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Fresh fry

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  1. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from kol26 in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    Yup, except the family part. I wish I could do it but it makes me miserable. Can't stand the Doc McStuffins crap, the same people with the same problems, fixing insulin for people who won't exercise, tweaking inhalers, beta blockers, coumadin. Screening, oh god I hate screening. Not having enough time to do a good job. Glad there are good people out there that can do it but I would kill for a short residency in something I could do.
     
    This is definitely not my last career, pay the bills, stack some cash, then maybe switch out to working in the stock room at walmart where I never have to see another human again.
  2. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from benelli104 in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    Absolutely not. People are bastard coated bastards with bastard filling. 
     
    If you ever find a happy resident find out who their dealer is.
  3. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from partyofurniture in Surgeons, Do You Care At All For Clinical Correlation Recommendations From Radiology?   
    As a surgical resident my ideal imaging report would be:
     
    1) Type of imaging including list of phases. IE: CT abdo with arterial, venous, portal venous, and non contrast
     
    2) Indication for imaging: Why I, or whomever, asked for imaging. Ex: RO ACUTE APPY (in all caps)
     
    3) Summary including all caps answer and or all caps incidental finding. Right at the very top, the very first thing, and yes 80% of the time no one will read the rest of the report hence the caps. Just pertinent positives and negatives.IE: NO EVIDENCE OF ACUTE APPY, normal bowel gas, no free air, no free fluid, INCIDENTAL 2MM R ADRENAL MASS.
     
    4) Suggestions for follow up imaging or indicate that no other imaging would be useful: IE: This is not an ideal study to look for cholelithiasis, suggest abdominal U/S. Given body mass could also attempt PTC placement +/- cholangiogram with contrast. Suggest F/U CT for incidental pulmonary nodule in 6/12.
     
    5) Systems based pertinent break down. IE: Billiary tree is non dilated and free of air. Gallbladder measures 4cm with no evidence of sludge or wall thickening. Liver is unremarkable except a 3cm hemangiomatous legion in segment 5 as previously mentioned. Spleen is unremarkable with no evidence of aneurysm in splenic artery and a well shielded splenic vein. Pancreas has mild fatty infiltrates consistent with previous scan the pancreatic duct is not appreciated. Portal vein is poorly visualized in this study. There appears to be no pathological processes involving any portions of the large and small intestine. Bony structures are consistent with a patient of this age. Incidental plebolith in lower pelvis is unchanged from last image dated dec 2015.
     
    Meat and potatoes, question asked, questioned answered. No buzz phrases like "clinical correlation required", nothing crazy to show off how much more you know than me like "there is an anomalous branch of the SMA that is consistent with VanHoutten syndrome which is a benign finding attributed to 5% of Philippino men born in 1960-65 that has no impact to clinical care or the reason you asked for the scan but I read about last night and have been waiting to include in a report all day". But that's just me.
  4. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from robclem21 in Experiences At University   
    Thank you for your input, it's always good to get advice from different perspectives.
     
    I think you are taking away something from what I wrote that I did not intend. I must not have been clear so thank you for bringing this to my attention. I am in no way advocating that the OP needs to do anything but study. As someone who completed their undergrad in 3 years and is currently a busy surgical resident with a young family I completely understand the importance of work-life balance. What I said, or rather what I intended to impart, was that when it comes to choosing a university with the intention of getting into medical school I would skew the deciding factors towards things that affect one's GPA over more trivial things like social aspects. To me these are things like class selection and availability, access and presence of high output researchers in health science fields, and degree programs offered. To clarify I have at no time suggested that the OP do nothing but study. That being said as anyone who has been on this forum for any length of time will attest too, unless the OP wants to find themselves needing to apply multiple times and face multiple rejections, the key to success in getting accepted to medical school in Canada is unarguably a strong full time undergraduate GPA and everything should be done to facilitate that while maintaining a good work-life balance and remaining active in strong and fulfilling ECs.
  5. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Kate8188 in Experiences At University   
    Thank you for your input, it's always good to get advice from different perspectives.
     
    I think you are taking away something from what I wrote that I did not intend. I must not have been clear so thank you for bringing this to my attention. I am in no way advocating that the OP needs to do anything but study. As someone who completed their undergrad in 3 years and is currently a busy surgical resident with a young family I completely understand the importance of work-life balance. What I said, or rather what I intended to impart, was that when it comes to choosing a university with the intention of getting into medical school I would skew the deciding factors towards things that affect one's GPA over more trivial things like social aspects. To me these are things like class selection and availability, access and presence of high output researchers in health science fields, and degree programs offered. To clarify I have at no time suggested that the OP do nothing but study. That being said as anyone who has been on this forum for any length of time will attest too, unless the OP wants to find themselves needing to apply multiple times and face multiple rejections, the key to success in getting accepted to medical school in Canada is unarguably a strong full time undergraduate GPA and everything should be done to facilitate that while maintaining a good work-life balance and remaining active in strong and fulfilling ECs.
  6. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from m_jacob_45 in Experiences At University   
    Thank you for your input, it's always good to get advice from different perspectives.
     
