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Selstaar

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Everything posted by Selstaar

  1. Hey friends, For those looking to trade IM spots, there's a FB group starting up to hopefully make things easier. Join up and add your friends: https://www.facebook.com/groups/137264917179335/
  2. Hi everyone, Looking to trade IM interview slots because I'm currently triple booked. school interviewing at: Calgary specialty: IM current interview date: Jan 21 1530  date would like to switch to: Jan 14 or 18 ANY TIME school interviewing at: Alberta specialty: IM current interview date: Jan 21 0730  date would like to switch to: Jan 14 or 18 ANY TIME school interviewing at: Queens specialty: IM current interview date: Jan 18 1330  date would like to switch to: Jan 17 or Jan 22 ANY TIME
  3. Hey, Providing someone with insight into the perspectives of others who may not agree doesn't equate with being unsupportive. I agree with you...it's necessary to validate concerns. But it's pretty easy to wind up only listening to those who reaffirm your worries...and, in this case, a lot of those will wind up being people who declined their offer to the Mississauga campus and don't have the experiences necessary to provide fully informed perspectives regarding the challenges you'll incur. OP, you're right. Commuting to and from school will wind up having an impact on your emotional and physical health and wellness. Same with the challenges of moving to a new city if that's what you wind up doing. So will medical school. And, you would face them even if you'd been admitted to the downtown campus. I think the next four years and frankly, the rest of your career will wind up revolving around deciding which pains you're most willing to endure. robclem mentioned that everyone worked hard. OP worked hard as well. And, I think more so than the pressures employed by anyone else, the primary driver should be their wants and the experience they feel their efforts have earned them.
  4. First, congrats on the NSERC and on the invites! It must be pretty exciting. I love you sunnyy, but I would say take the NSERC anyway. I was in a similar situation last year with another granting agency that wanted my entire summer. I simply negotiated with my supervisor to put in a couple of extra hours some days a week and easily got the month off. I got the more valuable and prestigious award, and I got the time I needed to come out with a good set of deliverables. The experience is important...but so is giving yourself enough time to get the most bang for your buck in terms of learning and outcomes.
  5. I get what you're saying though. It's frustrating knowing you underperformed for reasons out of your control. I was in a similar situation when I was applying. Ultimately, I decided not to write an academic explanation...the effect my underperforming had on my cGPA wasn't egregious to begin with, and I'm always of the opinion not to draw any negative attention to an application. TBH...3.9 is a good spot to be in with Toronto. By no means subpar. If your apps as strong as you feel it is, you'll find your way in here.
  6. Agree with robclem21. BTW, he wants to know who your greatest inspiration is.
  7. Hey, I was in at Penn and waitlisted at WashU in St. Louis. A friend of mine was rejected post-interview at Harvard. Both of us are currently at Toronto. From an academic standpoint, I think I echo a lot of what's been said here. A high GPA and MCAT can go a long way to getting your foot through the door. For example, my friend had a 35, and a 4.0 AMCAS GPA. When I was applying, my AMCAS GPA was 3.96, with a 31. My MCAT was lower than a number of the schools I applied/ got in to. So, one may be able to compensate for the other due to the more holistic approach a lot of the schools take to evaluating apps. Also note that your CGPA may be higher in the US due to different weighting schemes. EC-wise, I don't think I can be much help. Each application is...unique. So, I don't think there's really a secret sauce that made us stand out. She did a lot of international aid work, helping rebuild in New Orleans post-Katrina, and in Haiti. She was also a rockstar pianist. My experiences were mostly local, working with under-served and immigrant populations, and some national and international competitions in sports and business, respectively. Even though we had really different experiences, I think we were both able to put together a cohesive narrative about who we are, what lead us to medicine and why this was the schools we got into were a good fit for us to study med. You get like 15 spaces to write like 200-300 words about all your extracurriculars, your motivations for getting involved, and what you took away. You also get about 800 words to give them your big med spiel. That's a lot of writing. And, I think the quality of the writing and the story you tell are HUGE factors when it comes to this stuff. You should make sense on the page, and they should be able to see you and what you care about. I read a paper a while back that said the three big questions med schools try to answer throughout admissions processes are: (1) Can you do it? - Can you cope with the essential work of medicine (demonstrated through GPA, MCATs, academic awards, etc.) (2) Should you do it? - Are your activities and descriptions consistent with values and motivations conducive to becoming a good physician. (3) Should you do it here? - Decided at the interview. Are you a good fit? Try working to address the questions in this order. PM me if you've got any questions.
