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Rorzo

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  1. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from meiosis in Medical Genetics   
    If you don't end up finding a resident, I had an excellent elective with Dr. Murray Potter at Mac who was more than happy to go over all of those logistical things while I was with him. From what I can recall the job market was pretty bad, and even when you find a job you're likely to be running a lab and doing a lot of QI instead of what most people imagine with medical genetics. 
  2. Like
    Rorzo reacted to LostLamb in prestige vs fit when ranking   
    FIT FIT FIT FIT FIT
    (catch my drift? 5 years is a long time)
  3. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Family Med CARMS Reference Letters   
    Use the people who can best advocate for you. Generally you can impress more in 4th year than 3rd, generally people will know you better over a core rather than an elective, generally family physicians can make a better case for you then specialists. But at the end of the day those are all generalities, if a 3rd year surgery elective preceptor connected with you it's going to be way more effective than a generic paragraph from a random family preceptor in 4th year.
    It gets suspicious if none of your strongest letters are from family preceptors,  but I promise you when someone is reading 30 letters in a row the content matters infinitely more than when or where you met the writer
  4. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Soon2BeMD in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  5. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from RPN-RN-MD in McMaster 1st year Medical Student - AMA   
    I guess I'll provide a dissenting opinion - I'm a second year resident now and I loved my time at Mac. Caveat being that I can't comment on curriculum changes or if anything else is different since I went there. 
    I was initially interested in a somewhat competitive specialty and while there weren't any summers McMaster clerkship was not typical clerkship. Around the necessary team based learning and professional competency sessions I was able to shadow for 10-20 hours per week, got involved in multiple research projects, and hung out with residents in the specialty at rounds etc. I ended up switching to family in the end based off of those experiences, which aside from MF5 gave me so much free time in pre-clerkship that even without designated breaks I didn't feel close to burn out. And there are people from my class who discovered late in preclerkship or early clerkship that they wanted something competitive and ended up matching to competitive specialties - I can't compare how easy it would have been for them to do it at a 4 year school but it certainly isn't as impossible as it's being made to seem in this thread. 
    That does not mean everything is positive, I do have multiple friends who ended up unmatched, matched to alternate specialties, or who taking a 4th year (which is an option) because they switched focus midway through clerkship. But even if you have an idea of med vs surg there is definitely time to find your niche if you set out to explore from the beginning. To address specific questions:
    -For public health the unit did a great elective where you could see what the MOH did, do research projects etc. I don't know the specifics but 2 people in our class matched CCFP+PHPM at very competitive (non-mac) programs. I did a lab medicine elective which gave exposure to not only path but med micro and med biochem, definitely not for me but the preceptors were incredibly helpful to anyone showing interest
    -If you want Derm, Mac is a bad idea. They don't really have a program, just a weird half UofT thing, can be hard to get non-academic exposure. If you want to see something more interesting than AKs and are ok dictating until midnight you can learn a lot at Dr. Lima's clinic though
    -A car in preclerkship will depend on your goals, I was able to live close to one hospital and bus in to Mac and had no problems without a car until preclerkship
    -Everyone got bursaries, giant list of additional ones that you could apply to got sent out as well
    -It seems that non-trad students flourished at MAc moreso than elsewhere. We had veterinarians, lawyers, architects, musicians and eventually everyone came out with a good knowledge base
    -You have to be self-directed in this program, it is very easy to just coast by. That being said, I recognized my own weaknesses, the school had ample resources to correct them, and I did really well on external electives and continue to do so in residency (I did get lucky with my clerkship stream as well and did almost all of my cores early - those who weren't able to do so felt much more uncomfortable). The individual will matter more than the school here in my opinion, but Mac certainly won't bring a competent student down
    Lastly the benefits of Mac. If you want something non-competitive you will have zero issues matching from Mac and I really don't see the value of the extra year of training. That will cost you 200k+ of staff money, probably 5 figures of tuition as the 4 year schools tuition inexplicably creep closer to Mac, and a year of living expenses whatever you budget that as. I hated lectures and the minutae that my friends at UofT were being forced to attend and tested on, and I instead got to spend that time researching, getting clinical exposure, and having fun. At the end of the day you have to know yourself because that program is definitely not for everyone, but it was my first choice going in and a couple years out doing residency at a 4 year school I would absolutely not want to go anywhere else in retrospect. Feel free to PM me questions as well, but if you feel comfortable please post them here as conversations like this were incredibly helpful for me when I was making my decision.
