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z3u2

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  1. Sydney has great weather, better weather than probably any Canadian cities.. There's not a lot of Ramen in the city, and the sushi qualities are poor.....there is a lot of Thai food though.... I don't see why lack of interview is a problem for you, as you have been accepted to both programs anyway. I think if you already like Melbourne the city then it should be an easier choice for you.
  2. I studied in Sydney and came back to Canada about 5-6 years ago and have been working full time in private practice since. Over the years I have worked with colleagues that graduated from various Canadian/American dental schools. Slowly over this period, I felt we learned better than many (not all) North American graduates. I didn't feel this way during my studying nor right after I graduated. I only observed it after a few years of working with other colleagues. It is hard to compare which specific discipline is taught better, because it is way too broad of a discussion. Sydney has its weak spots/curriculum that can be taught better, but overall I think we received more solid fundamental knowledge comparing to some Canadian/American dental school graduates. I cannot speak of Melbourne program because I have actually never met any graduates from the school. I can speak that PBL isn't an issue of learning. Back then we called it problem based learning, maybe now it's called peer based learning? The lectures are still lecture based, not PBL style. PBL only applies to small group studies where you are given a series of "problem" each week and you learn from "solving" this problem by studying the lectures for that week. It helps you formulate solutions, essentially what you will be doing when you start working.
  3. an example of oral pathologist's private office: http://opusoralhealth.ca/the-clinic/
  4. z3u2

    Dent

    You should go to UQ if becoming a dentist is your ultimate goal. There's no guarantee that you will get accepted after you finish undergrad. Depression/cultural difference, sure it may happen. But you are young, and this is the opportunity for you to develop yourself and adapt to a new environment. Better to do it now then never. Just curious, who is your general dentist?
  5. The summer between the third and the fourth year? It'll be the last summer break for a long, long time... the next time you take two month or more off during summer is probably 40 year years later when you are retiring... once you start working, esp full time, it's difficult to take such a long time off. Difficult for your patients, difficult for your offices. Unless you are taking a one year maternity leave...but then you get another issue to deal with. so, enjoy it, but don't waste it.
  6. z3u2

    Usask Tuition Increase

    I wonder if it's not "tuition", can it be used is tuition deductible when you file your tax in the future.
  7. z3u2

    Md->Dds

    one person in our year finished med school before studying dentistry. I always assumed he was pursuing OMFS. Lost contact with him since dental school. Just googled him now. Seems like he's working both as medical doctor and general dentist at various clinics.
  8. of course not. They can't take your license away after rules change and you are already licensed. Like if the immigration rules to Canada changes, you can't deport the old immigrates who already got their citizenship.
  9. yes not everyone want to be a business owner. Running a dental practice is different from working as a dentist.
  10. I've read somewhere else prior to the election that they would not allow income split for corporations with only one employee (essentially yourself). the article above also mentions quebec already restricts lower tax on corp with less than four full time employees...
  11. where did you get the number of $250k? I don't think you are understanding what the article is saying. There isn't a set number. You could get a hit if you are incorporated. Let's say if your net income per year is $150K, your spouse makes $0. You can income split and give $75k to her and keep $75K to yourself so you are both in the (significantly) lower tax bracket. The argument here is they are trying to remove this income splitting feature.
  12. z3u2

    Associate Percentage

    I'm about 3 years out. At the moment I've decided I will not take anything less than 40% anymore. This may be true. If you are planning to work there short term, I think it doesn't really matter. But in the long term, you will start to feel "I'm doing this much work, I should be getting 14% more of what I'm getting. Why am I getting paid less?". If you start feeling this, then you are not going to enjoy doing what you do. You should also look at short term/long term, where can you develop your skills?? What do you like to learn more? Will you get opportunity to do what you like to do? Or you are stuck with hygiene and restorations? you should ask where is their previous new associate is now. Why did they leave? Is it because they aren't satisfied with their paid percentage? this is lame. and it's their way of saying they are taking advantage of you. Everything being said. It's up to you if you want to take it. Whether you want to do it long term or short term. Some people are happy with 35% and stick with it for a long time, for some people that 5% is very important. I also know there are offices that pay 45%. Regardless of where you decide, NEVER sign a contract with working restrictions in the area until you've worked there for a while and are certain that it's a place you want to stay long term.
  13. Found for you. This was old information though, things may have changed US states that don't require a US/Canadian Dental degree for licensure California: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Florida: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Illinois: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Kentucky: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Louisiana: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Michigan: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Minnesota: (this is the only US state that will actually still allow you to apply for a dental license without having to complete any additional training) Mississippi: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Nevada: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) New Hampshire: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) New York: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Ohio: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Oregon: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Puerto Rico: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Tennessee: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Texas: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) Virginia: (only requires 1 year of GPR or AEGD to obtain a state license) Washington: (must complete either 2 year GPR/AEGD or US/Canadian accredited specialty program) (It may be useful to mention that some of these above states require a State Board Exam to be passed. Florida, I hear, is notoriously difficult. Most of these states will also require passing of a regional board exam. Plan carefully, for everyone considering this route.)
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