    I think you are taking away something from what I wrote that I did not intend. I must not have been clear so thank you for bringing this to my attention. I am in no way advocating that the OP needs to do anything but study. As someone who completed their undergrad in 3 years and is currently a busy surgical resident with a young family I completely understand the importance of work-life balance. What I said, or rather what I intended to impart, was that when it comes to choosing a university with the intention of getting into medical school I would skew the deciding factors towards things that affect one's GPA over more trivial things like social aspects. To me these are things like class selection and availability, access and presence of high output researchers in health science fields, and degree programs offered. To clarify I have at no time suggested that the OP do nothing but study. That being said as anyone who has been on this forum for any length of time will attest too, unless the OP wants to find themselves needing to apply multiple times and face multiple rejections, the key to success in getting accepted to medical school in Canada is unarguably a strong full time undergraduate GPA and everything should be done to facilitate that while maintaining a good work-life balance and remaining active in strong and fulfilling ECs.
  7. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Kate8188 in Experiences At University   
    This is Canada so all the universities you mentioned are pretty much equal in terms of the education you are going to get. All of our schools are top tier and will prepare you for med which is why what school you went too doesn't play much of a role in things like jobs or med/grad school applications. I have never heard anyone say "oh that person went to UBC, they must not be very good, lets take the applicant who went to McGill". The only real differences will be:
     
    1) class sizes
    2) class numbers (bigger schools have more classes offered and thus more flexible schedules which can be very important)
    3) programs and specializations offered
    4) access to researchers. I know you are only in grade 11 but if you had a certain research interest than that might affect your choice of school as you might want to go to a place where they have someone active in that specific field.
     
    The dorms, swimming pools, social stuff is all trivial. You are looking for an education not a summer camp. If you are thinking of medicine then I would go to a school where I could focus on my grades, take the courses I needed to take (so avoid small schools that may only offer certain courses at certain times and may have wait lists) and save as much money as possible. The last thing I would care about is the social vibe because if you are serious about med than you are going to be missing out on a lot of it anyway. You need to get the highest GPA you can, everything you do from here on out should be to facilitate that. GL
  8. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from palefire in Mmi Question   
    The way I approached all MMI questions (and CaRMs interviews, guess for basically any interview questions I have been asked) was "what is the purpose of the question?". Are they asking you about a contentious topic because they want to know your opinion? Possibly but with the very limited information provided I would assume that the point of the question was to determine whether you are able to see a contentious issue from all sides. 
     
    Take the trump travel ban for example. Say there is a question asking you if you support the ban, sure maybe on some level they want to know if you are a crazy right wing bigot (red flag) but more likely they are trying to see if you can identify the feelings and motivations behind those that do support it. Many of your patients will have completely unreasonable beliefs and you need to be able to identify why it is that they feel this way. Just the other day I had a woman who was convinced she wasn't able to breath well because we didn't let her go for a smoke. She felt that this was the reason why she was dyspnic. Of course that isn't the case but it doesn't help the situation to provide her with the "right" reasons why she can't breath and simply state them. You need to identify with her concerns and her beliefs in order to change them otherwise you just come off as authoritarian. 
     
    From my experience MMI questions are almost never concerned with what your opinion is, they are a tool to get at your thought processes and your ability to empathize as well as identify motives that may be contrary to your own. Other times they are to assess how rigid you are in your thinking and whether you can think on your feet. 
     
    For any questions involving controversial issues my approach is 1) identify the competing beliefs 2) highlight the positive motivations for both 3) highlight the possible misconceptions 4) state my opinion referring to the evidence already stated.
     
    So for the made up trump question I would say something like:
     
    "Because of the heightened media focus by certain outlets in the US there is a common misconception that refugees from certain countries are at higher risk and are less likely to integrate into US culture, something that is highly valued and differing from our own 'mosaic' approach we take here in Canada. I understand given this misinformation why many would be in favor of the ban. they simply feel that it is a common sense approach to what is essentially a non existent threat that has dominated the news cycle and stems from xenophobia. I feel that the right response is to oppose the band as these are the people who are fleeing the very monsters we are accusing them of being etc etc etc"    
  9. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from MountainAmoeba in Mmi Question   
    The way I approached all MMI questions (and CaRMs interviews, guess for basically any interview questions I have been asked) was "what is the purpose of the question?". Are they asking you about a contentious topic because they want to know your opinion? Possibly but with the very limited information provided I would assume that the point of the question was to determine whether you are able to see a contentious issue from all sides. 
     
