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LeBronto2019

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LeBronto2019 last won the day on February 13 2016

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  1. LeBronto2019

    CaRMS 2019 Interview -- INVITATIONS only

    Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7), Ottawa(Dec 8), Memorial(Dec 12), Western (Dec 12) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Western (Dec 12), MUN (Dec 13) Emergency Medicine: Queen's (Dec 11) Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4), Saskatchewan (Prince Albert - Dec 10), UofT (Dec 12) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 11), McMaster (Dec 13)  General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3), Sherbrooke (Dec 12) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: To be announced on January 3rd Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 11), Memorial (Dec 12) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), McMaster (Dec 7), UBC (Dec 11), Neuropathology: Western (Dec 11) Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30), Western (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), McGill (Dec 12) Nuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke (Dec 07) Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Manitoba (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 11), UBC (Dec 12) Ophthalmology: UBC (Dec 4), Western (Dec 10), Alberta (Dec 11) Orthopaedic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 7), McGill (Dec 10) Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6) Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4), Manitoba (Dec 11) PM&R: Queens (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30), Western (December 6), UofT (December 12th), Calgary (December 12th), USask (Dec 6), Alberta (Dec 7)  Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7), Ottawa (Dec 7), Alberta (Dec 10), NOSM (Dec 11), Queens (Dec 12), USask-Regina (Dec 12), UBC (Dec 12) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), NOSM (Dec 12) UofT (Dec 12), Ottawa (Dec 13) Radiation Oncology: Calgary (December 10), Alberta (Dec 11), UBC (Dec 11)  Urology: Western (Dec4), Dalhousie (Dec5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6), Toronto (Dec 8) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26), Western (Dec 10)
  2. LeBronto2019

    CaRMS 2019 Interview -- INVITATIONS only

    Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4), Memorial (Dec 5), Laval (Dec 5), Toronto (Dec 6), McGill (Dec 6), UBC (Dec 6), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10) Anesthesiology: NOSM (Dec 7), Ottawa(Dec 8), Memorial(Dec 12), Western (Dec 12) Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Queen's (Dec 5), McGill (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 7), Calgary (Dec 7), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Western (Dec 12) Emergency Medicine: Queen's (Dec 11) Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4), Saskatchewan (Prince Albert - Dec 10), UofT (Dec 12) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 11) General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3), Sherbrooke (Dec 12) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 11) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec3), Montreal (Dec 4), Calgary (Dec 4), McGill (Dec 10), McMaster (Dec 7), UBC (Dec 11) Neuropathology: Western (Dec 11) Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30), Western (Dec 7), Dalhousie (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), McGill (Dec 12) Nuclear Medicine: Sherbrooke (Dec 07) Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Manitoba (Dec 10), Calgary (Dec 10), Ottawa (Dec 11) Ophthalmology: Western (Dec 10), Alberta (Dec 11) Orthopaedic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 7), McGill (Dec 10) Otolaryngology: Alberta (Dec 6) Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4), Manitoba (Dec 11) PM&R: Queens University (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30), Western (December 6), UofT (December 12th), Calgary (December 12th), USask (Dec 6), Alberta (Dec 7)  Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4), Calgary (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 5), U of T (Dec 7), Ottawa (Dec 7), Alberta (Dec 10), NOSM (Dec 11), Queens (Dec 12), USask-Regina (Dec 12), UBC (Dec 12) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5), Manitoba (Dec 7), McMaster (Dec 10), UBC (Dec 12), NOSM (Dec 12) UofT (Dec 12) Radiation Oncology: Calgary (December 10), Alberta (Dec 11) Urology: Western (Dec4), Dalhousie (Dec5), McMaster (Dec 5), Ottawa (Dec 6), Toronto (Dec 8) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26), Western (Dec 10)
  3. LeBronto2019

