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mononoke

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  1. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from MomInMed in UofT Resident: MCCQE Tutoring   
    I am currently a UofT resident and previous UofT medical school graduate. This year, I also got the opportunity to tutor some colleagues who were second-attempt takers for the MCCQE 1, and I was able to help them study for common types of questions that tend to repeat with each exam, confusing PHELO scenarios, and questions that might seem 'random' (but are not so random if you have clinical experience). 
    I am familiar with the new format of the exam and will share all my study materials free of charge if I tutor you (these materials alone probably costs hundreds of dollars). 
    My score was 293 (pass score 226). I have scored above average in all categories with highest performance in Psychosocial & Professional Behaviours sections. I find people tend to think the Professional behaviours questions are the most 'random' but I have a lot of clinical experience in public health/ethics so this was my strongest section.
    Rates: $70/hour
    Available through Google Hangouts, Zoom, Phone call or In-Person.
    Send me a DM if you're interested and we can chat about how I can best help you!
     
  2. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from Redpill in Surgical specialties with good job prospects?   
    It's not as bad in Emerg because right now the demand is still there, I know of several CCFP+1 ER who are working in GTA and academic centres downtown as staff. In surgery the job market is tighter hence why some are doing CAs
  3. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from Aetherus in UofT Resident: MCCQE Tutoring   
    I am currently a UofT resident and previous UofT medical school graduate. This year, I also got the opportunity to tutor some colleagues who were second-attempt takers for the MCCQE 1, and I was able to help them study for common types of questions that tend to repeat with each exam, confusing PHELO scenarios, and questions that might seem 'random' (but are not so random if you have clinical experience). 
    I am familiar with the new format of the exam and will share all my study materials free of charge if I tutor you (these materials alone probably costs hundreds of dollars). 
    My score was 293 (pass score 226). I have scored above average in all categories with highest performance in Psychosocial & Professional Behaviours sections. I find people tend to think the Professional behaviours questions are the most 'random' but I have a lot of clinical experience in public health/ethics so this was my strongest section.
    Rates: $70/hour
    Available through Google Hangouts, Zoom, Phone call or In-Person.
    Send me a DM if you're interested and we can chat about how I can best help you!
     
  4. Thanks
    mononoke got a reaction from throwaway756 in Extremely embarrassed to be asking this question but would really appreciate the advice   
    Hi OP,  it's good that you posted this because I was in a similar situation when I started medical school and found out someone who had bullied me in elementary and junior high school would be in the same class. 
    As Lactic Folly has said, don't decline your offer - you worked hard for it, go to class and channel your experience into being a better, more relatable doctor. You will see lots of patients on peds, psych, and family med who experience lots of bullying themselves. 
    Even if the class is small, for the most part people are friendly and you will find your own group. The medical programs tend to take harassment from peers seriously and because of the fear of getting a 'red flag', students tend to be outwardly professional for the most part. 
    People mature, and so have you - let go of the past and focus not on what others think of you but on how you can be the better person. 
     
  5. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from brady23 in Addictions med: family or psych?   
    What is the difference between doing addictions from family med or psych? For example, is there a big difference in billings or scope of practice?
    How big of an issue are no-shows when it comes to this patient population?
  6. Like
    mononoke reacted to rmorelan in When to use tuition tax credits?   
    You aren't working for the school, you are working for the hospital. It is still stupid. At least before with the old tax credits I didn't mind as much - I paid 700 so was a full time student, and then got another year of tax credits with was more than the tuition all said and done so came out well ahead in the end. Now it is just another hit as they dropped those credits. At least I made it to 5th year under the old way. 
    I view the LOC in a sense the same way - it is one of the reasons I don't have any bonds right now. "Investing" in the LOC is the same as buying a bond with the same after tax interest rate (which in my tax bracket is like finding a bond with something like a 5% return guaranteed). Not even a low risk bond - it is a zero risk bond ha. Similarly if you are investing as a resident in bonds and yet still have an LOC then the math doesn't make sense (although again you might be doing for just the practice side of things I suppose....err I still think it wouldn't be logical)
    Nice work by the way on the savings. That rate, in that year, is quite impressive. As you mention the BOC is hoping to raise rates - the original goal was twice more this year. A lot to medical students/residents are going to start feeling the pain if they get much higher - one of the reasons paying down on the LOC is not a bad idea.
    Wealthsimple is actually an interesting alternative to traditional banks etc. One one hand their fees are so much lower (about 40% of the banks or even better). I like that - and robo investing fits in with index approach. On the other hand that is still 10x higher than directly buying the index funds and doing the work yourself once or twice a year (which takes about 15 mins to do at most). I also don't fully understand why people won't just use wealthsimple to get the portfolio combination and then just use that information to build there own (except for the convenience factor). Regardless it is still massively better than buying mutual funds. 
    Ha if I am not careful people are going to think this is a financial blog - We are still here to help people get into medical school and so forth
     
