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chiynadoll

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  1. Haha
    chiynadoll got a reaction from lostnconfused in Any idea when OAS opens?   
    If there is anything I learned in my first year, whatever timelines the faculty gives us for releasing their work, is never on time, but whatever deadlines they have for us to submit work is very very strict.... 
    :/
  2. Haha
    chiynadoll got a reaction from drager in Any idea when OAS opens?   
    If there is anything I learned in my first year, whatever timelines the faculty gives us for releasing their work, is never on time, but whatever deadlines they have for us to submit work is very very strict.... 
    :/
  3. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from sorrynotsorry in Is the system fair?   
    (Didn't read past the OP's first post, sorry if this has been said). 
    Unfortunately you can't ask UBC to add an algorithm to change values of grades from every single different school/combination of schools. Every medical school is trying their best to admit their students according to their values. If you can't make it in UBC's requirements, check out another school. (Im from BC but somehow always got an interview at Queens and not UBC until my final application). 
    Side note: My SO had the equivalent of 86% ish average at McGill, but 85+ is 4.0 there, and that coverts back to UBC's scale as a 92%. I'm IP, from UBC, and had to use my relatively sad 85%. It's hard to evaluate when everyone uses different scales too. 
  4. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Dr. Shqipe in Chances as an OOP Ontario Applicant   
    Doesn't hurt to apply. The fee is less than $100. UBC also doesn't ask for reference letters until you receive an interview in the winter. You just have space to write a bit more in UBC's text boxes than OMSAS. 
  5. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from HongHongHong in Laptop for Med School   
    Can't say for other schools, but UBC uses Examplify as well. 
    UBC's examplify does not support ipad use though (at least for this year). It is mandatory for us to have a laptop or surface. in our (bring your own device) policy, we need to have a laptop or similar as primary device, not just a tablet. 
    I'm a mac user, so I can only give my thoughts on macs as I haven't used a PC in 6 years. I currently run a 2014 macbook air and a 2019 ipad pro (along with other apple products, they just link together seamlessly). I bought the pro only because my laptop is old, but it is honestly overkill. If you're looking to just handwrite notes, I recommend an ipad air + laptop. The writing experience on the ipad I feel is nicer than on surface products IMO, but it doesn't differ enough you have other concerns such as pricing, or compatibility. 
    I strongly agree with @bumbleb33 on the extra monitor though! Its so much easier to work with extra screens. I have 1 extra monitor + the ipad, the partner uses 2 extra monitors and honestly it saves us so much time and effort when working with multiple documents.
  6. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Kaboom in Laptop for Med School   
    Can't say for other schools, but UBC uses Examplify as well. 
    UBC's examplify does not support ipad use though (at least for this year). It is mandatory for us to have a laptop or surface. in our (bring your own device) policy, we need to have a laptop or similar as primary device, not just a tablet. 
    I'm a mac user, so I can only give my thoughts on macs as I haven't used a PC in 6 years. I currently run a 2014 macbook air and a 2019 ipad pro (along with other apple products, they just link together seamlessly). I bought the pro only because my laptop is old, but it is honestly overkill. If you're looking to just handwrite notes, I recommend an ipad air + laptop. The writing experience on the ipad I feel is nicer than on surface products IMO, but it doesn't differ enough you have other concerns such as pricing, or compatibility. 
    I strongly agree with @bumbleb33 on the extra monitor though! Its so much easier to work with extra screens. I have 1 extra monitor + the ipad, the partner uses 2 extra monitors and honestly it saves us so much time and effort when working with multiple documents.
  7. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from ShadesofCyan in Reapplying to med schools multiple times?   
    I tried for 5 cycles. 4 applications, I didn't make MCAT cutoffs the first application. 
    I echo what everyone above said. I graduated, worked as a clinical research coordinator for 2 years, and just moved on with life. I met my current partner, started playing in recreational sports more, volunteered at a cat shelter because I liked furbabies, and worked on other hobbies. I always had medicine as my goal, but you can't just work on it 100% all the time. 
     
