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chiynadoll

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Everything posted by chiynadoll

  1. (Didn't read past the OP's first post, sorry if this has been said). Unfortunately you can't ask UBC to add an algorithm to change values of grades from every single different school/combination of schools. Every medical school is trying their best to admit their students according to their values. If you can't make it in UBC's requirements, check out another school. (Im from BC but somehow always got an interview at Queens and not UBC until my final application). Side note: My SO had the equivalent of 86% ish average at McGill, but 85+ is 4.0 there, and that coverts back to UBC's scale as a 92%. I'm IP, from UBC, and had to use my relatively sad 85%. It's hard to evaluate when everyone uses different scales too.
  2. If there is anything I learned in my first year, whatever timelines the faculty gives us for releasing their work, is never on time, but whatever deadlines they have for us to submit work is very very strict.... :/
  3. Doesn't hurt to apply. The fee is less than $100. UBC also doesn't ask for reference letters until you receive an interview in the winter. You just have space to write a bit more in UBC's text boxes than OMSAS.
  4. I tried for 5 cycles. 4 applications, I didn't make MCAT cutoffs the first application. I echo what everyone above said. I graduated, worked as a clinical research coordinator for 2 years, and just moved on with life. I met my current partner, started playing in recreational sports more, volunteered at a cat shelter because I liked furbabies, and worked on other hobbies. I always had medicine as my goal, but you can't just work on it 100% all the time.
  5. Can't say for other schools, but UBC uses Examplify as well. UBC's examplify does not support ipad use though (at least for this year). It is mandatory for us to have a laptop or surface. in our (bring your own device) policy, we need to have a laptop or similar as primary device, not just a tablet. I'm a mac user, so I can only give my thoughts on macs as I haven't used a PC in 6 years. I currently run a 2014 macbook air and a 2019 ipad pro (along with other apple products, they just link together seamlessly). I bought the pro only because my laptop is old, but it is honestly overkill. If you're looking to just handwrite notes, I recommend an ipad air + laptop. The writing experience on the ipad I feel is nicer than on surface products IMO, but it doesn't differ enough you have other concerns such as pricing, or compatibility. I strongly agree with @bumbleb33 on the extra monitor though! Its so much easier to work with extra screens. I have 1 extra monitor + the ipad, the partner uses 2 extra monitors and honestly it saves us so much time and effort when working with multiple documents.
  6. I highly agree with this! For lectures and most small group stuff (that does not have a tutor/preceptor and is not clinical skills or in front of patients/volunteer patients) I've been in normal casual clothes. I literally live in leggings and athleisure. For more business casual outfits, my favorite dress shirts are the $20 ones from H&M, with the tapered waist. Otherwise I typically pair a cheap cardigan with some ok looking tank/blouse you can get at Dynamite and related stores. If you have the money to spend, my fiance loves Lululemon's Commission pants, and my favorites are the On the Fly pants (more casual), and the On the move (?) trousers. There was also another older version that looked even more professional than those two but I think it got discontinued from Lulu's line and kept on Kit and Ace's line. Kit and Ace is a good investment if you find good sales. I wouldn't spend the money on either brand at full price though! Its definitely not necessary. You need 2 outfits, tops! You can always start building up the clothing collection over time, but don't spend too much money, and dont sacrifice comfort for looks.
  7. More recent activities are better IMO, but it doesn't hurt if you have extra space, or if you're just younger and have had less time to build up a list of activities. Between 2 years that I applied, and I didn't change any activities or how I wrote them (horrible idea btw), my scores went down. Overtime I replaced my high school activities with more recent ones. I strongly agree with OP, that how you write it really makes an impact on the app!
  8. I voted in the poll a few months back. There was two types of yellow/orange shades, a raspberry pink (I think...) and grey.
  9. As what @FrenchPress quoted, but don't treat it as a true buffer/hard cutoff. It's not worth losing a potential admission for, AND in the event you don't get the acceptance to begin with, you want that GPA to apply for next cycle. I don't know if anyone who lost an acceptance because of their now lower GPA for UBC Medicine specifically, but I do personally know of some undergrads who had their UBC Science admission offer revoked. I don't mean to stress you out, but I wouldn't get too relaxed until you actually start in August.
  10. Don't worry about it at all. If one bank wants anything more from you other than an acceptance letter/ proof of registration, go to a different bank. Medical students are almost guaranteed an LOC unless you have a horrifyingly bad credit score/credit history.