  7. Like
    mononoke reacted to rmorelan in When to use tuition tax credits?   
    and just for transparency I am a 5th year resident who has made significant (ha in my mind at my level) stock investments over the past 5 years which I have balanced against some LOC repayment (actually am one of those people at 100% stocks). I also have purchased an investment property as well during residency in first year with hopes of expanding there. I also have full disability insurance, ample room on the LOC and now home equity credit line to shield myself in case something comes up, but that seems unlikely with my current relatively high savings rate. 
    Points is that is the plan that works for me and helps me further learn what I wanted to know. It is what I personally figured works for me....and yeah I sleep like a rock (while when I am not on call )
     
  8. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from FailureToThrive in Can You Apply To 3 Different Competitive Specialties?   
    I know of people who applied to rads+derm, as well as opth+anes, they matched to one of the two
  9. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from luciferase in Book recommendations   
    The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells - it's a memoir that also touches on poverty and mental health
  10. Like
    mononoke reacted to ellorie in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    To be honest, the most useful response to someone who says that they are unhappy about anything in life is almost never "well, many people would want to be in your position right now."
    Medicine sucks sometimes.  I personally am mid-PGY3 and swinging through a burned out "this sucks and I hate it" phase, and sort of wishing I'd been a clinical psychologist instead and avoided all this garbage (though no career is without garbage, obviously).
    Trying to tap back in to all of the non-cynical things I wrote in this exact thread.  Sometimes we all just have to show up for each other and see how we can make this profession better.
  11. Like
    mononoke reacted to ralk in Ever Feel Like Med School Is A Big Rich Kids Club?   
    One thing I hope all posters and readers remember is that when it comes to discussions of advantage vs disadvantage for getting into medical school, the arguments being made (at least the valid ones) are probabilistic, not deterministic. Canada is indeed a place of opportunity, where almost anyone can become a physician. And, it is one of sufficient meritocracy that individuals with every conceivable advantage are not guaranteed to become physicians either. Yet, it remains a place where some groups are far, far more likely to become physicians than others, without clear differences in merit.
    Likewise, when it comes to compassion towards patients, especially disadvantaged ones, and having reasonable perspective to treat these patients, there is nothing that says physicians with privileged upbringings cannot be as competent as their less-advantaged - or even that every less-advantaged physician is necessarily strong in these regards - but merely that those who come from privilege are less likely to understand and relate to those patients under their care (and there is research to back up such an assertion).
    Applying definitive statements to individuals is therefore inappropriate. Maybe a particular individual is a jerk to patients because they grew up with a silver spoon in their mouth. Maybe they're just a jerk and would have been either way. Maybe a person from a lower SES background would have gotten into medical school if they were born to a wealthier family, but there's no guarantee of that. This thread has started trending towards discussion of individuals and that's not really appropriate or useful. We can't apply much meaning to individual circumstances because each individual's path is too complicated to effectively parse out and we can't redo their lives to determine how that path would have changed. What we can do is talk about groups. Any structural, policy, or societal changes that occur would be targeted on a group level, not towards individuals. There are actions the medical community could take collectively to encourage more socioeconomic diversity among physicians - or at least better perspectives on socioeconomic status among physicians - that we have yet to do. And, contrary to Cain's rather defeatist assertion, complaining about it may be one of the better ways to push for such changes.
  12. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from Lactic Folly in Ever Feel Like Med School Is A Big Rich Kids Club?   
    http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2649192
    Read this @premed989 , I feel like it covers a lot of the points you've made and puts it in a different perspective. I'm also not as rich compared to some people in my class and agree with you that it's unfair sometimes...hopefully schools will start to take notice and make some changes to support less advantaged students
  13. Like
    mononoke reacted to ellorie in Does med school change people's personality for the better or the worse?   
    Yeah my first day of clerkship my resident left me at the nursing station, told me he would come back for me, and never did. I went home and cried. 
  14. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from ThatMedGyal in Value Of Volunteering   
    I feel that volunteer work, especially those that you enjoy is good for your emotional well being. I used to get 90s in first year, but I literally only worked and did nothing else - no exercise, barely any clubs, no class parties, mostly b/c I perceived my class to be very intelligent and I needed to put in that extra effort to keep up to them. However working ALL the time is extremely draining but 1 year later, I probably remember only 30-50% of it. Now, I'm spending more time doing volunteer work and though my marks aren't as high as before, I feel like my med school experience has more 'substance' to it. 
    Sometimes patients might ask me about how med school is going, and instead of telling them about the exams I just had or the glasgow coma scale I memorized last night, I could tell them about my volunteer experiences.
     
