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GH0ST

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GH0ST last won the day on June 20 2017

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About GH0ST

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  • Birthday 03/26/1991

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  1. To be completely honest I had already satisfied the minimum required elective time in order to graduate with a few weeks left over... I had more flexibility. I probably wouldn't recommend that in a 3 year program where you may have less elective time (I may be wrong though). Best wishes, - G
  2. @JohnGrisham The course is called the National Public Health review course hosted by Queens University. Sometimes if you get an elective with Queens during the time the course is held you get to do that as part of your elective. It will depend on your preceptor and I do think you have to ask. For me, I did not initially secure an elective at Queens but the program director recommended that I come as part of an educational experience. It was during my elective time and I figured I'll take a week's leave and go to the course. It's good learning, I can write about it, and I get to meet some amazing residents and faculty from across the country. - G
  3. Did them at Alberta and Manitoba. Also did a one week review course for R4/R5 PHPM residents at Queens. Speak up Participate in meetings and actually try to contribute Always ask questions Try to get a project during your elective time that you can present to a large audience. (did a project where I presented to the COO and multiple MOHs at a senior meeting that was well received). As for letters... if you do the above and show keen interest, you can ask at any time and most MOHs would be happy to help. Best wishes, - G
  4. I mean if you're talking about public health practitioners vs MOHs there's a difference in amount of work. It's similar to FM where once you start practicing you have some more control as to how busy you will be depending on the level of responsibility you take / get hired for. But I do agree at the med student level no one expects you to contribute significantly to a population health assessment or know the ins and outs of surveillance data. For a one-time elective it will be mostly shadowing and learning different aspects of those jobs. It will also depend on how long you want to do the elective for. Having done a 2 week vs 4 week elective in PHPM I did considerably more work in the 4 week one (albeit I was also trying to get noticed) than the 2 week one where I mostly shadowed. - G
  5. Duuuuuude yeah they told me the same thing... I tried everything from asking around with classmates and colleagues... I have the same conflicts with other FM or PHPM+FM interviews and I was banking so hard on that day... It just sucks that people could lose a good opportunity just because of issues like this of all things. Good luck to you too dude. - G
  6. I'm in a difficult situation and really need help from members of PM101 My computer was lagging when registering for the McMaster FM interview slots and by the time I got on all of the January 18, 2019 spots were gone. I cannot make any other time (selected Sunday the 13th as that was all that's left) and am desperate for that date. Does anyone who is not in dire needs of the specific January 18 time slot for McMaster FM willing to trade with me? I would really appreciate it. Best wishes, - G
  7. I'm in a difficult situation and really need help from members of PM101 My computer was lagging when registering for the McMaster FM interview slots and by the time I got on all of the January 18, 2019 spots were gone. I cannot make any other time (selected Sunday the 13th as that was all that's left) and am desperate for that date. Does anyone who is not in dire needs of the specific January 18 time slot for McMaster FM willing to trade with me? I would really appreciate it. Best wishes, - G
  8. Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 17) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7), Ottawa(Dec 8), Memorial(Dec 12), Western (Dec 12), Dalhousie (Dec 14), McMaster (Dec 17), Montreal (17dec), Queens (Dec 18) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4), UBC (Dec 13), Toronto (Dec 17),Ottawa (Dec 18) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Western (Dec 12), MUN (Dec 13), Toronto (Dec 17) Emergency Medicine: Queen's (Dec 11), McMaster IMG (Dec 18) Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4), Saskatchewan (Prince Albert - Dec 10, Moose Jaw/Swift Current - Dec 13th, Saskatoon - Dec 13th), UofT (Dec 12), Sherbrooke (Dec 12) , McGill (Gatineau - Dec 13), Alberta Rural (Dec 12), Alberta Urban (Dec 14), UBC (Dec 14), McGill (Montreal - Dec 14) Queens (Dec 17), McMaster (Dec 17), Memorial (Dec 18), Ottawa (Dec 18), Calgary (Dec 18) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 11), McMaster (Dec 13)  General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3), Sherbrooke (Dec 12), Toronto (Dec 17), Manitoba (Dec 17), UBC (Dec 17) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: To be announced on January 3rd Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29), Manitoba (Nov 28), Ottawa (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 14) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 11), Memorial (Dec 12), Alberta (Dec 14), UofS (Dec 17) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary(Dec 4), McMaster (Dec 7), McGill (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 11), Ottawa (Dec 14) Neuropathology: Western (Dec 11), UBC (Dec 13), U of T (Dec 14) Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov30), Western (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 10), UBC (Dec12), McGill (Dec 12), Toronto (Dec 17), Ottawa (Dec 17), Alberta (Dec 17) Nuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke (Dec 07), Western (Dec 17) Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Manitoba (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 11), UBC (Dec 12), Toronto (Dec 17), Western (Dec 18), Queens (Dec 18), Dalhousie (Dec 18), Saskatoon/Regina (Dec 18)  Ophthalmology: UBC (Dec 4), Western (Dec 10), Alberta (Dec 11), Manitoba (Dec 14), McGill (Dec 17), Saskatchewan (Dec 18) Orthopaedic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 7), McGill (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 14), McMaster (Dec 14), Dalhousie (Dec 12) Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6), UofT (Dec 14), Calgary (Dec 14), Manitoba (Dec 17) Pediatrics: McMaster (Dec. 14, IMG), Western (Dec 14, IMG), UBC (Dec 14, IMG), Ottawa (Dec. 14, IMG), Toronto (Dec.14, IMG), Sask (Dec 18), Ottawa (Dec 18), Toronto (Dec 18), UBC (Dec 18), Alberta (Dec 18), Manitoba (Dec 18), Western (Dec 18) Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4), Manitoba (Dec 11), Laval (Dec 17), McGill (Dec 18), Western (Dec 18) PM&R: Queens (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30), Western (December6), UofT (December 12th), Calgary (December 12th), USask (Dec 6), Alberta (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 13)  Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7), Ottawa (Dec 7), Alberta (Dec 10), NOSM (Dec 11), Queens (Dec 12), USask-Regina (Dec 12), UBC (Dec 12), USask-Saskatoon (Dec 13),Dalhousie (Dec 13), U de M (Dec 14) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), NOSM (Dec 12) UofT (Dec12), Ottawa (Dec 13) Queens (Dec 17), Calgary (Dec 18) Radiation Oncology: Calgary (December 10), Alberta (Dec 11), UBC (Dec 11), Ottawa (Dec 17), Dalhousie (Dec 17), Manitoba (Dec 17), Western (Dec 17) Urology: Western (Dec 4), Dalhousie (Dec 5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6), Toronto (Dec 8), McGill (Dec 12) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26), Western (Dec 10)