  6. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Persephone in McMaster 1st year Medical Student - AMA   
    I guess I'll provide a dissenting opinion - I'm a second year resident now and I loved my time at Mac. Caveat being that I can't comment on curriculum changes or if anything else is different since I went there. 
    I was initially interested in a somewhat competitive specialty and while there weren't any summers McMaster clerkship was not typical clerkship. Around the necessary team based learning and professional competency sessions I was able to shadow for 10-20 hours per week, got involved in multiple research projects, and hung out with residents in the specialty at rounds etc. I ended up switching to family in the end based off of those experiences, which aside from MF5 gave me so much free time in pre-clerkship that even without designated breaks I didn't feel close to burn out. And there are people from my class who discovered late in preclerkship or early clerkship that they wanted something competitive and ended up matching to competitive specialties - I can't compare how easy it would have been for them to do it at a 4 year school but it certainly isn't as impossible as it's being made to seem in this thread. 
    That does not mean everything is positive, I do have multiple friends who ended up unmatched, matched to alternate specialties, or who taking a 4th year (which is an option) because they switched focus midway through clerkship. But even if you have an idea of med vs surg there is definitely time to find your niche if you set out to explore from the beginning. To address specific questions:
    -For public health the unit did a great elective where you could see what the MOH did, do research projects etc. I don't know the specifics but 2 people in our class matched CCFP+PHPM at very competitive (non-mac) programs. I did a lab medicine elective which gave exposure to not only path but med micro and med biochem, definitely not for me but the preceptors were incredibly helpful to anyone showing interest
    -If you want Derm, Mac is a bad idea. They don't really have a program, just a weird half UofT thing, can be hard to get non-academic exposure. If you want to see something more interesting than AKs and are ok dictating until midnight you can learn a lot at Dr. Lima's clinic though
    -A car in preclerkship will depend on your goals, I was able to live close to one hospital and bus in to Mac and had no problems without a car until preclerkship
    -Everyone got bursaries, giant list of additional ones that you could apply to got sent out as well
    -It seems that non-trad students flourished at MAc moreso than elsewhere. We had veterinarians, lawyers, architects, musicians and eventually everyone came out with a good knowledge base
    -You have to be self-directed in this program, it is very easy to just coast by. That being said, I recognized my own weaknesses, the school had ample resources to correct them, and I did really well on external electives and continue to do so in residency (I did get lucky with my clerkship stream as well and did almost all of my cores early - those who weren't able to do so felt much more uncomfortable). The individual will matter more than the school here in my opinion, but Mac certainly won't bring a competent student down
    Lastly the benefits of Mac. If you want something non-competitive you will have zero issues matching from Mac and I really don't see the value of the extra year of training. That will cost you 200k+ of staff money, probably 5 figures of tuition as the 4 year schools tuition inexplicably creep closer to Mac, and a year of living expenses whatever you budget that as. I hated lectures and the minutae that my friends at UofT were being forced to attend and tested on, and I instead got to spend that time researching, getting clinical exposure, and having fun. At the end of the day you have to know yourself because that program is definitely not for everyone, but it was my first choice going in and a couple years out doing residency at a 4 year school I would absolutely not want to go anywhere else in retrospect. Feel free to PM me questions as well, but if you feel comfortable please post them here as conversations like this were incredibly helpful for me when I was making my decision.
  7. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from CoffeeOtter in McMaster 1st year Medical Student - AMA   
    I guess I'll provide a dissenting opinion - I'm a second year resident now and I loved my time at Mac. Caveat being that I can't comment on curriculum changes or if anything else is different since I went there. 