    It's definitely important to work hard and it's a lot of work to get 90s but at the end of the day, it's just as important to be a 'relatable' person than a walking textbook. 
  15. Like
    mononoke reacted to silvantes in 2017 Carms Applicants   
    The other caveat to the "Apply broadly" is the assumption that simply applying for the interview is enough. It's already fairly well known that one of the main determining factors for getting an interview is if you've done an elective at the school (ideally in the specialty as well). So it's not just "apply broadly" but also "Elective broadly", which is quite the costly venture, which ultimately boils down to a feeling of "Throw enough money at it to hopefully secure your future".
     
    Due to financial stress I had a difficult time traveling much for my electives, and as such when I did "apply broadly" to Radiology (with backups, and extremely broad application in second iteration) I did not receive the favorable response I was hoping for when it came time to interview. Overall the system itself is a complex eldritch beast that swallows everything you put into it and may or may not yield the result you hope for. In similar fashion there isn't much you can do about it when it doesn't yield that result but rail at the system (quietly, as if you raise too much of a raucous you risk damaging your chances of matching in the future) and then getting lost in the veil of academia.
     
    I can't speak to other unmatched students' experiences but at my program I basically received a placating head pat with "That sucks man, better luck next time", words of consolation, and no actual support put forth for the coming year. My program doesn't have a fifth year option, and the culmination of advise I got was "we'll have a look at your application with you to improve it if you want" (which I am grateful for as I appreciate all help towards the end goal at this point), "Maybe you should look at less competitive things, even though there's nothing that stands out wrong on your application" and "Well go hunt down some supervisors and apply for a masters, either via our school or another University".
     
    I bear no ill will towards my program as a whole, but it does seem like there could be a lot better support measures in place for -IF- this happens (instead of the attitude of "oh it doesn't happen often enough for us to worry about it").
     
    As to a constructive response to address the problem, the government's repeated meddling with primary care physicians and how they practice is definitely a major turn off for primary care (all around and personally). In NB they have been speaking for the past few years about setting a hard limit on how much family docs can bill for (regardless of how much work you actually do. You hit limit and then keep seeing patients for free or close up shop for the rest of the year {Obviously not the ethical response}). Another issue being from what I've heard, is that they're roping more and more family docs into having to do call and be associated with the hospitalist services here because in order to obtain a billing number you as a new family doc you have to be associated with the hospital (that one I'm a bit less 100% on, but I know there were some recent issues with our psychiatry department regarding that issue). So, for my suggestion it'd be lobbying for limitations on how much government can manipulate family doc practices (acquiescing that this is a much harder thing to achieve in practice, and that there may or may not be valid reasons for some of the government involvement).
  16. Like
    mononoke reacted to Hammmmmy in Uoft's Free Mcat Course   
    I can answer some questions about this prep course. I got accepted into it a few days ago.