  8. I think it's also important to note that this cutting thing always happens. Governments always try to deal with high healthcare spending by cutting investments in manpower or hours. It swings back eventually.
  9. I think you make a good point here. I certainly know of people in my program who are either currently unemployed (in nursing) or just getting their first nursing jobs as we speak. Others do find themselves underemployed, precariously employed or working on multiple wards/in multiple institutions to make a living. Cuts have played a big part of this. But a number of factors have as well. The new licensing exam introduced this year has had unprecedented failure rates (well over 30% for graduates of some schools). People typically spend 2-3 months in the summer studying for this thing, and any delay in licensing will end up affecting the time to being hired. Same will the time of the year people are applying for these jobs. Thinking about it reasonably, come April/June, you've got thousands of new nurses all looking for entry level jobs...this is certainly different than if you were applying on a muggy Tuesday. The places you're looking for jobs also have a role to play...a lot of people are keen on moving to places like the downtown core for work where things are more saturated than a Norfolk Gen for example. And, even the clinical area makes things tough at times (e.g. peds/l&d vs. everything else). There a number of ways people work around these obstacles. The licensing exam is a doozy, but some people begin their studying earlier in the year to cut down on time they spend in the summer studying. With regard to application time, some people from my program chose to finish a full-semester early in order to beat the job market influx I talked about. Other people select rotations so they build extensive clinical experiences in their specialty area and have chances to build relationships in different places...for example, I had friends who did three or four stints in cardio and mental health, so they had very little trouble convincing people they could work on the units. And, some people bite the bullet and choose to save their dream hospitals for later on in their careers. Ugh, I'm really sorry about your friend. I know a few people who are in similar positions, and it's immensely frustrating to watch and hear about.
  10. OP, A lot of great stuff has been said already. Please, heed said advice. I'll just try to add onto or reiterate a few nuggets, I encountered along the way. (1) It's possible to do extremely well in nursing school. (2) In order to do well in nursing school, something different is required from you than a typical premed. In addition to acing multiple choice tests and mastering short-answer questions, you've got to be able to write well (subjective essay grading and all), communicate orally (subjective presentation grading and all), and acquire/build on a solid clinical skill-set (objectively structured clinical exams and all). When people talk about nursing as a GPA killer, I think it's usually that they keep taking hits because of the inability to do one of these things well. (3) It's hard to do well in nursing school, if you hate the essential work of nursing. I think this applies really to any other area of life actually. I think it behooves you to figure out exactly what you're getting yourself into before you sign up for 3-4 years of a BScN, and possibly years of work after that. (4) If you do wind up studying nursing, you will need to do extra work to make yourself eligible/competitive. Clinical experience doesn't suffice; your application will need to stand out as much as the other kids through paid work experience, awards/scholarships, research, etc. You'll need to take summer courses, most likely to fulfill prerequisites...and even then some of the MCAT subject matter will feel like a foreign language. (5) You will need to try and find mentors who are truly supportive of your dream. The very first day of school, one of my profs sat her small group down and said "there are always some people in the class who are thinking of this as a stepping stone or backup to med school; I usually try to weed those people out first". This stuff happens. Be wary. Be smart. It's easy to say that people coming from baccalaureate science programs have greater success on medical school applications than people coming from nursing and other health professional undergraduates. But, admissions stats typically speak of where matriculants came from rather than applicants. In my first year, it felt like every other person wanted to go to medical school in my program...or was sorta thinking about it. By our final year, only a handful of us still wanted it, and the ones that applied all got in. The rest had truly fallen in love with nursing and everything it had to offer...or law...or research. It's a beautiful thing, and I'm quite proud of all of them.
  11. Sorry about that. I didn't mean to come across so prickly. The "save yourself an eye-roll" comment just floored me a bit.
  12. It's pretty arrogant and pretentious for anyone on here who hasn't sat on an adcom or been intimately involved with the admissions process to comment so brazenly about what is and isn't valued. OP, I'd take whatever you read on here with a grain of salt, that's the first piece of advice I'll give you. Second, is something I learned applying last year: your ABS or sketch is all about how you feel you're best represented. I filled up all slots in my OMSAS app and included stuff that I'd done in high school (including my subject awards). By contrast, two of my colleagues left only filled out 15 and 27 of those slots; the former, included stuff they'd done since childhood while the latter focused predominantly on undergrad activities. They still wound up sitting beside me in class. Personally, if you have space, and you think it best represents you, I'd include all of them. Medal - Coming top of your class is generally no small feat, and you're right, it helps establish a track record of hard work and success. Vale - Being class valedictorian shows that you play nicely with others and that you did stuff in highschool; but it also evidences that your peers trusted you to be their voice in what was a really important time for them. It's a big deal. Awards - I would combine all of the subject awards to save space.
