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fugacity

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fugacity last won the day on November 17 2014

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About fugacity

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  1. fugacity

    The Carms Algorithm

    Indeed, this means that there is absolutely no reason for you to rank a school you do not like higher simply because you feel that the chances are better. In this case, it did not matter where Tom ranked Toronto: he was not going to go unmatched, regardless of where he ranked Toronto.
  2. fugacity

    2017 Carms Applicants

    As an UBC student, our MSPR contains minimal information (e.g. no comments from rotations) and we do not have honours as far as our transcript goes. Will make CaRMS a great adventure
  3. fugacity

    2017 Carms Applicants

    For a school like NOSM (remote, limited number of spots, new program), they are probably similar to rural family medicine program in their selection criteria. My uneducated guess is that they probably value dedication to the site/program a significant amount (possibly more than performance, which is best addressed by reference letters).
  4. Hi All, I have a question regarding what to do in the OR. A bit about myself, I am a 3rd year student aiming for anesthesia and I am doing anesthesia electives. However, so often I run out of things to talk about. There's the typical what drew you to anesthesia, how this patient's PMHX affects anesthesia etc. But so many times I run out of questions and there's a moment of silence, and the staff pulls his phone out and we are pretty much done for the rest of the day. It isn't good for my learning, it for sure isn't good to get a reference letter this way. What are some good things to ask about in the OR? How do I sound smart when I ask questions? I know these seem like basic questions that MS3's should know, but I am not the most eloquent med student. Any help would be appreciated! Best, fugacity
  5. Congratulations to all those accepted to UBC Medicine Class of 2020! You have worked so hard for this, and we are happy to welcome you to the UBC Med family. We do hope that in your spare time you will remain active on this forum and help other applicants. fugacity&Cerena
  6. From your UBC moderators, Cerena and I, we wish you the best of luck in this interview cycle. All of your hardwork has culminated in this moment: the MMI. It was actually an enjoyable experience for most of us, and even when we are up at night doing call, we will still remember those moments during the interview. We hope that you can be yourself and feel comfortable, as that's really key to the interview from the perspective of a couple of med students. All the best, UBC mods
  7. The thing with Anes is that you will never get to stick to one attending, even on electives, unless the school is extremely accommodating (basically the same as EM). I understand it is hard to get a letter this way, but remember everyone will have to suffer through this. While your letter may not be the most in depth, it is the same for everyone. I would get a letter as a back up if I feel above average or on good terms with the attending. Halfway through my clerkship, I've only had one letter, and this is me not shy asking about letters
  8. is anyone able to get this card? Avion Visa Infinite Privilegehttp://www.rbcroyalbank.com/credit-cards/travel-credit-cards/avion-visa-infinite-privilege.html Tbh ever since UBC stopped accepting credits for payment, it's really hard to get points (being frugal and all). Therefore it might be worth it to get a card with more side perks: free checked bag, priority check in etc.
  9. fugacity

    Importance Of Mspr

    Having studied for the step 1 exam, I am so glad that I'm in the Canadian system. Does knowing the pathophysiology of telangiectasia ataxia make someone a good physician or is it someone that works hard and is keen to learn? I feel bad for the US students that spend months and months on minute details like this.
  10. QFT. Full panic mode
  11. When I last vacationed in China I took one of the high speed trains. The old lady next to me literally said to his son "pass me my TB drugs, it's time to take them." I bolted right after that.
  12. fugacity

    Pay For Conference?

    This is totally situation dependent and it is entirely up to you. Generally (again generally) research experience rather than results (pubs) is important for applying to medical school. So if I were you, I would not shell out the extra money by myself to attend this conference unless 1) I am really proud of my results and would love to present it or 2) I really want to visit the city and would probably pay to visit anyway. I know it seems wrong to pay for conferences when almost everyone has a substantial subsidy, these are your results and you decide what you want to do with them.
  13. I don't understand why people forget this very important aspect of clerkship. Blows my mind
  14. Having just finished my first rotation, I can confirm that there is no reason to be anxious, as the expectations are extremely low. Like ellorie said, you have a lot of support going into this, and more or less you can decide how much responsibility you want. It helps to prepare and know what you are talking about, but that is not generally expected. Just read around your cases and also pay attention to the academic days and everything will be fine. Remember you are not alone in this, nor is your class first to experience this. Staff and residents know what's up and will walk you through the transitional period. What I find (and being told) are really important for success is 1) being keen and eager 2) work hard, help out your team and 3) be mindful that it is okay there's a lot you don't know, and you will work one thing at a time to change that It really is a blast though, and everyone I talk to would not trade clerkship for the preclerkship experience. It sounds insincere and like something you would say in an MMI, but you really do make a difference in the lives of the patients you see, and that's tons better than memorizing the coagulation cascade.
  15. fugacity

    E-Mail Signature

    This will sound a bit insensitive, but I don't think you have started Day 1 of med school yet? I know you are super excited, but there is merit for modesty in medicine. A very big no no I have recently learned is not to referring yourself as Dr. so and so while communicating with colleagues, especially as a resident. While this is not the same, I would not recommend the full "MD class of" signature in every single email. I agree with having it for a research email or shadowing email is helpful, but otherwise I'd just leave it at a first name.
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