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Fresh fry

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  1. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from robclem21 in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    You are hurt, understandable.
    You are frustrated, also, totally reasonable.
     
    Won't patronize you, won't pile on to the negative things you are going through right now. 
     
    No one can say anything that will make you feel better right now. Tincture of time. 
     
    If you haven't figured it out in a week (don't ask me sooner because I won't amend my time frame) from now I will give you the brutal honest truth if you PM me and ask me too. The answer was in your post.
     
    If there is a silver lining to any of this, it is that you are being presented with an opportunity to grow in a way you have probably never experienced before.
     
    Takes the hottest fires to mold the strongest steel. 
  2. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Intermediate in 24 Yrs Old, Continue 2Nd Ug Or Work?   
    I am a resident. I started undergrad at age 28, med at 31 and I have thrown everything I have at this, sacrificed my family's happiness, and have many more years to go before I am anywhere near a stable staff job.
     
    On most days I would trade this for 70 grand a year and no debt in a stable 9-5 provided I didn't treated like complete crap and I got to use my brain for at least 15 minutes a day. Every now and then though I see or do something that no other person on the planet gets to do and I am filled with awe and would gladly sacrifice it all all over again.
     
    I can't tell you it will be ok if it doesn't work out because i don't know the answer myself. What I do know, or rather the reason I don't quit on those days when everything totally sucks is because as cliched as this sounds; you only get one turn at this game and for some people not aiming for the top spot is the ultimate betrayal to oneself.    
     
    I think if you are asking strangers on a website what will make you happy you have someone you need to get better acquainted with and I would do that before i made any life decisions. 
     
    GL
  3. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from FeelingTheBern in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    Actually no, that is not what you paid for. Your (tiny) application fee was to help pay for the massive logistical effort it takes to organize, evaluate, verify, review, the as you mentioned, thousands of applications they receive per cycle. They are not there to provide you with advice or feedback and they explicitly state this when you apply. You paid for the opportunity to apply for medicine at the University of Ottawa, you were afforded exactly that. If you wanted your file reviewed and to receive feedback there are countless for-hire services that offer to do exactly that, some of which even advertise on this forum (that is not an endorsement). Whatever "sentences" the reviewers write about your file belongs to the university and there is no reasonable expectation to have access to what is essentially someone's private opinions especially when it was explicitly stated that this was the case before any money exchanged hands. 
  4. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from FeelingTheBern in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    You are hurt, understandable.
    You are frustrated, also, totally reasonable.
     
    Won't patronize you, won't pile on to the negative things you are going through right now. 
     
    No one can say anything that will make you feel better right now. Tincture of time. 
     
    If you haven't figured it out in a week (don't ask me sooner because I won't amend my time frame) from now I will give you the brutal honest truth if you PM me and ask me too. The answer was in your post.
     
    If there is a silver lining to any of this, it is that you are being presented with an opportunity to grow in a way you have probably never experienced before.
     
    Takes the hottest fires to mold the strongest steel. 
  5. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Sincere in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    You are hurt, understandable.
    You are frustrated, also, totally reasonable.
     
    Won't patronize you, won't pile on to the negative things you are going through right now. 
     
    No one can say anything that will make you feel better right now. Tincture of time. 
     
    If you haven't figured it out in a week (don't ask me sooner because I won't amend my time frame) from now I will give you the brutal honest truth if you PM me and ask me too. The answer was in your post.
     
    If there is a silver lining to any of this, it is that you are being presented with an opportunity to grow in a way you have probably never experienced before.
     
    Takes the hottest fires to mold the strongest steel. 
  6. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from GH0ST in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    Actually no, that is not what you paid for. Your (tiny) application fee was to help pay for the massive logistical effort it takes to organize, evaluate, verify, review, the as you mentioned, thousands of applications they receive per cycle. They are not there to provide you with advice or feedback and they explicitly state this when you apply. You paid for the opportunity to apply for medicine at the University of Ottawa, you were afforded exactly that. If you wanted your file reviewed and to receive feedback there are countless for-hire services that offer to do exactly that, some of which even advertise on this forum (that is not an endorsement). Whatever "sentences" the reviewers write about your file belongs to the university and there is no reasonable expectation to have access to what is essentially someone's private opinions especially when it was explicitly stated that this was the case before any money exchanged hands. 
  7. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Curiousaboutapps1 in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    You are hurt, understandable.
    You are frustrated, also, totally reasonable.
     