    So this program is open to everyone. PhD students, Masters students, graduated students and undergraduates. There is no selection for a particular cohort though they may have quotas. Not sure.
     
     
    My cGPA wasn't spectacularly high. It's below 3.9 so I don't think they emphasize the GPA aspect of it a lot. I think what got me in though was my personal statement. The personal statement is there for you to talk about your interest in medicine, the program and any other things they should be aware of in 250 words. I think my response really made up for the fact that I didn't have an excellent GPA. Also, there may not have been a competitive cohort applying. I did struggle in my first and second years in undergrad so the fact that I got in must mean that they are considerate of my GPA. 

    A lot of it is self-prep. Prep companies provide you with their books and tools to get ready but here (or from my understanding of it) it is you bringing questions to the group or material to the group. Prep is done through suggestions between the group. 
  17. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from InstantRamen in Uoft's Free Mcat Course   
    yeah I would agree picking based on GPA is hard, those who might have higher GPAs to begin with might end up doing better on the MCAT regardless of if they took a course or not. I don't know what they mean by 'high potential' as a criteria but I do think it's important for it to include upward trend
     
    mcat courses and even those med applications consulting services are getting ridiculously expensive, it's definitely important to have initiatives like these to level the field for everyone
  18. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from daftjustice in In Toronto For The Summer - Would Love To Shadow Fm While I'm There   
    I would recommend Azi Moaveni, she's a great teacher, really enthusiastic, and great about sharing career advice!
  19. Like
    mononoke reacted to westcoastgirl in My Experiences Being Unmatched   
    Hey LittleDaisy,
     
    I matched to my top choice family program this year! I'm very excited and happy about it! I decided that I didn't want to be identifiable by my blog so I'm just going to say that last year I applied to two very competitive specialties (but broadly, to all the English programs for both).
     
    I got interviews last year, but not a ton. Over this year and after lots of reflection, I decided not to apply to one of the specialties (and this is actually one of the big reasons I am happy I didn't match last year! I don't think I would have been happy in that field). I did apply to the other one and got one interview, but it was actually a bit of a toss up as to whether I wanted that or family more by the end.
     
    This year I did a masters program (I think a lot of medical schools also have one year masters available), worked clinically with family docs and specialists (like part-time rotations), and worked on a research project I'm now getting ready to submit for publication. There's TONS you can do with the year off! I know people who found a doc to work with and pretty much worked with them full time, another who started an MBA (I think that's a 2 year program so I don't think they finished it) or did other cool online master's, people who went on big trips, and people who got really involved in research. My advice is to figure out what you want in your career and how you can use this year to strengthen it. I enjoy clinical research and want to stay involved in it, which is why I picked the masters program I did.
     
    I'm more than happy to point people in the direction of resources if they like! Or answer any questions. I have a contact page on my blog.
  20. Like
    mononoke reacted to Bambi in Why Bother With Extracurriculars?   
    My reply is related to med school applications generally, not for any specific school to which this may not apply.
     
    Medical schools are not interested in a brain in a box. Without CanMEDS competencies, without communication skills, leadership, advocacy et al., you are essentially a brain in a box, and they are not interested in such persons. The reasons schools are looking for those who take a full course load and are involved in active citizenship are they are seeking those students who demonstrate academic excellence with a rigorous course load AND are active within their community contributing to it. I know such students who were refused acceptance because despite having all this, their communication skills were below par, they were unable to think quickly on their feet in solving problems. 
     