  13. Most people aren't aware that the 3.96 is after weighting though. No fear.
  14. Hey, Hard as the cutoffs may be, there's at least one person in our class who fell below the minimum in a section by a point and wound up getting in. If you think you're a strong candidate, you've got the essays written and you've got the money, I'd consider it worth it to apply...especially given that you heard it from the horse's mouth that they wouldn't de facto toss your app. Go for it! P.S. I don't think they wrote an 'extenuating circumstance' essay either.
  15. I'm really glad that people are posting their stats in this thread. The U.S. system can be such a black box and I think even just this basic stuff helps when people are developing their lists of schools or assessing their competitiveness Cycle: 2014-2015 cGPA: 3.95 sGPA: 3.90 aoGPA: 3.98 MCAT: 31 (10/10/11) Applied: Brown, Cornell, Columbia, Dartmouth, Duke, Yale, UPenn, Hopkins, Stanford, Mount Sinai, Northwestern, NYU, WashU in St. Louis, Howard, SLU, Penn State, New York Medical College, Rosalind Franklin, Jefferson, Tulane, Wayne State, Boston, Einstein Interviewed: NYU, NYMC, WashU, Jefferson; Wayne State (Declined), Penn State (Declined) Accepted: NYU, NYMX, Jefferson Waitlisted: WashU
  16. TIME STAMP: 10:14 AM, May 12, 2015 Interview Date: February 21, 2015 Result: Accepted!!!! cGPA: 3.91 wGPA: N/A MCAT: 10/10/11 ECs: Paid and volunteer work with newcomer populations; high school sports at the national level; business competitions at the international; tutoring since highschool; university committees; exec & pres on a few clubs; choirs since highschool; lab research assistant; clinical research; principal investigator on a funded project; first author pub; awards for research, academics, and community service. Essays: Composed the week before they were due. LOTS of effort put into them. Drew a lot from the stuff put on my ABS. Edited multiple times by my two best friends. Both phenomenal writers and they knew me best. Satisfied at the end of the day. Interview: Loved the MPI format! My interviewers were all relaxed and I definitely felt like they got to see my personality shine through the interview. Stumbled on one station, but I think everyone had at least one that gave them a little bit of trouble. Year: 4th year UG
  17. You guys touch on a number of KT challenges today and I hope I can contribute a little to the discussion. First, though the evidence-practice gap and the push for evidence-based medicine have been acknowledged in the literature for decades, the translation of evidence into practice is evidence into practice is complicated by a number of things: (1) KT is still a relatively nascent field, that's heavily theory driven. This means (1) there isn't an abundance of theories on how to best translate research findings into clinical practice and (2) there isn't a lot of robust empirical data supporting any given approach. This results in a lot of people paying no more than lip service to KT and evidence-based practice. (2) Some professions have repeatedly (and quite dubiously) reported high research use in clinical practice for decades, making it difficult to truly ascertain to what extent KT efforts are making a dent in transforming practice. (3) Changes in health systems and their impacts on patient outcomes can really only be assessed longitudinally. This is problematic for governments and, sometimes decision-makers who have to make decisions based on what they think will make them appear to be doing something to fix things in the here and now (at least if they want to be re-elected). There's at least one systematic review out there suggesting that governments end up disregarding health services data when it comes down to decision-making (for a number of reasons which we shouldn't discuss here). (4) Like you mention medhope15, there are also contextual barriers to KT. The stem from sources running the gamut from individual training, attitudes and preferences...to disciplinary (i.e., health professional) culture...to unit and organizational culture...and sometimes even systems issues. I may have drunk the EBM koolaid in my time at Mac. However, I think others who haven't would agree with me in saying it'd be erroneous to alter practice based on one RCT...no matter how well designed. Or even a sole, methodologically sound meta-analysis. But, I agree with some of the opinions already stated about how it's the responsibility of physicians and other healthcare professionals to drive the change we want to see in practice and in the healthcare system at large. We need to get involved in policy decision-making; We need to get involved in government; We need to be there in administrative positions ready to facilitate implementation, and We have a responsibility to continue to develop KT as a science.
