeLaval, Western, Alberta, SaskatchewanOrthopedic Surgery: Alberta, Dalhousie, Calgary, UBC, Memorial, McGill, SaskatchewanOtolaryngology: Calgary, McMaster, Alberta, ManitobaPediatrics: UBC, Alberta, Dalhousie, McMaster, Western, Ottawa, Manitoba, Memorial, TorontoPHPM: UBC, AlbertaPlastic Surgery: McMaster, Manitoba, McGill, Laval, AlbertaPM&R: Western, USask, Alberta, UBC, Manitoba, Dal, Toronto, McMaster, Calgary, Queen's, OttawaPsychiatry: McMaster, McMaster (Waterloo), Memorial, Sherbrooke, Western, McGill, Calgary, Manitoba, UBC, Dalhousie, Ottawa, Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Regina), Queens, MontrealRadiation Oncology: Calgary, McMaster, UBCUrology: Ottawa, McMasterVascular Surgery: Western, McMaster, Calgary
  6. affyuser

    2018 CaRMS Interview -- INVITATIONS

    Anatomical Pathology: ALL RELEASEDAnesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, USask, Calgary, Western, Queen's, UBC McMaster Dalhousie MUNCardiac Surgery: McGillDermatology: Alberta, Calgary, Toronto, McMasterDiagnostic Radiology: McGill, Queen's, Calgary, MUN, Dalhousie, UBC, Manitoba, Western, Alberta, TorontoEmergency Medicine: Queen's, Sask, Laval, ManitobaFamily Medicine: Laval, Sherbrooke, Montreal, Toronto, McGill (Montreal urban, Gatineau), Western, Queen's, Alberta (Urban and Rural), NOSM, MUN, UBC, McMaster, Saskatchewan (Moose Jaw, North Battleford), Calgary (rural), DalhousieGeneral Surgery: Manitoba, McGill, McMaster (Niagara), Dalhousie, Sherbrooke, Ottawa, UBC, TorontoInternal Medicine:Laboratory Medicine:Medical Biochemistry:Medical Genetics: Montreal, McGill, Toronto, Ottawa, UBC, CalgaryNeurology: Manitoba, UBC, Calgary, Memorial, Alberta, Dalhousie, McGill, Western, McMaster, Ottawa, Toronto, SaskatchewanNeurology-Pediatric: Calgary, UBC, Alberta, McMaster, McGill, Ottawa, TorontoNeuropathology:Neurosurgery: UBC, Manitoba, Ottawa, Western, Alberta, Calgary, DalhousieNuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke, Dalhousie, Montreal, McGillObstetrics and Gynecology: Memorial, Manitoba, Calgary, Ottawa, McMaster, UBC, Dalhousie, Toronto, Saskatchewan (Regina and Saskatoon), QueensOphthalmology: McGill, Manitoba, Dalhousie, UdeLaval, WesternOrthopedic Surgery: Alberta, Dalhousie, Calgary, UBC, Memorial, McGill, SaskatchewanOtolaryngology: Calgary, McMaster, Alberta, ManitobaPediatrics:PHPM: UBC, AlbertaPlastic Surgery: McMaster, Manitoba, McGill, Laval, AlbertaPM&R: Western, USask, Alberta, UBC, Manitoba, Dal, Toronto, McMaster, Calgary, Queen'sPsychiatry: McMaster, McMaster (Waterloo), Memorial, Sherbrooke, Western, McGill, Calgary, Manitoba, UBC, Dalhousie, Ottawa, Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Regina), Queens, MontrealRadiation Oncology: Calgary, McMaster, UBCUrology: Ottawa, McMasterVascular Surgery: Western, McMaster, Calgary
  7. If you are a grad student applicant, definitely emphasize the research, have heard it is a significant component of the academic pre-interview score (together with undergrad GPA) ------------------ UofT Med '18
  8. If I remember correctly from last year, the single online course shouldn't affect the eligibility of your previous completed degree for the weighting, It might be helpful to send an email to admissions asking about this though.
  9. affyuser

    Physics Pre-Req: Ryerson, UTSC, UofT?