    I was initially interested in a somewhat competitive specialty and while there weren't any summers McMaster clerkship was not typical clerkship. Around the necessary team based learning and professional competency sessions I was able to shadow for 10-20 hours per week, got involved in multiple research projects, and hung out with residents in the specialty at rounds etc. I ended up switching to family in the end based off of those experiences, which aside from MF5 gave me so much free time in pre-clerkship that even without designated breaks I didn't feel close to burn out. And there are people from my class who discovered late in preclerkship or early clerkship that they wanted something competitive and ended up matching to competitive specialties - I can't compare how easy it would have been for them to do it at a 4 year school but it certainly isn't as impossible as it's being made to seem in this thread. 
    That does not mean everything is positive, I do have multiple friends who ended up unmatched, matched to alternate specialties, or who taking a 4th year (which is an option) because they switched focus midway through clerkship. But even if you have an idea of med vs surg there is definitely time to find your niche if you set out to explore from the beginning. To address specific questions:
    -For public health the unit did a great elective where you could see what the MOH did, do research projects etc. I don't know the specifics but 2 people in our class matched CCFP+PHPM at very competitive (non-mac) programs. I did a lab medicine elective which gave exposure to not only path but med micro and med biochem, definitely not for me but the preceptors were incredibly helpful to anyone showing interest
    -If you want Derm, Mac is a bad idea. They don't really have a program, just a weird half UofT thing, can be hard to get non-academic exposure. If you want to see something more interesting than AKs and are ok dictating until midnight you can learn a lot at Dr. Lima's clinic though
    -A car in preclerkship will depend on your goals, I was able to live close to one hospital and bus in to Mac and had no problems without a car until preclerkship
    -Everyone got bursaries, giant list of additional ones that you could apply to got sent out as well
    -It seems that non-trad students flourished at MAc moreso than elsewhere. We had veterinarians, lawyers, architects, musicians and eventually everyone came out with a good knowledge base
    -You have to be self-directed in this program, it is very easy to just coast by. That being said, I recognized my own weaknesses, the school had ample resources to correct them, and I did really well on external electives and continue to do so in residency (I did get lucky with my clerkship stream as well and did almost all of my cores early - those who weren't able to do so felt much more uncomfortable). The individual will matter more than the school here in my opinion, but Mac certainly won't bring a competent student down
    Lastly the benefits of Mac. If you want something non-competitive you will have zero issues matching from Mac and I really don't see the value of the extra year of training. That will cost you 200k+ of staff money, probably 5 figures of tuition as the 4 year schools tuition inexplicably creep closer to Mac, and a year of living expenses whatever you budget that as. I hated lectures and the minutae that my friends at UofT were being forced to attend and tested on, and I instead got to spend that time researching, getting clinical exposure, and having fun. At the end of the day you have to know yourself because that program is definitely not for everyone, but it was my first choice going in and a couple years out doing residency at a 4 year school I would absolutely not want to go anywhere else in retrospect. Feel free to PM me questions as well, but if you feel comfortable please post them here as conversations like this were incredibly helpful for me when I was making my decision.
  8. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from targaryen in McMaster 1st year Medical Student - AMA   
    I guess I'll provide a dissenting opinion - I'm a second year resident now and I loved my time at Mac. Caveat being that I can't comment on curriculum changes or if anything else is different since I went there. 
    I was initially interested in a somewhat competitive specialty and while there weren't any summers McMaster clerkship was not typical clerkship. Around the necessary team based learning and professional competency sessions I was able to shadow for 10-20 hours per week, got involved in multiple research projects, and hung out with residents in the specialty at rounds etc. I ended up switching to family in the end based off of those experiences, which aside from MF5 gave me so much free time in pre-clerkship that even without designated breaks I didn't feel close to burn out. And there are people from my class who discovered late in preclerkship or early clerkship that they wanted something competitive and ended up matching to competitive specialties - I can't compare how easy it would have been for them to do it at a 4 year school but it certainly isn't as impossible as it's being made to seem in this thread. 