  18. I actually LOLed when I read this. I sincerely hope you were kidding. I think it'd be erroneous to summarily reject or disregard any sort of advice from working professionals in medicine or even healthcare in general for no reason other than their failure to tell you ONLY that which you want to hear...especially given that the health professions are so difficult to try before you buy. I think part of coming to a holistic understanding of who you are and why you want to do this is to let the dissent and doubt creep in even a little bit. If the only thing you can say is that other people told you not to be a doc and you just ignored them, how do you know within yourself that you've really thought about what the implications of this career path would have for your life and what alternatives you have available to you to make you happy. My advice to you here would be to find some way within you to come to respect the position that others have come to by virtue of their experiences and rational minds. To question this a little bit, honestly...for your sake at least. And, even to inquire a bit further about what is it about you that makes them think you're not cut out or that you could do better somewhere else or whatever it is. I speak from experience here. I know it can be quite discouraging. When I started my application, the pushback came from my parents and best friends (both my parents are in healthcare). At the end of the day, questioning my decision made me surer than I've ever been about this being for me. It also made for quite the interesting story at panel interviews.
  19. Uhh...Hasn't Toronto gone on record saying that geographic status is a major determinant of interview date? As in, you live close, it would take less time for you to figure out how to get here, so show up on March XX? Also, I think anyone who gets an interview at Toronto (or any Ontario medical school) has to have a lot of amazing stuff going on with their app. I don't think someone sits down and says: he has a 63 summed score...let's invite him before Queens gets him.
  20. Not to be a dick here...but I'm kind of curious as to what kind of friend you have that would let you micromanage her career in this way? And, why you insist on indulging her? And, further, on afflicting the kind ladies and gents of PM101 with this stuff? Like StriveP mentioned, it may be a bad idea to suggest that someone with little passion for science, healthcare, or medicine, specifically go through an often discouraging selection-process and a rigorous and lengthy training process thereafter. There are probably far more efficient ways to realize her aspirations. And, I think you might help her best by asking her questions that help her clarify what they even are. For example, there are three branches of government (see: http://www.canada.ca/en/gov/system/). Where she wants to go within this system may help determine if her next steps include grabbing a JD or interning on someone's campaign in the next election etc. There are a lot of people out there who read perfectly well and are personable enough to do well on CASPers and MMIs. However, I'm sure you'd agree with me when I say that someone's being capable of doing something is not a good enough reason for them to do it....particularly if you've got overwhelming evidence to suggest that they'd rather do something else and that they just don't know how to do it yet.
  21. TIME STAMP: 4:20 on Jan 29TH Result: Invite!!! wGPA: 3.91 (Didn't qualify for weighting) MCAT: 10/10/11 (PS/VR/BS) ECs: Paid and volunteer work with newcomer populations; high school sports at the national level; business competitions at the international; tutoring since highschool; university committees; exec & pres on a few clubs; choirs since highschool; lab research assistant; clinical research; principal investigator on a funded project; first author pub; awards for research, academics, and community service. Essays: Composed the week before they were due. LOTS of effort put into them. Drew a lot from the stuff put on my ABS. Edited multiple times by my two best friends. Both phenomenal writers and they knew me best. Satisfied at the end of the day. Year: 4TH Year UG
  22. Invite Date Stamp: 28/01/2015 - 10:38 AM Location: OOO, IP Stream: English wGPA: Either 3.91 OR 3.95 ECs: Paid and volunteer work with newcomer populations; high school sports at the national level; business competitions at the international; tutoring; university committees; exec & pres on a few clubs; choirs; lab research assistant; clinical research; principal investigator on a funded project; first author pub; awards for research, academics, and community service Year: 4TH Year UG
  23. Long time lurker. Recent poster. Really hope this helps someone out. TIME STAMP: 10:20 Result: Invite wGPA: 3.91 MCAT: 10/10/11 (PS/VR/BS) ECs: A little diverse but I’ll try. Paid and volunteer work with newcomer populations; high school sports at the national level; business competitions at the international; tutoring; university committees; exec & pres on a few clubs; choirs; lab research assistant; clinical research; principal investigator on a funded project; first author pub; awards for research, academics, and community service; Year: 4TH Year UG Incredibly honoured to be considered.
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