    CaRMS 2019 Interview -- INVITATIONS only

    Anatomical Pathology: Queens (Dec 3), Calgary (Dec 3), Alberta (Dec 3), Western (Dec 4) Anesthesiology: Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Alberta (Dec 4) Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27) Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: Ontario (Nov 28; IMG only), Laval (Nov 30), Montréal (Dec 4) General Pathology: Calgary (Nov 22), Alberta (Dec 3) General Surgery: McGill (Dec 3) Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Calgary (Nov 27), UBC (Nov 29) Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Western (Dec 3), Dalhousie (Dec 4) Neurology - Paediatric: Alberta (Dec 3), Montreal (Dec 4) Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: McMaster (Nov 30) Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Ophthalmology: Orthopaedic Surgery: Otolaryngology: Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: Alberta (Dec 4) PM&R: Queens University (Nov 22), McMaster (Nov 26), UBC (Nov 30), Manitoba (Nov 30) Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 23), Sherbrooke (Nov 27), McMaster- Hamilton and Waterloo (Dec. 4), Western - London & Windsor (Dec. 4), McGill (Dec. 4) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Alberta (Dec 5) Radiation Oncology: Urology: Western (Dec 4th) Vascular Surgery: Toronto (Nov 26)
  4. LeBronto2019

    Program Descriptions

    Some programs have a link to their last years requirements if you need
  5. LeBronto2019

    Public Health And Preventative Medicine Residency

    Not sure where it's needed the most but we may end up going to northern BC or Red Deer or more rural/remote sites if we want to become MOH. Would love to see where this field is heading in the next decade or so but limited job prospects are certainly concerning heading into carms.
  6. LeBronto2019

    Public Health And Preventative Medicine Residency

    Unfortunately, it's quite saturated! Especially by the time we finish residency, there will already be plenty of PHPM graduates who will be looking to fill those spots. Know a few who have had to adjust their career paths upon graduating and others who got MOH positions but across the country. It's a little concerning so hopefully things look brighter soon.
  7. LeBronto2019

    Applying to Multiple Specialties

    Two out of three of those is what I'd like so maybe I should take a chance with this strategy
  8. LeBronto2019