  8. Sad
    chiynadoll got a reaction from ChemPetE in Laptop for Med School   
    Can't say for other schools, but UBC uses Examplify as well. 
    UBC's examplify does not support ipad use though (at least for this year). It is mandatory for us to have a laptop or surface. in our (bring your own device) policy, we need to have a laptop or similar as primary device, not just a tablet. 
    I'm a mac user, so I can only give my thoughts on macs as I haven't used a PC in 6 years. I currently run a 2014 macbook air and a 2019 ipad pro (along with other apple products, they just link together seamlessly). I bought the pro only because my laptop is old, but it is honestly overkill. If you're looking to just handwrite notes, I recommend an ipad air + laptop. The writing experience on the ipad I feel is nicer than on surface products IMO, but it doesn't differ enough you have other concerns such as pricing, or compatibility. 
    I strongly agree with @bumbleb33 on the extra monitor though! Its so much easier to work with extra screens. I have 1 extra monitor + the ipad, the partner uses 2 extra monitors and honestly it saves us so much time and effort when working with multiple documents.
  9. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from chxiel in Reapplying to med schools multiple times?   
    I tried for 5 cycles. 4 applications, I didn't make MCAT cutoffs the first application. 
    I echo what everyone above said. I graduated, worked as a clinical research coordinator for 2 years, and just moved on with life. I met my current partner, started playing in recreational sports more, volunteered at a cat shelter because I liked furbabies, and worked on other hobbies. I always had medicine as my goal, but you can't just work on it 100% all the time. 
     
  10. Like
    chiynadoll reacted to WhiteCoat4BlackLives in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    After creeping around the forums for years I'm so glad I finally get to post one of these!
    Timestamp: 11:56 AM PST
    Result: Accepted - VFMP (1st choice )
    Early or Regular Deadline: Regular
    AGPA: 85.1 (not the strongest so I do feel a bit sheepish seeing some of the incredible stats for some who weren't successful this attempt)
    MCAT: 513- 127/129/127/130
    Year: 2011 Undergrad. 2013 Masters. Non-traditional student. 
    ECs: A lot of work experience and extracurriculars, some typical and others not, but generally long term and service oriented. Coordinated programs for university -level international and refugee students. Coordinated multi-faith programs, did some mentorship programs in uni, danced for three years recreationally, sang in community choirs for 5, involved in student government throughout my undergrad, sat on the boards for 2 non-profits, taught sunday school for 8 years, was a TA during my masters, volunteered and worked at summer camps, volunteered at a retirement home for 2 years, volunteered at an AIDS service organization, did an international medical volunteer trip, currently coordinate a large HIV research study and more.

    Geography: IP (but I only moved to BC for my job in 2016)
     
    Interview:  I felt generally good with the interview. I think I put my best foot forward in every room and If I wasn't sure about something I said so. A couple stations tripped me up for sure but that's to be expected. But considering my GPA, I'm thinking my interview along with my references was my saving grace.