    Take the trump travel ban for example. Say there is a question asking you if you support the ban, sure maybe on some level they want to know if you are a crazy right wing bigot (red flag) but more likely they are trying to see if you can identify the feelings and motivations behind those that do support it. Many of your patients will have completely unreasonable beliefs and you need to be able to identify why it is that they feel this way. Just the other day I had a woman who was convinced she wasn't able to breath well because we didn't let her go for a smoke. She felt that this was the reason why she was dyspnic. Of course that isn't the case but it doesn't help the situation to provide her with the "right" reasons why she can't breath and simply state them. You need to identify with her concerns and her beliefs in order to change them otherwise you just come off as authoritarian. 
     
    From my experience MMI questions are almost never concerned with what your opinion is, they are a tool to get at your thought processes and your ability to empathize as well as identify motives that may be contrary to your own. Other times they are to assess how rigid you are in your thinking and whether you can think on your feet. 
     
    For any questions involving controversial issues my approach is 1) identify the competing beliefs 2) highlight the positive motivations for both 3) highlight the possible misconceptions 4) state my opinion referring to the evidence already stated.
     
    So for the made up trump question I would say something like:
     
    "Because of the heightened media focus by certain outlets in the US there is a common misconception that refugees from certain countries are at higher risk and are less likely to integrate into US culture, something that is highly valued and differing from our own 'mosaic' approach we take here in Canada. I understand given this misinformation why many would be in favor of the ban. they simply feel that it is a common sense approach to what is essentially a non existent threat that has dominated the news cycle and stems from xenophobia. I feel that the right response is to oppose the band as these are the people who are fleeing the very monsters we are accusing them of being etc etc etc"    
  10. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from palefire in If Medicine Really Worth It   
    I will bite because this is something that had been a central theme throughout med school for me.
     
    1) We would all like to think that people get into medicine for noble reasons, and when we are interviewing everyone plays the part. "I want to advance (insert random cause here) and be a role model" "I want to be at the forefront of human science and technology" "I want to cure (insert random disease here) that affected my second cousin twice removed". The reality is much different. From my experience people get into medicine for a varying combination of the following reasons: 
     
    1) Steady and secure job with great pay and portability
    2) Respect from society
    3) Respect from parents/girlfriend/boyfriend/best friend/high school guidance counselor who said you would never amount to anything
    4) Parents are forcing me
    5) I want a job where I think and don't get my hands dirty
    6) I like gross things and I want to cut into people
    7) I like power
    8) I want to do something that has meaning/purpose
    9) I want people to think I am smart
    10) I want to help people*
     
    * This is always the first thing that people say and it is always the first thing that goes by the wayside. Personally I think when people are forced to really examine this motive there isn't much depth to it. If you want to "help people" (and not you personally but people in general) why does it have to be medicine? Why not psychology, PT/OT, resp therapy, non-medical stuff like working for an NGO or social work. Everyone on this forum will say that this is their number one reason why they follow this path but I got to tell you when someone is on hour 22 of a 30 hour call shift and they are called to see a patient, or to make it a bit more relevant to you, when someone is in clinic and they are trying to get through 20-40 patients so they can pay the bills and keep the lights on, it is rarely the "desire to help people" that keeps them going. It is all the other things on the list, and most of the time it is all about the Benjamins. 
     
    Now this is coming from someone who has just been on a month of night shifts in a major city's ER, and I fully admit I am a bit burnt and bitter, but this is a longstanding trend I have observed. 
     
    Everyone comes into medical school thinking "I will be the one who is different, I am going to get through all this and stay true to my ideals and principles" yet I can only think of a handful of docs I have come across who I would safely say have maintained a noble perspective. Medschool and residency changes people and strips away the veneer of false motives. What comes out on the other side is usually not the ideal. Again this is not always the case.
     
    I remember a resident I met on a rotation when I was a 1st year med student. I thought she was the best person I had ever come across. Did a masters, big on refugee health care, big on women's health. She was in 1st year of residency. Took time to teach, took time to talk to every patient and make sure they understood everything, called families at home. Advance 3 years and I am on rotation and she is a senior resident. Total 180. 3 years of being perpetually tired, abused by patients and preceptors, and never leaving the hospital broke her. She was like every other surgical senior resident: hard as nails with zero patience for anything or anyone. It is something I am watching play out again in real time as my friends advance through residency. I distinctly recall mourning the day a close friend matched to gen surge because I knew she would be a different person on the other side and I am sad to say I already hate how bitter and jaded she has become 2 years in.
     