    Applying to Multiple Specialties

    Thoughts on this with respect to 3 non-competitive specialties? Main interest is in addictions medicine (clinical and research) but not sure whether to do it through family med, psychiatry or even PHPM. Doing longitudinal FM clerkship + 2 weeks FM, 6 weeks electives for each of the others.
  9. Sorry, I didn't mean it that way. I meant that nutrition evidence itself has shifted in so many directions that there is always research for and against everything else. Dietitians are the obvious experts in the field, but I'm worried that the evidence is not as clear as other fields where individual physiology, compliance to the diet, comorbidities and personal preference don't allow for clear conclusive evidence towards one dietary plan vs another. I'm very glad that RDs aren't going purely off the food guide. My experiences with RDs have been that they say they are taught to champion the food guide so that made me iffy. Much more knowledgable than any other professional in nutrition and dietary science but the system itself does not support their work by providing a terrible food guide or pushing society towards unhealthy behaviors/options. Again, considering how vastly unique everyone's approach to nutrition is, there have also been differences between dietitians on the correct way to manage patients. Some may be strong advocates for whole foods plant based or LCHF or Mediterranean or DASH. They know when to implement each into someones care plan but if each individual dietitian follows or advises (generally) on different plans, it just shows that the system does not create uniformity in guidelines or sound evidence to go off of. Nothing against dietitians, its a systemic problem.
  10. We don't consider the biodiversity argument in nutrition that we're all different genetically and metabolically. Our socioeconomic factors and general lifestyles contribute to health too. Everyone should be trial-and-erroring different diets to see what makes them (1) feel better, (2) reach appropriate health outcomes and (3) able to sustain this approach for life. From an Indian family, there is too much diabetes and HTN but they have no intention of changing their diets. Having adopted keto, my personal weight goals have been achieved and nearly all lab values have improved (particularly A1c, triglycerides and HDL/LDL) so it's entirely possible that we're more susceptible to insulin resistance and I'm thriving on this diet, whereas others may feel awful and do worse with LCHF (but thrive on vegan or a HCLF plan). The dilemma for me is going into clinical rotation next year where we cannot just give advice that has worked for us, it has to be guided by evidence. I do not entirely agree with all nutrition guidelines or research due to other factors (like difficulty of having accurate long-term studies in nutrition) and even interest groups influencing results or industries with their own agendas. General tips like eating whole food, portion control, more vegetables, drinking water/tea/coffee only, no trans fats or added sugar, etc. are universal but beyond that, it seems difficult to advise others. I agree with @gangliocytoma that we've become too loose on carb consumption and the very nature of diabetes and obesity stem from insulin resistance so changing status quo away from grains as a major part of our diet will take ages to reach. 6-8 servings of grain a day? Seriously? Especially when carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that is not essential. If the true healthy plate has 50% vegetables, 25% grains and 25% protein, how many plates does someone need to get 8 servings of grains? Max 3-4 a day would fit with this proportion. I don't want to say to completely cut it out (cause its unrealistic for vast majority) but I'm sure we can get away from sugar-loaded foods, refined flour, and push for whole grains that are actually whole grain (not the whole grain bread bs that we romanticize as the best option). I hope for better research in the future but it's such a dilemma until then. Couldn't agree more that doctors don't know about nutrition cause we're not taught about it but I also feel no one really knows about nutrition. "Eat foods. Not too much. Mostly plants" would alleviate a lot of health issues and can be a simple mantra for all to use. Also, intermittent fasting has been shown to improve outcomes but never mentioned as a plausible option cause why would the food industry want people to cut out meals and I'm sure vested interests in the US would rather you be sick and pay more for healthcare than just focus on prevention. Prevention doesn't make the $$$ for healthcare. Ok I'm done.
  11. LeBronto2019

    Annual Specialty Competitiveness Stats

    Bless PHPM and FM
  12. LeBronto2019

    Specialties that use telemedicine

    Worked on some tele-ophthalmology projects and there was even a TED talk on an smart phone add-on that was used for ophthalmic assessments: https://www.ted.com/talks/andrew_bastawrous_get_your_next_eye_exam_on_a_smartphone
  13. I'm aiming for PHPM and/or FM right now. I'll already have 10 months of rural clerkship in 3rd year so I thought that will help with FM a lot. I'll also be doing 2 weeks of PHPM this summer. My elective plans: 3 electives in PHPM 1 elective in FM (but special populations like inner city or prison) 1 elective for ID or Peds ID Maybe 1 in occupational medicine I'm more concerned with how people have managed to work through the portal or strategies to help in general when having so many electives in a row. Since I'm in Alberta, my plan was to do 1 in BC, 1 in AB, then go out east for the rest so it's easier to commute around than going back and forth around the country.
  14. Heading into clerkship, my schedule has 13 weeks straight of electives between years 3 and 4. Any tips or strategies to make the most out of this? Initially, it seemed like a solid schedule but many older students say that it is difficult to schedule and arrange electives (esp. around Canada) with all electives at one time.
  15. LeBronto2019

    University Of Alberta For Undergrad

    UofA is great. Big enough to have every opportunity as any other university but small enough that youre not overwhelmed with 500+ students in a single lecture hall. Campus life is pretty good and enough ways to get involved (and still have fun)! Definitely look into courses, profs and see what suits your interests. If you want to go straight for something medical, hit up physiology or pharmacology or neuroscience. If you want a more diverse experience, consider doing a general bio degree or delve into social sciences like Psych (highly recommended but also biased) and Soc and Anthro. If you want to keep options open in the future for post-BSc careers, consider Engg or Nursing or Business or Comp Sci. Don't do anything to "impress" med schools via degree choice, just enjoy what youll study for 4+ years and work hard.
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