Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Edict

Members
  • Content Count

    1,835
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    13

Edict last won the day on January 24

Edict had the most liked content!

1 Follower

About Edict

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Profile Information

  • Occupation
    Medical Student

Recent Profile Visitors

3,188 profile views
  1. Sorry that your school has so many early electives. I don't think its absolutely impossible to match to plastics at this point, but it will be challenging. I think it would be crucial to start making yourself known in the program, so shadowing plastic surgery at your home program when you have free time. If you can get a 4 week elective in plastics, I would do that at your home program and essentially aim to match to your home school. It probably is the best chance you'll get. Surgery is fickle, just because you have the perfect resume on paper with a million electives etc doesn't mean you will always get in. If the program knows you and likes you, they will take you over others that have a more perfect resume. Another thing to get exposure is to start doing research projects with your home program. Meet with your program director/faculty, talk to residents you know in the program, make it clear your reasons for pursuing plastics and then demonstrate that you are serious and not all talk by putting your all into building as strong a plastics app as you can. How many spots does your home school have a year? That can matter as well. Mentally, like others have said you should also be prepared to match to your backup because it is still a long shot.
  2. Edict

    Publications

    Yes, its all about distinguishing yourself from the other candidates. If you want to match to your top choice, you want to be the person who's resume really pops out at the reader. They like to see people going above and beyond in resumes and this can come in the form of leadership, advocacy, research, teaching, innovation/enterpreneurship a combination of them. The other big side is of course networking, whether or not they know and like you, ref letters and electives, but don't underestimate the CV as well. A common mistake people do sometimes make is that they assume that if they just do all electives in one specialty, perform well on those electives and get decent reference letters, they will get into their top choices. This does work often, but if you want something competitive, you'll find that theres a lot of people who have the above and the way to really distinguish yourself is through the above.
  3. McMaster has cadavers but its not a dissection course where there are 7 to 8 students per body and you dissect the cadaver out over the course of several months or a year. They have about 5 or so cadavers most of which are in serious state of disrepair, structures are damaged and the body is so dessicated, and forgive me for this analogy but it looks more like jerky than real tissue. I remember one of the anatomists was trying to show us the phrenic nerve innervating the diaphragm and spent half a minute trying to find it before admitting that the phrenic nerve was damaged and disconnected from the diaphragm. I genuinely don't understand how McMaster's anatomy lab ever wins any awards, but if they do it is clearly not because of their MD teaching. In fact BHSc students and physiotherapy students are prioritized over MD students for anatomy lab teaching. To be fair, McMaster as a whole is kind of a good experiment to show that if you select the right cohort of motivated students, they can essentially figure it out themselves. It kind of proves the Caribbean model isn't completely without merit.
  4. Edict

    Publications

    You need to ask residents because this is often specialty and center dependent. If you are applying to a research heavy department, it often tends to be more important. I think research is probably especially important in radiology given how technology driven the specialty is.
  5. Edict

    Dermatology as IMG

    They also often take true IMGs who have done years of research for them to build connections. What I would say is its almost impossible and not worth trying unless you are willing to do years of research with them in the hopes of maybe having a chance at a spot.
  6. I personally think its a great idea. It levels out the playing field between schools and it allows people to make decisions later. Sure, people at some schools that currently have the unfair advantage are going to complain, but that is the nature of a zero sum game like CaRMS, any change will upset someone.
  7. Actually this has been well known for years. Maybe less so at public universities, but at private universities like the Ivy League, they give preference to parents who donate significant sums of money to the school. The only difference is that the parents paid an external admissions consultant to lie to the schools about their children's applications. This is a step too far for the schools. Normally, you can simply donate money to the school to become a "development" applicant (aka, school hopes to get more money from you in the future). Now some parents seem to be taking it a step further and making up stories about their children's applications which is why they are getting caught.
  8. It may be the case for Sherbrooke but i'm not sure its exactly the same for Calgary. Sherbrooke has a worse student/population ratio than Calgary does. I think Calgary's issue could easily be solved with curriculum changes.
  9. I would check to ensure this goes nowhere on your transcript or MSPR (which are different things btw). It is absolutely crucial that this does not show up for CaRMS. If it does, I would fight tooth and nail to have it changed or removed. It is unfair for this to happen and it is likely the subspecialty preceptor just expects elective clerks to be functioning at a 4th yr level and that is unfortunate.
  10. I would recommend post-carms for radiology. Honestly, you don't learn much and it would probably be a waste of your pre-carms time to do it. Not sure if you are in the class with the limited elective time, but if you are going to do one outside your field of interest I would recommend a related surgical specialty or ICU. You will learn more on those electives than on radiology.
  11. I would go to whichever you feel like you would want to do residency in. Just be aware that Sunnybrook is a high volume center with a lot of acuity but also a lot of fellows and residents. Just because a center deals with high acuity doesn't necessarily mean as a medical student it is a better learning experience.
  12. Either is enough to get you in. CaRMS can really be unpredictable. With that being said, I felt that CTU gave you a better chance to impress your attending because of how teaching focused it is. I felt like it is easier to impress on CTU because of how broad ranged it is, whereas subspecialty often requires an indepth knowledge of one area of medicine, which a medical student usually doesn't have. The staff on CTU are more likely to be involved and/or known to the admissions committee as well. I think your choice is great. Definitely do some subspecialty to explore for your own interest, to show diversity and show you've explored. I think something like 40-70% of your electives in CTU is great. The best singular piece of advice to get a good LOR on CTU is to try to act at the level of a junior resident. It can be hard during your first elective, but as you go along and get the hang of how a CTU runs. You often will get there. Its about being keen, likeable, eager but also not stepping on other people's toes, intelligent, asking the right questions etc.
  13. But they can still demonstrate they are gunners, since theres no real cap for IM. Overall the change is probably for the better once people settle in and get used to it. No question that being the guinea pig year will be frustrating especially for students from schools that have more elective time than others.
  14. Edict

    LMCC Part II sites

    In the past its been held at McMaster University in the Health Sciences Building I believe.
  15. It depends on how hard it is for you to pursue it. We would need more information
×