  11. I used a parent for my sports involvement and a sibling for a different entry. Last possible resort but it’s not an automatic fail if you do. I gave the international number, and email for my international verifier and he spoke next to no English. For schools that send automated emails requiring him to select yes/no or provide detail, he used an online translator. Not sure how accurate that was. He didn’t get a call from omsas though. (Although none of my verifiers did)
  12. I'd use your best judgment, if it's just a club activity without a significant leadership role, little hours committed, or didn't really carry through to university, I'd leave it out. But if you're applying in 2nd-year university and just don't have much to write, it doesn't really hurt you, it's just boring to read as a reviewer. I had one award from high school that I listed because it was a provincial championship and I had space, but nothing else. Instead I filled my NAQ with random lifestyle activities instead (I graduated high school in 2012, it's just too long ago).
  13. I know it's nerve-wracking but I didn't get the "class is full" email until July 11 last year. It may be another 2-3 weeks so don't hold your breath, but don't lose all hope either! Good luck!
  14. All schools will have access to all MCATs that you chose to have scored. You don't get to pick and choose which one they use for your application. The schools generally pick the one that works best in your favor as long as its before their deadline.
  15. They're currently offering $300 for opening a scotia one chequing account ( which would come with the LOC if you're new to scotia) if you just want cash.
  16. TBH if you feel like you can get a solid 128-129 in CARS, write it. Worst case scenario, spend some money and write it again. While the schools do get to see all MCAT attempts, there are also plenty of applicants who have written it multiple times. You just need to make it above cutoffs for the science sections for most schools.
  17. You have to download it from SSC after you register for courses. It gets generated automatically by the system after you've registered. I went with TD. Already approved and released. TBH though I think it depends on the advisor. If they have experience with UBC, they'll know that we don't get a proof of enrollment letter until mid-July, unlike some other schools. I didn't have to provide any additional info other than my offer letter email.
  18. Definitely add it, but be careful with how you phrase it. "This happened, this was the impact, this is how I've learned to deal with it, this is how I have overcome it and so it will not be a problem in the future" is how I worded my situation, but as concise as I could, without extra filler. You *are asking for sympathy, for their understanding that you had a valid reason for that year's grades and that it does not accurately represent your capabilities. However, you also want to demonstrate that it's not something that will continue to drag you down in med school (even if it can) Similar boat, both parents with ongoing chronic illnesses. Good luck!
  19. Can't help with recommendations since I'm not in Toronto, but if you find someone who is experienced with medical student LOCs, yes, they can get it done in around 2 weeks and find you all the perks you qualify for. My guy did it for me through texts and digging through my very very old client file at TD over the weekend. I was approved within one week, access in 10 days. They're just not going entirely by the book and know which loopholes to go through.
  20. The waitlist is still moving guys. Just got a phone call from the admissions office 5 minutes ago. Will likely be turning it down, but am going to sleep on it before I make a final decision. Edit. Declined offer June 10.
  21. It's not open for the next cycle yet. It'll prompt you to create a new application for this cycle when you first 'register'. Give it a couple of weeks.
  22. Honestly, it doesn't hurt you to apply (other than having to pay a little bit, notify verifiers, and spending time on the app. You don't need references until the interview stage). They don't care about a number of previous applications (or even MCAT attempts LOL, I'm 5 cycles in, 4 MCAT attempts). I regret not applying the first year I was eligible, 2 of my best friends who had very similar, if not slightly lower stats got into med school and are now PGY1 and 2... and I'm pre-MSI1 so yeah... It took many more years than I expected to get in. If you just finished 2nd year and are going into 3rd, worst case is that you go back to school to finish your 4th year. If you're 3rd going into 4th, worst case, you take a gap year. Waiting to apply just to have a better app later really imo is letting time pass you by. You are guaranteeing yourself to not get in the next year and to have to spend another year applying. However, if you don't get in this cycle, you can see where you're able to improve vs going in blindly next cycle. Also, as I've been pretty much preaching on the forums, the writing style is HUGE for getting you NAQ points. I've done less than you have in non-paid exp for sure, and probably put in less total time as well. Never made it past pre-interview cutoffs until this year and my entries didn't change, just the way I wrote them. If you have the time right now, and friends who are willing to proofread, focus on making sure that the writing accurately reflects what you did, but also sells you.
  23. That's good to know, I couldn't get anything from BMO until I had proof of registration so I jumped ship to TD.
  24. Depending on your advisor, some of them can help you bend the rules and submit the applications with just an offer letter and confirmation of paid-deposit. I'm going with TD and my advisor just submitted everything for me today to try and get the $400-value promo they have for one of their premium cards. It's do-able, just hunt around for the right advisor.
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