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murphy303

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  1. Anatomical Pathology: Queen's, Manitoba, Western, Dalhousie, UBC, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa, Memorial, Alberta, McGill Anesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, Calgary, Sherbrooke, Memorial, Alberta, McMaster, Western, UBC, Queens, Saskatchewan, Dalhousie, Manitoba Cardiac Surgery: Manitoba, UBC, Western Dermatology: Alberta, Toronto, McMaster Diagnostic Radiology: Ottawa, Memorial, Queen's, Manitoba, Calgary, McGill, Toronto, McMaster, Dalhousie, Saskatchewan, Western Emergency Medicine: Laval, Queen's, Saskatchewan Family Medicine: Montreal, Sherbrooke, Laval, Western, Toronto, McGill, McGill - Gatineau, McMaster, Alberta (Red Deer, Grande Prairie, Edmonton - Urban), Saskatchewan (MJ, Regina, Swift Current, North Battleford, La Ronge), NOSM General Pathology: General Surgery: UBC, McGill, McMaster (Niagara), Manitoba Hematopathology: Alberta, UBC, Ottawa Internal Medicine: Laval Laboratory Medicine: Medical Biochemistry: Medical Genetics: Calgary, Toronto, UBC Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Dalhousie, Ottawa, Western, Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba, McMaster, UBC, McGill Neurology - Paediatric: UBC, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, McMaster, McGill, Ottawa Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: UBC Nuclear Medicine: McGill Obstetrics and Gynecology: Manitoba, Montreal, Alberta, Toronto, Memorial, Queens, McGill, McMaster, Saskatchewan (Regina, Saskatoon), Ottawa Ophthalmology: UBC, Western, Ottawa, Manitoba Orthopaedic Surgery: Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, Calgary, Dalhousie, McMaster Otolaryngology: Calgary, Alberta, Manitoba, McMaster Paediatrics: McGill, Saskatchewan, Dalhousie, Alberta, UBC (Vancouver), Manitoba Plastic Surgery: Manitoba, Dalhousie, McMaster PM&R: Dal, UBC, Queen's, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Western, Toronto, Ottawa, Alberta, Calgary Psychiatry: McMaster, Western, Memorial, Calgary, Alberta, McGill, Queen's, Ottawa, Manitoba, UBC, Dalhousie Public Health: Calgary, Manitoba, Alberta, NOSM, McMaster, Saskatchewan Radiation Oncology: McMaster Urology: UBC, Dalhousie, McMaster, Western Vascular Surgery: Toronto, Western
  2. Anatomical Pathology: Queen's, Manitoba, Western, Dalhousie, UBC, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa, Memorial, Alberta Anesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, Calgary, Sherbrooke, Memorial, Alberta, McMaster, Western, UBC, Queens, Saskatchewan Cardiac Surgery: Manitoba, UBC, Western Dermatology: Alberta, Toronto, McMaster Diagnostic Radiology: Ottawa, Memorial, Queen's, Manitoba, Calgary, McGill, Toronto, McMaster, Dalhousie, Saskatchewan, Western Emergency Medicine: Laval, Queen's, Saskatchewan Family Medicine: Montreal, Sherbrooke, Laval, Western, Toronto, McGill, McMaster, Alberta (Red Deer, Grande Prairie, Edmonton - urban), Saskatchewan (MJ, Regina, Swift Current, North Battleford), U of A FM General Pathology: General Surgery: UBC, McGill, McMaster (Niagara), Manitoba Hematopathology: Alberta, UBC, Ottawa Internal Medicine: Laval Laboratory Medicine: Medical Biochemistry: Medical Genetics: Calgary, Toronto Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Dalhousie, Ottawa, Western, Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba, McMaster, UBC, McGill Neurology - Paediatric: UBC, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, McMaster, McGill, Ottawa Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: UBC Nuclear Medicine: McGill Obstetrics and Gynecology: Manitoba, Montreal, Alberta, Toronto, Memorial, Queens, McGill, McMaster, Saskatchewan (Regina, Saskatoon), Ottawa Ophthalmology: UBC, Western, Ottawa Orthopaedic Surgery: Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, Calgary, Dalhousie, McMaster Otolaryngology: Calgary, Alberta, Manitoba, McMaster Paediatrics: McGill, Saskatchewan, Dalhousie, Alberta, UBC (Vancouver), Manitoba Plastic Surgery: Manitoba, Dalhousie, McMaster PM&R: Dal, UBC, Queen's, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Western, Toronto, Ottawa, Alberta, Calgary Psychiatry: McMaster, Western, Memorial, Calgary, Alberta, McGill, Queen's, Ottawa, Manitoba, UBC, Dalhousie Public Health: Calgary, Manitoba, Alberta, NOSM, McMaster, Saskatchewan Radiation Oncology: McMaster Urology: UBC, Dalhousie, McMaster, Western Vascular Surgery: Toronto, Western I just got a FM McGill invite too (didn't have one until 5 minutes ago)
