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Clever

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About Clever

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  • Birthday 08/15/1916

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    Tel Aviv
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    Scrubbing toilets

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  1. They won't see the whole thing but they might be asked to clarify something you wrote. Usually they just call to see if you actually did said activity.
  2. Might be a problem if you said you will be graduating by June but according to your application you won't have enough credits to do so. I would just call them on Monday and ask.
  3. If you are looking to maximize the likelihood of getting into med I would personally go to UWO (out of those 3 choices). Why? Because an A+ in ontario is typically 90% and transfers to UBC as 95%.
  4. A year off to work and volunteer, as Gohan suggested, may be helpful in giving you time to reflect on exactly what happened during your undergrad degree. When you're immersed in studies it's tough to be able to identify issues and solutions since you have many things on your mind. I don't see counselors as being able to solve problems, but rather help you identify them.
  5. Well, can you think of a reason that you didn't do well in your first few years? Maybe you really do have an undiagnosed issue that has prevented you from reaching your full potential. Making an appointment with a counselor may shed some light. The diagnosis of GAD or depression is not shared with the med schools so there isn't an issue there.
  6. Have you looked into applying for government loans? Even if you did not qualify before, if you have been out of highschool for a certain number of years the income of your parents won't be taken into consideration. A large amount may come in the form of bursaries that you won't need to pay back.
  7. Personally, I would have no problem listening to Danger Zone by Kenny Loggins for 17 hours straight if I'm driving. I should also mention that starting the road trip with Highway Star by Deep Purple is required.
  8. A masters is not a bad idea if you plan on going for a more competitive specialty. For now focus on doing well on the MCAT, and then doing well in your final year. Short term goals, my friend!
  9. The newer versions will give you a better idea of what to focus on. The 2015 books were released without ever having seen the new exam so they were partially shooting in the dark with regards to what will be tested. Sure, the AAMC lists topics. But that's like a prof telling you everything discussed in lecture and in the book is fair game for the exam. You will do well if you know everything, of course, but that's inefficient and a huge waste of time. The new books will focus a lot more on bchem and having a book devoted to ochem is pointless. Will they get rid of ochem? Well, not if they can still make you pay for it... So while the science likely won't change, the focus will.
  10. I haven't read anything about there being a problem with taking courses online. As long as you're meeting the full course load requirements you should be fine.
  11. Shortening anything will just lead to a favor of quantity over quality. Our system is far from perfect, but shortening training without addressing anything else will make things worse. I think the 4 years of UG are great for personal growth and maturity, like Birdy said. There is a particular medical school in Canada where a student got in after 2 years of UG and the last I heard was he repeated first or second year 3 times because he wasn't sure he wanted to do medicine. This isn't common, but shows a weakness of shortening UG. The problem with 3 year med schools is that some students don't have enough time to decide what area they want to get into. And if you change your mind at some point after discovering you have a strong passion for ROAD or any other competitive specialty, you will probably not match to it, leaving you unhappy with your job. As for shortening residency, if you look at 5 year programs there is usually huge knowledge gaps between R1, R2... R5, and staff. Why shorten it? You still get paid as a resident and by R5 it's pretty decent. I'm not familiar with the American system so I don't know what they're leaving out of their programs.
  12. I worked for a company and one of my jobs was to go over resumes and interview potential candidates. We would receive 20-30 resumes per week so I have read over a thousand and they all fall into one of 3 categories. 1. Poorly done. These may have spelling or grammar mistakes, or just look untidy and unprofessional. About 5-10% of submitted resumes. 2. Not tailored to the job they were applying. You could tell these guys printed dozens of copies and gave them to every store in the district. About 70-80% of resumes 3. Well done, polished, appropriate. These typically have relevant job experience, and indicate how their skills well help them be successful in the position. About 10-15% of resumes The first group is almost immediately sent to the recycle bin without being read. Except for occasional comic purposes. When I read resumes from the second group I look at the "objective" "attributes" "qualifications" or something alike, and if they are not relevant to the company I will throw them out without reading their education, work history, or anything else. The third group gets carefully considered and if we are hiring or looking to expand will invite 5-8 per position. What distinguishes members within this group? Experience. (Not saying the more the better, but is situational). tl;dr - If you want more responses tailor your resume for the job you're applying. Employers want to see you give a damn about what you'll be doing instead of just seeking income.
  13. If it's a 125 on TPR then you're gold. Otherwise, just know your bchem and you'll be fine on both chem/phys and bio sections (real MCAT). The new exam mainly tests your mental stamina and ability to make sense of presented information. Read some scientific articles for practice and you should be better off.
  14. To be able to give you better advice we would need to know a little bit more about your courses. You mentioned that you failed some courses early on but did very well in your next two years. Were any of the courses you took in your final two years repeats of ones you had failed, or were they options that didn't affect your ability to take higher level courses? If you did retake some there might be a more complicated answer as to how schools will look at your GPA.
  15. 1 bad year won't screw you over at any school (except maybe mac) Especially when it was your first year Keep working hard and you will have no problem getting in
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