    Won't patronize you, won't pile on to the negative things you are going through right now. 
     
    No one can say anything that will make you feel better right now. Tincture of time. 
     
    If you haven't figured it out in a week (don't ask me sooner because I won't amend my time frame) from now I will give you the brutal honest truth if you PM me and ask me too. The answer was in your post.
     
    If there is a silver lining to any of this, it is that you are being presented with an opportunity to grow in a way you have probably never experienced before.
     
    Takes the hottest fires to mold the strongest steel. 
  8. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from RicardoKaká in We Are Governed By An Internal Policy Which Does Not Allow Us To Provide Feedback On Your Application.   
    You are hurt, understandable.
    You are frustrated, also, totally reasonable.
     
    Won't patronize you, won't pile on to the negative things you are going through right now. 
     
    No one can say anything that will make you feel better right now. Tincture of time. 
     
    If you haven't figured it out in a week (don't ask me sooner because I won't amend my time frame) from now I will give you the brutal honest truth if you PM me and ask me too. The answer was in your post.
     
    If there is a silver lining to any of this, it is that you are being presented with an opportunity to grow in a way you have probably never experienced before.
     
    Takes the hottest fires to mold the strongest steel. 
  9. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from NutritionRunner in High School Regrets/your Experience   
    First off: deep breath, everything is ok.
     
    Now, take another.
     
    You are fine. first myth: you can't use high school stuff on an application. Lie. I used my high school volunteering and it happened 10 years before I had applied (I was an older applicant). High school grades don't count for anything towards med, where they matter is in getting you into university and getting you scholarships. If ever you could slip up on a course high school is the time. No med school asks for high school grades. Your extracurriculars are great, keep at it and stay engaged in things that you love to do and get meaning from and enjoy. 
     
    The next step is obviously choosing an undergraduate program you can do well in and doing your best full time. Your undergrad grades make up the majority of your application so this is where your focus should be on, extracurriculars are important but take a back seat. been on this forum for many many years and the one mistake people make is sacrificing their GPA for an EC. Your GPA comes first and foremost and it is better to have a high GPA and no ECs than the other way around by far. It is easiest to make up for a lack of ECs than it is to play catch up on GPA. This is the most important thing you can know about the med process. YOUR GRADES ARE CRUCIAL AND NOT EASILY REPAIRED, ECS ARE THE EASY PART.
     
    Emergency medicine: don't get focused on specialty yet. Not only is it very far off but you have a 90% chance you will change your mind. I changed my mind about emerge (not that you are me) but saying that you don't have all the pieces of the story just yet. Keep working towards it by all means but know that it is the final piece of the puzzle so to say.
     
    This is a marathon not a sprint. 1) get into university 2) get good grades 3) write the MCAT in year 1 or 2 4) stay engaged in ECs you enjoy but are balanced with your studies 5) Apply to med 6) start looking at specialties.
     
    GL, welcome to the forum, don't forget to tip your waiter.
  10. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Galaxsci in High School Regrets/your Experience   
    First off: deep breath, everything is ok.
     
    Now, take another.
     
    You are fine. first myth: you can't use high school stuff on an application. Lie. I used my high school volunteering and it happened 10 years before I had applied (I was an older applicant). High school grades don't count for anything towards med, where they matter is in getting you into university and getting you scholarships. If ever you could slip up on a course high school is the time. No med school asks for high school grades. Your extracurriculars are great, keep at it and stay engaged in things that you love to do and get meaning from and enjoy. 
     
    The next step is obviously choosing an undergraduate program you can do well in and doing your best full time. Your undergrad grades make up the majority of your application so this is where your focus should be on, extracurriculars are important but take a back seat. been on this forum for many many years and the one mistake people make is sacrificing their GPA for an EC. Your GPA comes first and foremost and it is better to have a high GPA and no ECs than the other way around by far. It is easiest to make up for a lack of ECs than it is to play catch up on GPA. This is the most important thing you can know about the med process. YOUR GRADES ARE CRUCIAL AND NOT EASILY REPAIRED, ECS ARE THE EASY PART.
     