    I personally believe that everyone who gets into this wants to be good at it regardless of their motives. I think almost everyone wants to do the right thing in most situations. But I think that the system is broken and the weight of the world crushes most peoples idealism and the only thing that keeps them going is the more baser desires. The few who are the exceptions to the rule are truly remarkable people and if you ever come across one do all that you can to learn from them and keep them in your life. 
     
    2) Now with respect to your condition.
     
    Take your family doc for example. They have the shortest and easiest residencies. Family medicine usually attracts the more bubbly and idealistic students because it involves spending your day working with patients and their families. However, some pick family med because it is the easiest and most portable vocation. It is no secret that they don't get paid very well compared to other specialties, meaning if you want to make money you need to see as many patients as possible in a day. Most fee for service is set up on a 15 minute billing code. So they get paid X amount to see a patient for 15 minutes. If it is a complicated patient or there is something extra to be done they can charge extra (to the province) for things like a pap, or to remove stitches, etc. For most patients they can only charge the basic 15 minute rate. Working 8 hours a day means 32 patients if it works like clock work. To make any real money you need to see >40 patients in a day so some aren't getting their full 15 minutes. Others are going to take up more than their 15 and so that eats into the schedule too.
     
    So you come to the office with a complicated complaint related to something that requires a specialist. Your family doctor has a very basic knowledge of how to treat complex endocrine disorders, that is why we have endocrinologists. How long does it take for you to tell them what is wrong? How long to examine? How long to chart? Now you have a problem that they don't know a lot about and have to try to look stuff up, how much can you learn about a complex endocrinopathy in 15 minutes? in 5 minutes? Not enough to treat someone effectively. Your family doc is saying to themselves "I don't know how to treat this person, they have a specialist who knows, why are they coming to see me about something I can't fix? The specialist will know how what to do. Are they dying? No, they can wait to see their specialist". 
     
    Now you see your specialist, and this is the big disconnect between physicians and society. What you think is an emergency or urgent is not the same as what they do. You think "this is really affecting my life, I am suffering, I need help, why won't anyone help me?". Your specialist is thinking "I had 2 patients die yesterday on call, I have to get through 30 follow up appointments today, one of them is that woman who keeps coming to emerge in query thyroid storm, one of them is that guy whose blood sugar is through the roof and he keeps going into DKA and I am worried he will die this week, and one is that person with the hashimotos and the headaches whose family doc keeps sending them to me". From the endos standpoint you are the least sick person they will see that day and their therapeutic goals are not the same as yours. You want to be back to normal health, they want to do the best they can for you but primarily keep you alive.
     
    Its not the endos fault, there is just so many hours in the day and so many patients to see. Same for the family doc. Giving them the benefit of the doubt they are probably doing the best they can for you considering they only know so much and have so many other patients to see. I never give medical advice over the internet, and given that you have a family doc, an endocrinologist, and a plastic surgeon who are all qualified physicians it would be presumptuous of me to think they haven't considered a prolactinoma, but given your headaches I would be remiss to tell you that if you start having vision changes (tunnel vision) that you need to see someone and let them know about that new symptom.
     
    TLDR: If you want to help people you don't have to be a doctor. Most physicians want to do a good job and help you but their motives are not always 100% to "help people". There seems to be a communication breakdown about what your goals of health are and what can be done for you at the moment and you should discuss this at your next visit. 
     
    Good Luck
  11. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from MountainAmoeba in What Are My Chances?   
    Agree with other posters: U of C is your best bet. If you have been on this forum for any length of time you will know that fulltime undergrad GPA is the biggest factor for acceptance. You are definitely on the low side but Calgary tends to be the best place to go for non-trads. Being in province is a big boost. I would still apply broadly including the Ontario schools, especially Queens and McMaster. The next biggest hurdle is your MCAT. My advice is throw everything you have at it and get it done once. Living like a monk for 6 months and doing nothing but studying is better than rewriting the damn thing over and over again. GL
  12. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from trimethoprim in -   
    CaRMs was worse for me but nothing like the uncertainty of finding a job. It is four years away and already keeping me up at nights. 
     
    I wish I had some great piece of advise for the OP about how to pass the time and keep your finger nails intact but I got nothing. Maybe there is some solace in knowing you are not alone and that this is part of the "right of passage". Maybe you will take comfort in the thought that one day soon you be writing a post similar to this trying to comfort someone following in your footsteps reliving a small bit of the anxiety you experienced years back before you were finally accepted. 
     