  3. Anatomical Pathology: Queen's, Manitoba, Western, Dalhousie, UBC, Calgary Anesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, Calgary, Sherbrooke, Memorial Cardiac Surgery: Manitoba, UBC, Western Dermatology: Alberta Diagnostic Radiology: Ottawa, Memorial, Queen's, Manitoba, Calgary, McGill, Toronto Emergency Medicine: Laval, Queen's Family Medicine: Montreal, Sherbrooke, Laval, Western, Toronto, McGill, McMaster, Alberta (Red Deer, Grande Prairie), Sask (MJ, Regina, Swift Current) General Pathology: General Surgery: UBC, McGill, MCMASTER (NIAGARA) Hematopathology: Alberta, UBC, Ottawa Internal Medicine: Laval Laboratory Medicine: Medical Biochemistry: Medical Genetics: Calgary, Toronto Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Dalhousie, Ottawa, Western, Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba Neurology - Pediatric: UBC, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, McMaster, McGill Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: UBC Nuclear Medicine: McGill Obstetrics and Gynecology: Manitoba, Montreal, Alberta, Toronto, Memorial Ophthalmology: Orthopedic Surgery: Saskatchewan, UofA, Manitoba, Calgary Otolaryngology: Calgary, UofA Pediatrics: McGill, Saskatchewan, Dalhousie, Alberta Plastic Surgery: Manitoba PM&R: Dal, UBC, Queen's, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Western, Toronto, Ottawa, UofA Psychiatry: McMaster, Western, Memorial, Calgary, Alberta, McGill, Queen's, Ottawa, Manitoba, UBC Public Health: Calgary, Manitoba, Alberta, NOSM, McMaster, Saskatchewan Radiation Oncology: McMaster Urology: Vascular Surgery: Toronto, Western
  4. Haha thanks, totally reasonable. I posted from my phone, so just edited it now =)
  5. Anatomical Pathology: Queen's, Manitoba, Western, Dalhousie Anesthesiology: NOSM, Ottawa, Calgary, Sherbrooke, Memorial Cardiac Surgery: Manitoba, UBC, Western Dermatology: Alberta Diagnostic Radiology: Ottawa, Memorial, Queen's, Manitoba, Calgary,McGill Emergency Medicine: Laval, Queen's Family Medicine: Montreal, Sherbrooke, Laval, Western, Toronto, McGill, McMaster, UAlberta (red deer, grand prairie) General Pathology: General Surgery: UBC Hematopathology: Alberta, UBC, Ottawa Internal Medicine: Laval Laboratory Medicine: Medical Biochemistry: Medical Genetics: Calgary, Toronto Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Dalhousie, Ottawa, Western, Alberta Neurology - Pediatric: UBC Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: UBC Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynecology: Manitoba, Montreal, Alberta, U of T, MUN Ophthalmology: Orthopedic Surgery: Saskatchewan Otolaryngology: Calgary Pediatrics: McGill Plastic Surgery: Manitoba PM&R: Dal, UBC, Queen's, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Western,Toronto, Ottawa Psychiatry: McMaster, Western, Memorial, Calgary, Alberta, McGill Public Health: Calgary, Manitoba, Alberta, NOSM, McMaster Radiation Oncology: McMaster Urology: Vascular Surgery: Toronto, Western
  6. Hey there, I did a degree in computer science before medicine and am graduating from medicine at UBC in a few months. About "simple things": Be humble. When you're in medical school, during your early clinical experiences, you'll be doing simple things all the time like holding a retractor, writing a progress note or fetching supplies for procedures. Much of primary care medicine is, in a sense, "simple things" like smiling and chatting with little old ladies or placating a crying child with some distraction technique. When you're volunteering you should be focusing on how you can provide a useful service for your community and how you can develop your social skills which will need to be pretty impeccable if you want to be a great doctor. Nothing should be "beneath you". My main piece of advice is to really carefully consider if medicine is really for you before proceeding and if you decide to proceed then it should be 100%. Good luck!