    Emergency medicine: don't get focused on specialty yet. Not only is it very far off but you have a 90% chance you will change your mind. I changed my mind about emerge (not that you are me) but saying that you don't have all the pieces of the story just yet. Keep working towards it by all means but know that it is the final piece of the puzzle so to say.
     
    This is a marathon not a sprint. 1) get into university 2) get good grades 3) write the MCAT in year 1 or 2 4) stay engaged in ECs you enjoy but are balanced with your studies 5) Apply to med 6) start looking at specialties.
     
    GL, welcome to the forum, don't forget to tip your waiter.
  11. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from FeelingTheBern in High School Regrets/your Experience   
    First off: deep breath, everything is ok.
     
    Now, take another.
     
    You are fine. first myth: you can't use high school stuff on an application. Lie. I used my high school volunteering and it happened 10 years before I had applied (I was an older applicant). High school grades don't count for anything towards med, where they matter is in getting you into university and getting you scholarships. If ever you could slip up on a course high school is the time. No med school asks for high school grades. Your extracurriculars are great, keep at it and stay engaged in things that you love to do and get meaning from and enjoy. 
     
    The next step is obviously choosing an undergraduate program you can do well in and doing your best full time. Your undergrad grades make up the majority of your application so this is where your focus should be on, extracurriculars are important but take a back seat. been on this forum for many many years and the one mistake people make is sacrificing their GPA for an EC. Your GPA comes first and foremost and it is better to have a high GPA and no ECs than the other way around by far. It is easiest to make up for a lack of ECs than it is to play catch up on GPA. This is the most important thing you can know about the med process. YOUR GRADES ARE CRUCIAL AND NOT EASILY REPAIRED, ECS ARE THE EASY PART.
     
    Emergency medicine: don't get focused on specialty yet. Not only is it very far off but you have a 90% chance you will change your mind. I changed my mind about emerge (not that you are me) but saying that you don't have all the pieces of the story just yet. Keep working towards it by all means but know that it is the final piece of the puzzle so to say.
     
    This is a marathon not a sprint. 1) get into university 2) get good grades 3) write the MCAT in year 1 or 2 4) stay engaged in ECs you enjoy but are balanced with your studies 5) Apply to med 6) start looking at specialties.
     
    GL, welcome to the forum, don't forget to tip your waiter.
  12. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Sincere in High School Regrets/your Experience   
    First off: deep breath, everything is ok.
     
    Now, take another.
     
    You are fine. first myth: you can't use high school stuff on an application. Lie. I used my high school volunteering and it happened 10 years before I had applied (I was an older applicant). High school grades don't count for anything towards med, where they matter is in getting you into university and getting you scholarships. If ever you could slip up on a course high school is the time. No med school asks for high school grades. Your extracurriculars are great, keep at it and stay engaged in things that you love to do and get meaning from and enjoy. 
     
    The next step is obviously choosing an undergraduate program you can do well in and doing your best full time. Your undergrad grades make up the majority of your application so this is where your focus should be on, extracurriculars are important but take a back seat. been on this forum for many many years and the one mistake people make is sacrificing their GPA for an EC. Your GPA comes first and foremost and it is better to have a high GPA and no ECs than the other way around by far. It is easiest to make up for a lack of ECs than it is to play catch up on GPA. This is the most important thing you can know about the med process. YOUR GRADES ARE CRUCIAL AND NOT EASILY REPAIRED, ECS ARE THE EASY PART.
     
    Emergency medicine: don't get focused on specialty yet. Not only is it very far off but you have a 90% chance you will change your mind. I changed my mind about emerge (not that you are me) but saying that you don't have all the pieces of the story just yet. Keep working towards it by all means but know that it is the final piece of the puzzle so to say.
     
    This is a marathon not a sprint. 1) get into university 2) get good grades 3) write the MCAT in year 1 or 2 4) stay engaged in ECs you enjoy but are balanced with your studies 5) Apply to med 6) start looking at specialties.
     