  9. Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7), Ottawa(Dec 8), Memorial(Dec 12) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10) Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4), Saskatchewan (Prince Albert - Dec 10) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 11) General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3), Sherbrooke (Dec 12) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 11) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), McMaster (Dec 7), UBC (Dec 11) Neuropathology: Western (Dec 11) Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30), Western (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 10) Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Manitoba (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 11) Ophthalmology: Western (Dec 10), Alberta (Dec 11) Orthopaedic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 7), McGill (Dec 10) Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6) Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4), Manitoba (Dec 11) PM&R: Queens University (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30), Western (December 6), UofT (December 12th), Calgary (December 12th)  Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7), Ottawa (Dec 7), Alberta (Dec 10), NOSM (Dec 11) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), NOSM (Dec 12) Radiation Oncology: Calgary (December 10), Alberta (Dec 11) Urology: Western (Dec4), Dalhousie (Dec5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6), Toronto (Dec 8) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26), Western (Dec 10)
  10. Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7), Ottawa(Dec 8) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3) General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 10) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10) Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30), Western (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 10) Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Manitoba (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 10) Ophthalmology: Orthopaedic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 7) Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6) Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4) PM&R: Queens University (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30), Western (December 6)  Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7), Ottawa (Dec 7), Alberta (Dec 10) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Radiation Oncology: Calgary (December 10) Urology: Western (Dec 4), Dalhousie (Dec5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6), Toronto (Dec 8) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26), Western (Dec 10) As a side note please be careful when copy pasting old posts with missing schools as it cascades down. Best wishes.
  11. Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7) Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3) General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec 3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary (Dec 4) Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30) Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Ophthalmology: Orthopaedic Surgery: Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6) Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4) PM&R: Queens University (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30) Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7) Radiation Oncology: Urology: Western (Dec 4), Dalhousie (Dec 5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6)  Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26)
  12. I totally agree with you that there's a lot of work that needs to be done also to hone our clinical medicine... I for one have no intention of losing my clinical training even in an MOH role in the future.... I know for a number of students it's probably not something they are interested in... I also see a lot of physicians after their training want to do more and pursue public health oriented activities when they see the same patient return repeatedly because they can't afford their meds, or they struggle with addictions, etc.... There's obviously a responsibility for medical schools to teach as much clinical medicine as possible, but I find that the amount of students that roll their eyes around public health education to be disheartening. And to be completely honest... not everyone wants to do inpatient work after graduating medicine. Anyways I think I'm probably talking too much about this topic and people are already rolling their eyes at me. I'll leave this topic alone for now. - G
  13. It's been that way for at least 4 years... I was a verifier as well and had that email that also asked me about the person's quality. - G
  14. No I get that point as well... just in practice I see a lot of docs just scoff at public health or think that good public health practice is just referring someone to a social worker and be done with it... To balance the health inequity that contributes to patients repeatedly visiting the ER or being readmitted over and over again... there's so much we all can do and I'd argue that helping with disposition is as critical as managing their physical ailments. Even physicians getting better at utilizing or having knowledge of different services available in the community can be a big help for patients. Another is putting some more emphasis on the social history beyond substance use. Just my pet peeve and I doubt I'd really change anyone's opinion here but I do hope that with our privileged position we also try to be better engaged with the community for the better... we are capable of a lot for the preservation and improvement of our nation's longevity. - G
  15. I get where people are coming from and to be fair that kind of shows in what you're practicing now... ofc those interested in internal or surgery will be less interested in PHPM related topics and societal aspects of medicine while those in a primary care setting (and to some extent psych and EM) may care more... but honestly the attitudes reflected here honestly suggests that these topics are less important or not medicine... which isn't true when physicians play a big role in societal change and influencing future health in our communities. I mean I'm not saying everyone should be MOH's but still... the level of apathy towards these important social topics is disheartening... - G
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