    In all situations the one thing that works a little bit for me is that it has been my experience that with a little bit of persistence and time the right people will get in, the rest is a matter of logistics and patience. Keep the faith. 
  13. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Intermediate in -   
    It is very difficult to be objective about these things and you have no idea what they are looking for in some situations. Unless you tripped coming through the door and told the interviewer that you are prejudice against all races, it probably didn't go as bad as it did in your head.
     
    I thought I blew my interview in Calgary (many years ago). They asked us to interpret a painting and I totally missed the point, There were other stations that I thought I did poorly on too but in the end they accepted me (went to a different school).
     
    Here is the crappy part: there is nothing you can do now to change anything, you have to do what all of us have done before you and try your best to get through the next couple months without driving yourself crazy and second guessing yourself. It's done, it's over, you did your best at the time I'm sure. Take a deep breath and we can chat more if your fears are confirmed.
  14. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Friendly Magpie in -   
    It is very difficult to be objective about these things and you have no idea what they are looking for in some situations. Unless you tripped coming through the door and told the interviewer that you are prejudice against all races, it probably didn't go as bad as it did in your head.
     
    I thought I blew my interview in Calgary (many years ago). They asked us to interpret a painting and I totally missed the point, There were other stations that I thought I did poorly on too but in the end they accepted me (went to a different school).
     
    Here is the crappy part: there is nothing you can do now to change anything, you have to do what all of us have done before you and try your best to get through the next couple months without driving yourself crazy and second guessing yourself. It's done, it's over, you did your best at the time I'm sure. Take a deep breath and we can chat more if your fears are confirmed.
  15. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from mdjdot in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    girl clothes 
  16. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from trimethoprim in -   
    It is very difficult to be objective about these things and you have no idea what they are looking for in some situations. Unless you tripped coming through the door and told the interviewer that you are prejudice against all races, it probably didn't go as bad as it did in your head.
     
    I thought I blew my interview in Calgary (many years ago). They asked us to interpret a painting and I totally missed the point, There were other stations that I thought I did poorly on too but in the end they accepted me (went to a different school).
     
    Here is the crappy part: there is nothing you can do now to change anything, you have to do what all of us have done before you and try your best to get through the next couple months without driving yourself crazy and second guessing yourself. It's done, it's over, you did your best at the time I'm sure. Take a deep breath and we can chat more if your fears are confirmed.
  17. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from BoopityBoop in -   
    It is very difficult to be objective about these things and you have no idea what they are looking for in some situations. Unless you tripped coming through the door and told the interviewer that you are prejudice against all races, it probably didn't go as bad as it did in your head.
     
    I thought I blew my interview in Calgary (many years ago). They asked us to interpret a painting and I totally missed the point, There were other stations that I thought I did poorly on too but in the end they accepted me (went to a different school).
     
    Here is the crappy part: there is nothing you can do now to change anything, you have to do what all of us have done before you and try your best to get through the next couple months without driving yourself crazy and second guessing yourself. It's done, it's over, you did your best at the time I'm sure. Take a deep breath and we can chat more if your fears are confirmed.
  18. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from helicase in -   
    It is very difficult to be objective about these things and you have no idea what they are looking for in some situations. Unless you tripped coming through the door and told the interviewer that you are prejudice against all races, it probably didn't go as bad as it did in your head.
     
    I thought I blew my interview in Calgary (many years ago). They asked us to interpret a painting and I totally missed the point, There were other stations that I thought I did poorly on too but in the end they accepted me (went to a different school).
     
    Here is the crappy part: there is nothing you can do now to change anything, you have to do what all of us have done before you and try your best to get through the next couple months without driving yourself crazy and second guessing yourself. It's done, it's over, you did your best at the time I'm sure. Take a deep breath and we can chat more if your fears are confirmed.
  19. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Dr. Octavius in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    girl clothes 
  20. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Arztin in How Underrepresented Are African-Canadians In The Ontario Medical Student Cohort?   
    Thank you, I now have a new example of a leading question. 
     
    No advantage, there is no consideration for candidates based on race or ethnicity other than people who have first nations status at any school in Canada.
  21. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from trimethoprim in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    girl clothes 
  22. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from j17f in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    girl clothes 
  23. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from WomboCombo in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    Norm
  24. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Olle in Should I Go Into Computer Science To Be Better Prepared For The Future Of Medicine?   
    Ummm I would say that isn't even close to remotely true and would suggest that you major in 1) something you can do well in 2) something you enjoy 3) something you can do for a back up career
  25. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from IDoDrunkThings in What To Wear On Interview Day?   
    girl clothes 
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