    GL, welcome to the forum, don't forget to tip your waiter.
  13. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from KatelynTan95 in How Do I Start? Very Lost. Appreciate Any And All Help. Thank You.   
    There are many books and resources that offer comprehensive study guides for the MCAT, it is a multi-million dollar business. As others have mentioned you do not need to take science courses and can learn the material on your own. That being said, for someone with no real science background this would be a very difficult thing to do and most people would not be up to this task. This will take a very large commitment of time and effort from you especially if you are studing for something else simultaneously.
     
    I don't want to discourage you, only prepare you for what lies ahead. I think it is possible to go from no real science knowledge to MCAT-ready in 2 years by teaching yourself using books and Khan academy, I would start with the following:
     
     
    1) look at the entirety of the MCAT and all the different sections so you know what you will have to learn
    2) make up a feasible study schedule, including when you will write practice exams, and meet learning objectives that you will make for each subject
    3) really ask yourself if you want to invest this massive amount of time into this and if this is something you really want to do.
     
    GL
     
    https://www.amazon.ca/Princeton-Review-MCAT-Subject-Complete/dp/0804126321 
  14. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Selstaar in Filing Complaint   
    I'm one of those petty people (not that you are) who pick strange hills to die on.
     
    I fought a lot of things I thought were "unfair" during med school ranging from talking to the class rep all the way to the dean, to talking to the university ethics committee.
     
    Here is what I can tell you:
     
    1) It didn't come back to me in a negative way, I matched to an extremely competitive specialty at the same school as my undergrad, I did fine on rotations, and never woke up to a horse's head in my bed. Yeah, I got some dirty looks from some admin staff but at the end of the day you were selected for this job to be an advocate and someone has to be willing to go against the grain every now and then.
     
    2) That being said I don't think I ever won a single fight, not one. As others have alluded too they are holding all of the cards and can rationalize things anyway they want and unless it is something particularly egregious no one with the power to do anything is going to lose political points to fight for you. That is just reality. So you don't get to chose your rotations, you still get to complete them, graduate on time, and are not being punished for missing months of school (something i don't understand btw but it doesn't really matter).  Yes, to you and me who know that not getting good electives can hamper our CaRMS chances, we know that this really sucks but someone was going to get those rotations anyway meaning it is possible to match with them, it just might be harder for what you are going for.
     
    I have heard of people offering thousands of dollars to switch rotations so that they can get choice electives thinking their CaRMS app totally depends on it. I have seen some people luck out completely and get the most ideal schedule and then match to something easy. None of it is "fair", but none of it is fair in the same sense that some of us lived at home and had our parents cook us food during undergrad so we could study more while others had a job. Or not fair in the sense that some people's parents are in medicine and get firends to let them shadow their kids and get them choice electives.
     
    My point is that on the microscopic level it is never "fair". It is only when you zoom out and see the big picture that it all starts to look "even", and that is what people care about, not your own personal struggles but that the system is approximately fair. No one else on this planet (besides maybe your parents and your friend who will always take your side) cares if you don't get a chance to chose your electives, that is your cross to bear. Just like the person in your class has to bear an illness while a few more have children or are making some. At the end of teh day the school will provide you with a certain number of electives before CaRMS and that is what they have established is the bear minimum.
     
    Is this fair to you? no not really
    Is it a hill you should die on? no, probably not
    Why? because as a wise man (or a character in a movie or video game, can't really remember) once said "only fight if you think you can win", 
  15. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from JohnGrisham in Should I Consider Moving To Alberta For A Year To Gain In-Province Status?   
    This is not an uncommon thing and has been done lots. This coming from an Alberta grad.
     
    If you have housing and work/school you can take advantage of here then moving to Alberta puts you at an advantage for someone in your GPA application category Personally I don't like people "gaming" the rules and they were put in place so that Alberta would be paying for people who would end up working in Alberta and not running back to Ontario/BC, but lots of people fall in love with it here, some of our Alberta home-grown grads move away, and we send people off for residency with total reckless abandon so the whole "Alberta IP preference thing" is kind of a waste anyway. 
     