    This was my 3rd time applying for medical school and first time at UBC and first interview. The past application cycle was harrowing as I only applied to UBC knowing full well how risky it was to put all my eggs in one basket. But I also understood that it was realistically my best shot given my GPA. From being an international student struggling with being away from home among other things, failing a course, having to work 3 jobs during my masters because of international fees and taking almost any job that came my way so I could make ends meet to applying for a job across the country after failing to get a job in Ontario, this has been quite the journey and I'm so glad I finally made it. To anyone doubting themselves, don't. Be realistic about your odds and always strive to improve your stats each cycle. Also do things that you truly enjoy (not things just for your application) because that's where your true potential comes out. And if things aren't exactly what you hope for them to be, that's okay. Bloom where you are planted...the world has a way of working to fit around you.
    Congratulations to everyone who made it and can't wait to meet you all later this year!!
  11. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from videoath in UofT Interview Invites/Regrets 2019   
    TIME STAMP: 2:50PM PST March 19th, 2019
    Interview Date: Apr 7, 2019
    Result: Interview (MD)
    cGPA:  3.75
    wGPA: 3.8-ish (I don't really know how to calculate, UBC does percentages and counts credits differently)
    MCAT: 522 (131/128/132/131, after many retests...)
    ECs: PM me, or dig through my old posts. Variety of things, some long term but mostly entry-level service-industry jobs, some random gigs, and basic level clinical research work. 2 abstracts, 1 undergrad thesis, no pubs otherwise. Some sports, but not competitive. 
    Essays: tbh I wrote them the night before they were due. I absolutely hated writing the essays each year, it was like pulling teeth... I also have received rejects every year right around this time so I kinda went into essay writing thinking it was futile (I pretty much only did the rest of OMSAS because I was already applying for Queens) To anyone reading this - I do not recommend doing that. I did, however, relate each prompt to my personal story, life, experiences and lessons learned and perhaps this year's prompts allowed me to relate, and thus write, better.
    OOP, BSc 2017 
  12. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from mdforme in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Don't worry about it at all. If one bank wants anything more from you other than an acceptance letter/ proof of registration, go to a different bank. 
    Medical students are almost guaranteed an LOC unless you have a horrifyingly bad credit score/credit history.
  13. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from LostLamb in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Don't worry about it at all. If one bank wants anything more from you other than an acceptance letter/ proof of registration, go to a different bank. 
    Medical students are almost guaranteed an LOC unless you have a horrifyingly bad credit score/credit history.
  14. Thanks
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Maggie19 in Verifier out of country or does not speak English   
    I used a parent for my sports involvement and a sibling for a different entry. Last possible resort but it’s not an automatic fail if you do. 
    I gave the international number, and email for my international verifier and he spoke next to no English. For schools that send automated emails requiring him to select yes/no or provide detail, he used an online translator. Not sure how accurate that was. He didn’t get a call from omsas though. (Although none of my verifiers did)
  15. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from cookiemonster233 in Queens Interview Invites/regrets 2019   
    I second this! My first 2 MCATs were 31/45 on the old one, and didn't make cutoffs for ANY school, including UBC in province (which currently has an IP cutoff of 500 if I'm not mistaken). Now at 522. Whether you studied, gave it your all, had issues come up around the time of the exam, mental/physical health, etc. really plays a role in your performance. 
    Result: Invite
    Interview Date: Second weekend. I'm out of the continent on the first.
    wGPA/cGPA: 3.85
    Year: Finished undergrad, now working
    MCAT: 131/128/132/131 -> 522 
    ECs: Message me or find an old post of mine where I went in to detail. Very diverse, random, and filled with hobby related entries. 
    Geography: OOP (although I vaguely remember theres no IP/OOP distinction)
  16. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Passion_Fruit in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Result: Waitlisted - (Accepted June 6, phone call 10 am PDT)
    Timestamp: May 14th 6:13 AM PST
    wGPA: 3.8
    MCAT: 522
    ECs: See other posts or PM for details. Pretty pre-med average, but also some random entries. Used extraneous circumstances box. 
    Brief Personal Essays: Wrote them the night before they were due because I've been rejected pre-interview from Toronto for 3 years now that I just didn't feel confident. 
    
Interview: Felt like I did well on 2, just ok on the other 2. 
    Year: HBSc 2017. 
     