    I don't think Ryerson posts the course times and available spots online for public viewing before the semester actually starts. So you will probably have to contact the First year and Common Science office in the link above about the course times and whether enrolling as a special student is still possible. Dr. Andrew Laursen is a good person to contact, he is pretty helpful. I did meet some applicants last year who had been accepted to US med schools and were missing 1 or 2 prerequisite courses which they completed the summer before starting. They said all prerequisites had to be completed by the time of starting med school (not at the tme of application) but you should probably confirm that with the specific med schools you are thinking of applying to
  10. affyuser

    Physics Pre-Req: Ryerson, UTSC, UofT?

    If the Chang school night courses don't work, Another option would be take the courses during the day in the regular school year at Ryerson as a special student (This is what I did last year for Physics 1 and 2) http://www.ryerson.ca/science/students/special/ Ryerson typically accept applications for this much later than the UofT non-degree student application but am not sure if September entry is still possible right now. I applied in July last year.. The classes would be twice a week though (2 hour + 1 hour blocks) and the lab would occupy another 3 hour block
  11. affyuser

    Physics Pre-Req: Ryerson, UTSC, UofT?

    If you are able to attend evenings, I would definitely recommend Ryerson's Chang school. I took many prereqs there last year. The registration process is pretty straightforward. Looks like Physics 1 with lab (CPCS 120) is offered in the winter semester (6 to 9 pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays) http://ce-online.ryerson.ca/ce/calendar/default.aspx?id=5&section=course&mode=course&ccode=CPCS%20120 Physics 2 with lab (CPCS 130) is offered next spring/summer http://ce-online.ryerson.ca/ce/calendar/default.aspx?id=5&section=course&mode=course&ccode=CPCS%20130
  12. Definitely apply for a range of US medical schools. Although you will be limited to those that consider Canadian applicants, that's still quite a few ( 30-40) and there are some other schools which only consider foreign applicants if they have an American undergraduate degree so you can add those as well. The list on the American medical school subforum at this site and the MSAR would help in picking schools. The premed committee letter you get from your US undergrad would also help in applying to American schools as the average applicant from a Canadian undergrad school won't have this. If you get your GPA up to 3.5 as you plan to and also do well on the MCAT, you should be a competitive applicant in the US, especially with your extracurricular, employment and research experiences. The Ivy league undergrad should also help to some degree for US med schools whereas in Canada, specific school reputation doesn't really affect the way your undergrad GPA is assessed. For Canadian med schools you can try the ones which take only the GPA from your best (or last) 2 or 3 years (like Queen's, Western and Dalhousie) if you meet their MCAT cutoffs as well as your in province school. If you do decide to do a grad degree, UofT is also an option as they have lower GPA cutoffs for grad students.
  13. affyuser

    Verbal Reasoning

    Well, verbal is challenging but it's definitely possible to improve with practice. The key is to find an approach that you are comfortable with and that lets you get to all 7 passages in the given time. I got 11 and I found the Examkrackers verbal strategy (mentally paraphrasing each paragraph and really focusing on the main idea of the passage) helpful and less time-consuming than some of the other approaches (like Princeton Review's plan of categorizing passages by difficulty and previewing questions). Princeton's Verbal Workbook is a pretty good practice resource though and when combined with the AAMC resources (the 8 full length tests and diagnostic self assessments) as well as the EK101 Passage Book, that's lots of quality VR practice material that you can use to perfect the approach that works best for you and also get your sense of timing right. Analyzing your answers after every full-length test also helps in finding the specific question types that you find particularly challenging and that you need more practice with.
  14. affyuser

    Verbal Reasoning

    11 in VR should let you meet the cutoff for all schools including those which use the highest verbal score cutoffs (Western, Calgary). From the scales for the AAMC practice tests, that corresponds to around 33-35 correct out of 40 but this can vary based on the specific version of the test that you write.
  15. affyuser

    GPA question

    I got in as a grad student with a 3.5 cGPA (did not qualify for UofT weighting).
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