    Come on down, bring a jacket and install a block heater in your car.
  16. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from LittleDaisy in Emailing For An Interview   
    Know of a few people who asked and got one, even one person who matched. I tried and was shot down but you have absolutely nothing to lose. GL
  17. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from MDtingz in Knowledge On Canadian (And Other) Health Care Systems For Interviews   
    I recall having the same concern as you and as far as I remember it has never come up during med or residency interviews. I would invest more time in Canmeds roles. Beyond knowing that we have a mostly public system where the provinces and federal government split the cost I don't think there is much else to know. Certainly no one expects you to understand referral systems or billing methods. Know that most physicians provide services on a fee for service basis but there are some who are salaried mostly at academic and smaller centers.
     
    I wouldn't rush out and take a course comparing different international systems or anything to prepare for interviews.
     
    GL
  18. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Fiatvoluntas in Almost 1/3 Of Med Students Are Depressed!   
  19. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Bambi in 4Th Year Undergrad Student Needing Some Advice   
    Take a 5th year, if you continue with your current grades you will be in middle of pack for applicants.
     
    Personally I think physician shadowing is pointless although I understand some American schools require this. Your ECs are not too bad, I wouldn't invest a bunch more time on them especially if it puts your GPA at risk.
     
    With the dollar going the way it is I don't know how anyone can afford tuition in the states. I personally wouldn't bother applying and investing all that time and effort unless you know you can pay for it and are prepared to go down that road.
     
    GL  
  20. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from WTG21 in Study Resources For Canadian Medical Schools   
    Study for what exactly?
     
    My medical school was broken down into blocks covering major systems. from what I understand this is pretty standard across the country and the only thing that varies is the order and combinations of systems covered. To study for block exams I went over my notes and the lecture slides as the exams where comprised of material taught directly from these sources. In fact the only books I bought during undergrad med were Lilly's cardio and that ECG Made Simple book, everything else was covered nicely in class and then I didn't over or understudy. 
     
    For the MCCQE 1 I read Toronto notes as this is what it was designed for. 
     
    I'm not big on text books myself but some people purchase Case Files for specific rotations like internal. I think having pocket references for some rotations can be helpful but again to study for clinical rotations I usually used the notes from lectures provided.
     
    I find with some sources, especially American ones, the emphasis is not always in the right areas and there is just so much variability in how things are practiced it is best to just go with the sources provided.
     
    My 2 cents. 
  21. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from BalkanRelations in 4Th Year Undergrad Student Needing Some Advice   
    Apply with what you have and go with your plan of re-writing but don't wait out a cycle or anything.
     
    nema nista
  22. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Sidney Crosby in Will Introvert Dentists Make Less Money Than Extrovert Ones?   
    I know it says dent but I will bite as I have an interest in the whole introvert/extrovert thing that has been going on the last few years.
     
    My thoughts: I don't think it matters.
     
    When the whole "introvert movement" started gaining ground a few years back I really started following it. This was compounded by the fact that my wife is an MBTI evaluator and she used to do practice assessments on me. I thought: this is great, finally there is a label for what I am (I always knew I was a bit weird) and there is a whole movement to normalize it. I have to admit I was really bad at first and used to use my new-found status as an introvert for an excuse. Suddenly it was OK that I didn't want to go to parties and would rather spend lunch by myself. I felt like I didn't have to try and be more extroverted anymore. That was until one day my wife explained to me that the whole introvert/extrovert/MBTI thing was designed to identify your weak points so you can work on them, not to use them as a crutch or an excuse (I know I am getting a bit off track here).
     
    This became important when I decided to pick a specialty. I, like you perhaps, thought that being an introvert would mean i should only follow certain specialties, or that I wouldn't do well in others. I ended up picking a surgical specialty (not all introverts have to go into pathology or med micro!) and although it has been difficult at times I don't think it affects my performance with patients or my earning potential. I treat every patient encounter the way my more extroverted peers do and I don't think the patients have any idea I would rather spend my life locked up in a room (with good internet access) than have to mingle at a party.
     