  17. Sad
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Borat Sagdiyev in Waitlist Thread 2019   
    I know it's nerve-wracking but I didn't get the "class is full" email until July 11 last year. 
    It may be another 2-3 weeks so don't hold your breath, but don't lose all hope either! 
    Good luck!
  18. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Cyanlater in Waitlist Thread 2019   
    I know it's nerve-wracking but I didn't get the "class is full" email until July 11 last year. 
    It may be another 2-3 weeks so don't hold your breath, but don't lose all hope either! 
    Good luck!
  19. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from canada747 in LOC proof of enrollment   
    You have to download it from SSC after you register for courses. It gets generated automatically by the system after you've registered. 
    I went with TD. Already approved and released. 
    TBH though I think it depends on the advisor. If they have experience with UBC, they'll know that we don't get a proof of enrollment letter until mid-July, unlike some other schools. I didn't have to provide any additional info other than my offer letter email. 
  20. Thanks
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Ss123toy in Exceptional Circumstances   
    Definitely add it, but be careful with how you phrase it. 
    "This happened, this was the impact, this is how I've learned to deal with it, this is how I have overcome it and so it will not be a problem in the future" is how I worded my situation, but as concise as I could, without extra filler. You *are asking for sympathy, for their understanding that you had a valid reason for that year's grades and that it does not accurately represent your capabilities. However, you also want to demonstrate that it's not something that will continue to drag you down in med school (even if it can) Similar boat, both parents with ongoing chronic illnesses. Good luck!
  21. Thanks
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Neurophiliac in LOC proof of enrollment   
    You have to download it from SSC after you register for courses. It gets generated automatically by the system after you've registered. 
    I went with TD. Already approved and released. 
    TBH though I think it depends on the advisor. If they have experience with UBC, they'll know that we don't get a proof of enrollment letter until mid-July, unlike some other schools. I didn't have to provide any additional info other than my offer letter email. 
  22. Thanks
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Premed_Girl in Lines of Credit for Medical Students (Scotia is the best option)   
    Can't help with recommendations since I'm not in Toronto, but if you find someone who is experienced with medical student LOCs, yes, they can get it done in around 2 weeks and find you all the perks you qualify for. My guy did it for me through texts and digging through my very very old client file at TD over the weekend. I was approved within one week, access in 10 days. 
    They're just not going entirely by the book and know which loopholes to go through. 
  23. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Bluecolorisnice in Where are you at underprivileged population?   
    You just do, and you come out stronger because you are more resilient,  you can handle the stresses of med school/not getting what you want all the time/ being tired/ multitasking life and work and everything else that gets thrown at you/ and managing someone else's life on top of yours vs someone else who had everything handed to them on a silver platter.
    It took me 5 cycles of trying to get in but I'm happy to finally start med school this fall. I also am fortunate to have met others who have faced the struggle, and tbh I think we're a stronger batch of students because of it. We have real-life experience - not just from textbooks. You'll need to develop a thicker skin to make and build those connections/contacts/opportunities - but again that will help you develop character too. A part of me is salty that I had to go this route - but a part of me is happy that I now have better skills than before to do so. The salt doesn't really ever go away though, but I've learned to just move on from it. 
    For reference, I've worked 2-3 part-time jobs since I was 12 to supplement family income, commuted 4 hours/day to university for undergrad on top of said jobs, dealt with a chronic debilitating illness with both of my parents (heart failure/brain tumors), and had my entire family and extended family remind me every month over the last 3 years that I should probably get married and settle for a base living wage job instead of being a doctor because I'm getting "old" and should pop out a grandchild soon. Not to compare, but to be somewhat of a "success" story. Life isn't fair, but you make the most of what you have to be the person you wish to be, and the experiences you gain in the process are invaluable.
    Also - if anything - I've taught the s/o quite a few bits and pieces about life as well. He grew up much more privileged than I, and thus, missed out on some basic life lessons that you would only learn from having minimum wage customer service jobs for half your life. Your patients are more likely to be middle/lower class, its easier to relate and empathize when you have gone through it - than to "imagine the how hard it must be to work in manual labor". 
    Good luck!
     
     
     
     
  24. Like
    chiynadoll got a reaction from Peaka in Where are you at underprivileged population?   
    You just do, and you come out stronger because you are more resilient,  you can handle the stresses of med school/not getting what you want all the time/ being tired/ multitasking life and work and everything else that gets thrown at you/ and managing someone else's life on top of yours vs someone else who had everything handed to them on a silver platter.
    It took me 5 cycles of trying to get in but I'm happy to finally start med school this fall. I also am fortunate to have met others who have faced the struggle, and tbh I think we're a stronger batch of students because of it. We have real-life experience - not just from textbooks. You'll need to develop a thicker skin to make and build those connections/contacts/opportunities - but again that will help you develop character too. A part of me is salty that I had to go this route - but a part of me is happy that I now have better skills than before to do so. The salt doesn't really ever go away though, but I've learned to just move on from it. 
    For reference, I've worked 2-3 part-time jobs since I was 12 to supplement family income, commuted 4 hours/day to university for undergrad on top of said jobs, dealt with a chronic debilitating illness with both of my parents (heart failure/brain tumors), and had my entire family and extended family remind me every month over the last 3 years that I should probably get married and settle for a base living wage job instead of being a doctor because I'm getting "old" and should pop out a grandchild soon. Not to compare, but to be somewhat of a "success" story. Life isn't fair, but you make the most of what you have to be the person you wish to be, and the experiences you gain in the process are invaluable.
    Also - if anything - I've taught the s/o quite a few bits and pieces about life as well. He grew up much more privileged than I, and thus, missed out on some basic life lessons that you would only learn from having minimum wage customer service jobs for half your life. Your patients are more likely to be middle/lower class, its easier to relate and empathize when you have gone through it - than to "imagine the how hard it must be to work in manual labor". 
    Good luck!
     
     
     
     
  25. Like
    chiynadoll reacted to struggling2getin in What happens after accepting the offer?   
    CPSBC email / sign up should come this month I think
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