  7. Hey folks! To everyone that got rejected without an invite: This happened to me for 3 years in a row. Until I finally got interviewed and accepted on my 4th try and am now graduating in a few months. Keep your heads up and continue to work hard, if you want it, it will come!
  8. Generally we are doing and not "observing". In Australia they spend 3rd and 4th year observing -- as per my Australian colleagues at the end of their 4th year on elective here who had never done half the things the Canadians are long used to doing by end of 3rd year. I'm not saying their education is poor. It isn't. It is very good. But their system has no call and they stretch out training more gradually instead of throwing you into the deep end. I'm finishing UBC 3rd year so I am sure I know these other posters. For me I had 3+ months of rotations starting at 0600 and typically work 10 to 12 hour days with about 7 24 to 30 hour call shifts per 6 week rotation. Not all rotations have call. Sometimes you work continuously without sleep. On some rotations we truly have life and death responsibility. When you are covering a general surgery floor in a major hospital and it is just you and the staff (which happens once in a while when the stars align and there are no residents although it should never happen) you will be telling your attending whether you think he or she should book an OR and come to the hospital for a surgical case. Sometimes you may be the only one on surgery in the hospital despite having minimal surgical training (ie. this is your first surgery experience). Some of your consults are very sick. Several of my consults did not survive the subsequent 24 hours on my general surgery rotation. The residents have the real responsibility. As medical students we are not ultimately held responsible for any patient as long as we are not negligent. Residents will almost always shield you and your role is mostly to support them and learn from them. They are handling the badness. But they are not always there and nurses and patients will look at you for answers. A few things will happen that shouldn't. On my rural medicine rotation I was alone in the ER when a high speed MVA patient came in by BCAS. Thankfully the ER doctor arrived moments after the patient but it was incredibly stressful. Shit does happen. We all have those stories. In the course of your duties you will be the first assistant on major surgeries and may do the closure on your own with supervision. You will report back on medically sick patients that your resident will choose to deprioritize based on your report. There are endless examples of this sort of thing. Yes. The medical culture is sort of toxic and some staff, residents and nurses can be really cruel. The vast majority of people are super nice but I will never forget some of the things that people did in the past year. Being openly ridiculed by a scrub nurse for doing the skin closure more slowly than the residents. Being humiliated by staff during rounds in front of the entire medical team for not knowing a component of the respiratory exam. Being physically shoved out of the way by an irrate orthopedic surgeon. Some people have no life experience outside of medicine and their status as X (MSI; resident; fellow; staff) in the medical hierarchy goes to their heads. Or they have been conditioned by the system. It's really toxic sometimes. On the other hand I had some of the most incredibly positive experiences with so many residents and staff people that I will never forget. And it makes an astronomical difference in my motivation and learning outcomes when you have those positive interactions. I pledge to myself every day to treat everyone like the dignified human being that they are and to not become a victim of the rat race. I will never shit on a medical student. I am so grateful for those attendings who are brilliant, accomplished people 10 years ahead in their careers who shake your hand and chat with you like you are a complete equal -- not because they are good at faking it but because they actually see you as an equal albeit earlier on in your training. Others lack that perspective. Ironically in 20 or 30 years I may be the physician seeing this attending in the ER long after he/she has retired and now has an obstructed bowel. Life is funny that way so keep it real. I feel like I have done and seen things in the last year that are impossible to describe. It has taken a lot out of me though. Sometimes I feel like I am just coping. So glad it's almost done and I can move onto my electives in my chosen field and not have to deal with exams all the time. (ie. 4th year). These thoughts are just my own. The other students may have a very different take on things that is just as valid. Get as many perspectives as you can. I wish you all the best in your medical pursuits.
  9. I know 2 wait lister s and about a half dozen ppl who got in and a half dozen who didn't What's so unbelievable about it
  10. hm, almost every year there are people posting that they got in off waitlist?? this is unusual
  11. this is not right never heard anything about incompetent or unprepared students and there has not been any major curriculum overhaul in past few years... the core curriculum has been virtually identical (although accounting for changes, eg. DSM V) for a long time and they are just in the process of preparing the major overhaul now
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