    That is not to say there are not challenges, man are there challenges. For me I have a ticking clock that starts whenever I leave my house that drives me to want to come home. I would almost always rather be at home or doing things that i want to do versus work. Every minute I am out in the real world I feel the pressure to want to get home and on long surgical rotations where you spend weeks (literal) at the hospital it gets really hard. Couple this with the lack of any "alone" time. I am the kind of person who needs 30 minutes to myself every now and then to get lost in a song or read something not medicine and I rarely get this as a busy resident. It is hard, but no more so than if I was doing anything else outside of med or dent that required this type of investment. When I was younger it was easier to deal with but as I get older the batteries drain faster and my patience for people goes down.
     
    I would suspect as a dentist, it is much like being a surgeon in that outside of the brief intro to clinic stuff you are mostly left to your work and I love being in the OR, I think of it almost like alone time and I am sure the dentist clinic is similar. It probably even helps you when I think about it as you are able to spend long periods of time quietly working away where as extroverted people need constant conversation and interaction.
     
    Hope this was somewhat relevant.  
  23. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Username2020 in Will Introvert Dentists Make Less Money Than Extrovert Ones?   
    I know it says dent but I will bite as I have an interest in the whole introvert/extrovert thing that has been going on the last few years.
     
    My thoughts: I don't think it matters.
     
    When the whole "introvert movement" started gaining ground a few years back I really started following it. This was compounded by the fact that my wife is an MBTI evaluator and she used to do practice assessments on me. I thought: this is great, finally there is a label for what I am (I always knew I was a bit weird) and there is a whole movement to normalize it. I have to admit I was really bad at first and used to use my new-found status as an introvert for an excuse. Suddenly it was OK that I didn't want to go to parties and would rather spend lunch by myself. I felt like I didn't have to try and be more extroverted anymore. That was until one day my wife explained to me that the whole introvert/extrovert/MBTI thing was designed to identify your weak points so you can work on them, not to use them as a crutch or an excuse (I know I am getting a bit off track here).
     
    This became important when I decided to pick a specialty. I, like you perhaps, thought that being an introvert would mean i should only follow certain specialties, or that I wouldn't do well in others. I ended up picking a surgical specialty (not all introverts have to go into pathology or med micro!) and although it has been difficult at times I don't think it affects my performance with patients or my earning potential. I treat every patient encounter the way my more extroverted peers do and I don't think the patients have any idea I would rather spend my life locked up in a room (with good internet access) than have to mingle at a party.
     
    That is not to say there are not challenges, man are there challenges. For me I have a ticking clock that starts whenever I leave my house that drives me to want to come home. I would almost always rather be at home or doing things that i want to do versus work. Every minute I am out in the real world I feel the pressure to want to get home and on long surgical rotations where you spend weeks (literal) at the hospital it gets really hard. Couple this with the lack of any "alone" time. I am the kind of person who needs 30 minutes to myself every now and then to get lost in a song or read something not medicine and I rarely get this as a busy resident. It is hard, but no more so than if I was doing anything else outside of med or dent that required this type of investment. When I was younger it was easier to deal with but as I get older the batteries drain faster and my patience for people goes down.
     
    I would suspect as a dentist, it is much like being a surgeon in that outside of the brief intro to clinic stuff you are mostly left to your work and I love being in the OR, I think of it almost like alone time and I am sure the dentist clinic is similar. It probably even helps you when I think about it as you are able to spend long periods of time quietly working away where as extroverted people need constant conversation and interaction.
     
    Hope this was somewhat relevant.  
  24. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from Dentiste in Will Introvert Dentists Make Less Money Than Extrovert Ones?   
    I know it says dent but I will bite as I have an interest in the whole introvert/extrovert thing that has been going on the last few years.
     
    My thoughts: I don't think it matters.
     
    When the whole "introvert movement" started gaining ground a few years back I really started following it. This was compounded by the fact that my wife is an MBTI evaluator and she used to do practice assessments on me. I thought: this is great, finally there is a label for what I am (I always knew I was a bit weird) and there is a whole movement to normalize it. I have to admit I was really bad at first and used to use my new-found status as an introvert for an excuse. Suddenly it was OK that I didn't want to go to parties and would rather spend lunch by myself. I felt like I didn't have to try and be more extroverted anymore. That was until one day my wife explained to me that the whole introvert/extrovert/MBTI thing was designed to identify your weak points so you can work on them, not to use them as a crutch or an excuse (I know I am getting a bit off track here).
     