    That does not mean everything is positive, I do have multiple friends who ended up unmatched, matched to alternate specialties, or who taking a 4th year (which is an option) because they switched focus midway through clerkship. But even if you have an idea of med vs surg there is definitely time to find your niche if you set out to explore from the beginning. To address specific questions:
    -For public health the unit did a great elective where you could see what the MOH did, do research projects etc. I don't know the specifics but 2 people in our class matched CCFP+PHPM at very competitive (non-mac) programs. I did a lab medicine elective which gave exposure to not only path but med micro and med biochem, definitely not for me but the preceptors were incredibly helpful to anyone showing interest
    -If you want Derm, Mac is a bad idea. They don't really have a program, just a weird half UofT thing, can be hard to get non-academic exposure. If you want to see something more interesting than AKs and are ok dictating until midnight you can learn a lot at Dr. Lima's clinic though
    -A car in preclerkship will depend on your goals, I was able to live close to one hospital and bus in to Mac and had no problems without a car until preclerkship
    -Everyone got bursaries, giant list of additional ones that you could apply to got sent out as well
    -It seems that non-trad students flourished at MAc moreso than elsewhere. We had veterinarians, lawyers, architects, musicians and eventually everyone came out with a good knowledge base
    -You have to be self-directed in this program, it is very easy to just coast by. That being said, I recognized my own weaknesses, the school had ample resources to correct them, and I did really well on external electives and continue to do so in residency (I did get lucky with my clerkship stream as well and did almost all of my cores early - those who weren't able to do so felt much more uncomfortable). The individual will matter more than the school here in my opinion, but Mac certainly won't bring a competent student down
    Lastly the benefits of Mac. If you want something non-competitive you will have zero issues matching from Mac and I really don't see the value of the extra year of training. That will cost you 200k+ of staff money, probably 5 figures of tuition as the 4 year schools tuition inexplicably creep closer to Mac, and a year of living expenses whatever you budget that as. I hated lectures and the minutae that my friends at UofT were being forced to attend and tested on, and I instead got to spend that time researching, getting clinical exposure, and having fun. At the end of the day you have to know yourself because that program is definitely not for everyone, but it was my first choice going in and a couple years out doing residency at a 4 year school I would absolutely not want to go anywhere else in retrospect. Feel free to PM me questions as well, but if you feel comfortable please post them here as conversations like this were incredibly helpful for me when I was making my decision.
  9. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from DeeplySuperficial in How to be a a competitive applicant   
    You should certainly know research methodology for family, however I don't think it's that relevant in being a competitive applicant. I can't speak for other schools, however at mine I reviewed some 20 family applications each of this year and last, and have seen 1 family medicine related research project in that entire time. You can be very competitive without it, and the  vast majority of applicants are. In residency, our research project can be a QI project as well, with lots of support working through it so it's not all that needed for the future either.
  10. Thanks
    Rorzo got a reaction from MDwannabe02 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  11. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Dr. Octavius in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  12. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from MMEDD3333 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  13. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from nice in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  14. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Neji3 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  15. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from criston in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  16. Thanks
    Rorzo got a reaction from brady23 in Endocrinologist Lack Of Info   
    OMA has billing data available on their site for all specialties if you're a member. 
  17. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from HappyAndHopeful in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  18. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from heydere in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  19. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from CanPreMed2018 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  20. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Dr_dreaming in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  21. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from King74 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    Family medicine, and job offers will come up in residency. Part of the reason I ended up in family is that you have so much flexibility. Once you're staff, the only barriers you have to work around are the ones you put up yourself. Don't want to take call? Don't want to work Tuesdays? Never want to run a clinic? That's all your choice, yeah it will limit your job options and salary potential, but you're the boss and there's nothing stopping you from putting yourself in a situation you want to be in
  22. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from King74 in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  23. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Birdy in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    Family medicine, and job offers will come up in residency. Part of the reason I ended up in family is that you have so much flexibility. Once you're staff, the only barriers you have to work around are the ones you put up yourself. Don't want to take call? Don't want to work Tuesdays? Never want to run a clinic? That's all your choice, yeah it will limit your job options and salary potential, but you're the boss and there's nothing stopping you from putting yourself in a situation you want to be in
  24. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from mew in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  25. Like
    Rorzo got a reaction from Egg_McMuffin in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
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