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robclem21

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robclem21 last won the day on November 5 2018

robclem21 had the most liked content!

About robclem21

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    Toronto, Ontario

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  1. robclem21

    McGill vs U of T Life Sciences

    This has a lot more to do with applicant preferences rather than chances of admission from the medical school. Those who attend UofT likely live close by, have connections and family in the area and therefore want to remain in Toronto, whereas those who live in Quebec are more likely to stay close to home in Montreal. Medical schools don't discriminate based on where you complete your undergraduate degree so go somewhere where you can be happy, do well academically, and have some good social support.
  2. Makes no difference what school you are. They will be able to see everything, but medical schools won't care if you switch programs or schools. Yes, your GPA will count. How they count varies by school as every school has their own GPA calculation policies. However, that goes by year, and not by location. Neither is more advantageous for medicine. Med schools do not care what your major is in. Physiology may give you better prep for MCAT as the mandatory courses will likely be more related, but you can do well on MCAT with any major. Do what you like.
  3. robclem21

    most competitive anesthesiology programs?

    And despite having great programs in some cases, the cities are also very unattractive for many... (i.e. completely unaffordable).
  4. robclem21

    most competitive anesthesiology programs?

    By the time you get to that stage, more people are looking at personal factors (location, family, significant others, affordability, etc.) and less at the actual characteristics of the program. Most programs across Canada are similar and all of them will provide an exceptional training. Everyone has their own reasons for ranking various programs the way they do. All spots were filled after the first iteration this year, and I imagine the overall match statistics should be similar to last year with about 0.7 spots per applicant.
  5. robclem21

    Weird EC's?

    You have to be very careful with items like this on an application. While they are unique and no doubt things you are passionate about, poor descriptions with the wrong focus can certainly cause you a lot of trouble. I have reviewed files and interviewed applicants for medical school and I can honestly tell you that based on your entries above, you would receive a low score from me. Now others will have their own opinion and it may differ from mine, but there are also many that will likely share my opinion and that is what makes it risky to apply with an ABS like this without refining it. I don't want you to think of my feedback here as "don't include these things, they are stupid" (they are part of what make your story unique), but to encourage you to spend some time reflecting on them. I'm gonna start by agreeing with others that using terms like "shooting" and "sniper" have a very negative connotation to them. Avoid using them. Second, comments like "spectate matches and review match results", to me is just fancy for "I watched online gaming". You won't confuse or impress the admission committees with fancy words and prose. Mentioning how you learned "C4D/Photoshop" is also great, but doesn't tell me much about how you will be as a doctor. Did you self teach yourself a new skill? Does this make you self-directed...? etc... You mention leadership and responsibility. Those ARE important qualities for a physician and you hardly mention or elaborate on them at all in your descriptions. Nobody cares about what your responsibilities were unless they somehow directly relate to what you learned and how it will make you a strong medical student. "Responsibilities include but are not limited to: Moderating posts and posters, as well as writing up blogs." This sounds like a job description post for job applicants and tells me nothing about the activity or about you as a person. I get that you have an interest in hockey. That is great, so do I... but the focus here should not be hockey or your interest in it. It is how you used something you were interested in to enhance your personal qualities... communication, leadership, etc. Anyone reading it will see that you like hockey and think thats cool, but they also need to learn something else important about you. Lastly, the way you describe your roles and talk about each activity has a very juvenile and immature tone to it, completely independent of the actual activities. These types of activities are good to include, but you really really really need to work on conveying why they are important and worth talking about. As it stands right now, you would be better off to omit them.
  6. robclem21

    Awards and Scholorships

    I don't think this will be the issue holding you back. Aside from scouring the schools website for things to apply to, there's not much else to do. Wouldn't stress over this.
  7. robclem21

    Abortion

    Nothing that is politically charged will ever be asked in an MMI or interview. MMI's like to use non-medicine situations to get at your ethical/problem solving skills, so what is important is to find how that situation links to medicine and mention how your approach to that specific problem will be helpful in your career as a physician.
  8. This. You should do what will help you most should you NOT get into medicine. Not what will help you get into medicine. Your experiences are much easier to talk about honestly and passionately when there is some strong rationale for pursuing them that is not "it makes my medicine application stronger". Also, why not write the MCAT and apply across Canada. That would prob be the number 1 thing to strengthen your chances because your application seems fairly strong already.
  9. This 100%. Especially the last sentence.
  10. robclem21

    2019 CaRMS unfilled spots

    Overall, looks better than last year, but definitely a really rough year for certain schools.
  11. I don't know how the new restrictions on electives work with regards to number of weeks, but I would do as many as possible in your interested field (provided you aren't applying to be a generalist/primary care). Unfortunately, electives are not a time to "learn" as much as you want it to be that. It is a time to stand out clinically and make connections. Use your selective time or post-carms clinical time to learn radiology if you are interested. Just my opinion.
  12. I agree, though only mildly, and so I'm not sure the risk-reward is there, given that year will do nothing to further your life in any other area.
  13. It is assessed competitively, but subjectively. Nobody truly knows how it is evaluated, but likely it is done in a matter similar to the ABS/Personal Essays. Several people will examine your CV and rank it on a numerical scale. The average of which will determine your score. There are usually some laid out "guidelines" for evaluating components of the application, but more often it's the reviewers judgement. Regarding journal IF, everything is field relevant. I don't think it matters too much at the end of the day unless it is a big name journal recognizable across specialties. Some fields don't have journals with IF much above 3-4, while others go much higher. Similarly, some fields even publish much more than others so even productivity on the whole is research dependent. Based on the fact you have two first authored papers, I am assuming you are in some sort of clinical/epidemiological research department. I would try to get that second paper in before the deadline in the fall and try to attend another conference or two in the summer (even if local). The more you are able to talk about on your CV the better. Your GPA is low, but at this point not sure I would recommend going backwards to undergrad. Would be better of spending your time contingency planning and setting yourself up for another career if medicine doesn't work out.
  14. robclem21

    Studying to be a good clerk

    I don't remember the last time I took a BP...
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