    This became important when I decided to pick a specialty. I, like you perhaps, thought that being an introvert would mean i should only follow certain specialties, or that I wouldn't do well in others. I ended up picking a surgical specialty (not all introverts have to go into pathology or med micro!) and although it has been difficult at times I don't think it affects my performance with patients or my earning potential. I treat every patient encounter the way my more extroverted peers do and I don't think the patients have any idea I would rather spend my life locked up in a room (with good internet access) than have to mingle at a party.
     
    That is not to say there are not challenges, man are there challenges. For me I have a ticking clock that starts whenever I leave my house that drives me to want to come home. I would almost always rather be at home or doing things that i want to do versus work. Every minute I am out in the real world I feel the pressure to want to get home and on long surgical rotations where you spend weeks (literal) at the hospital it gets really hard. Couple this with the lack of any "alone" time. I am the kind of person who needs 30 minutes to myself every now and then to get lost in a song or read something not medicine and I rarely get this as a busy resident. It is hard, but no more so than if I was doing anything else outside of med or dent that required this type of investment. When I was younger it was easier to deal with but as I get older the batteries drain faster and my patience for people goes down.
     
    I would suspect as a dentist, it is much like being a surgeon in that outside of the brief intro to clinic stuff you are mostly left to your work and I love being in the OR, I think of it almost like alone time and I am sure the dentist clinic is similar. It probably even helps you when I think about it as you are able to spend long periods of time quietly working away where as extroverted people need constant conversation and interaction.
     
    Hope this was somewhat relevant.  
  25. Like
    Fresh fry got a reaction from coffeeisthebest in Will Introvert Dentists Make Less Money Than Extrovert Ones?   
    I know it says dent but I will bite as I have an interest in the whole introvert/extrovert thing that has been going on the last few years.
     
    My thoughts: I don't think it matters.
     
    When the whole "introvert movement" started gaining ground a few years back I really started following it. This was compounded by the fact that my wife is an MBTI evaluator and she used to do practice assessments on me. I thought: this is great, finally there is a label for what I am (I always knew I was a bit weird) and there is a whole movement to normalize it. I have to admit I was really bad at first and used to use my new-found status as an introvert for an excuse. Suddenly it was OK that I didn't want to go to parties and would rather spend lunch by myself. I felt like I didn't have to try and be more extroverted anymore. That was until one day my wife explained to me that the whole introvert/extrovert/MBTI thing was designed to identify your weak points so you can work on them, not to use them as a crutch or an excuse (I know I am getting a bit off track here).
     
    This became important when I decided to pick a specialty. I, like you perhaps, thought that being an introvert would mean i should only follow certain specialties, or that I wouldn't do well in others. I ended up picking a surgical specialty (not all introverts have to go into pathology or med micro!) and although it has been difficult at times I don't think it affects my performance with patients or my earning potential. I treat every patient encounter the way my more extroverted peers do and I don't think the patients have any idea I would rather spend my life locked up in a room (with good internet access) than have to mingle at a party.
     
    That is not to say there are not challenges, man are there challenges. For me I have a ticking clock that starts whenever I leave my house that drives me to want to come home. I would almost always rather be at home or doing things that i want to do versus work. Every minute I am out in the real world I feel the pressure to want to get home and on long surgical rotations where you spend weeks (literal) at the hospital it gets really hard. Couple this with the lack of any "alone" time. I am the kind of person who needs 30 minutes to myself every now and then to get lost in a song or read something not medicine and I rarely get this as a busy resident. It is hard, but no more so than if I was doing anything else outside of med or dent that required this type of investment. When I was younger it was easier to deal with but as I get older the batteries drain faster and my patience for people goes down.
     
    I would suspect as a dentist, it is much like being a surgeon in that outside of the brief intro to clinic stuff you are mostly left to your work and I love being in the OR, I think of it almost like alone time and I am sure the dentist clinic is similar. It probably even helps you when I think about it as you are able to spend long periods of time quietly working away where as extroverted people need constant conversation and interaction.
     
    Hope this was somewhat relevant.  
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