    I got into medical school on my first attempt with only the MMI. I did no preparation because I went in with the attitude that I had prepared for the MMI my entire lifetime. My life experiences had prepared me in my view and I went in to have fun. Now, let's examine some of my ECs and volunteering. I was involved in emergency medical response for years, starting out as a trainee and ultimately, training others. I dealt with injuries due to vehicle traffic accidents  attempted suicides, heart attacks, strokes, carbon monoxide poisoning, diabetic shock, etc. and had to maintain calmness, be professional, act swiftly and with developed expertise, was responsible for training others. In the performing arts for years, I went form ugly duckling to swan, I developed poise, coordination, patience, collaboration skills, expertise, learned to be calm in stressful situation, performed competitively too, I performed in public for years, including for the elderly, I taught others in my group. I was involved in sales for years where the first thing I had to do was to attain the trust of a total stranger so the person would listen to me and be interested in buying the product after I made a meaningful sales pitch describing the benefits. I was the top salesperson for years and trained others. This is all to say that when I went into a MMI, it was like a fun game, I was clam, friendly, communicative, quick thinking, an ethical problem solver. It was a fun experience for which my life experiences had prepared me my entire life. I was not tongue tied, nervous, at a loss for words, I did not suffer from performance anxiety, it was easier than my many life experiences.
     
    I discovered that the busier I was, the more efficient I became. When in rehearsing, during breaks, I would take my laptop and do an assignment. I used my time to advantage always. I learned to be a multi-tasker. All this was excellent for medicine.
     
    In undergrad, I became a self learner. So, I skipped many lectures when I knew I could learn more efficiently on my own. I was a straight A student, so my method worked for me. And in med school, I did not attend any of the lectures, rather I scanned the lecture notes that were provided which I could do quicker than attending the lectures and I used the time to study on my own. All to say, that I had an open approach to life which I think I learned from my ECs - which positively impacted upon my studies and my approach to studying.
     
    So, you ask why ECs. Simply, to prepare you for life, to expose you to all sorts of experiences with transferable skills, to develop communication skills, to learn active listening, to be sensitive to body language. I am a relatively small female. I learned to ride a horse and went into jumping. It is not an easy task to control an animal many times your size and weight. They sense fear, if you have any. You learn to control the animal, to read body language, you develop confidence in yourself. Now, I am a surgical resident. I am constantly learning, especially in the O.R. when I do new procedures. I love challenges and look forward to new procedures! When on breaks, I go on adventure mini vacations where I experience new challenging sports for the first time, be it scuba diving with the sharks or skiing down what others might consider dangerous hills. Be it professionally or personally, I am active, fearless, enjoy life and enjoy pushing myself. I have never been the brightest light bulb in the class nor have I ever sought to be. I am comfortable in my own skin and love new experiences that push the envelope. Overall, I am reasonably intelligent but far from brilliant, I am a hard worker, enthusiastic, friendly, collaborative, easy to get along with, a good communicator and it is these skills that got me acceptance into my surgical residency. I am far from being a brain in a box. I am engaged in life as an active participant - which is what they are looking for. 
     
    Had I no ECs/volunteering, I would have been shy, reclusive, a poor communicator and this would have worked against me during my interviews. Having been forced to problem solve on my feet for many years, the MMI was just another fun experience, not really a test for me. I hope I have given you some insight. Good luck!   
  21. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from a7x in 2017 Carms Match Results!   
    rad onc seems not to be very popular this year
     
    and what's up with ottawa derm? how can it not be filled?
  22. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from bentobox1234 in Matching To Psych   
    I would suggest you participate in the Psyc Summer Institute, if you're a UofT student you will get an email about it. It's only for 1 week in the summer and you get to see various types of psyc practices and the lectures are quite interesting!
  23. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from Heisencat in Matching To Psych   
    I would suggest you participate in the Psyc Summer Institute, if you're a UofT student you will get an email about it. It's only for 1 week in the summer and you get to see various types of psyc practices and the lectures are quite interesting!
  24. Like
    mononoke reacted to Keith Wycliffe-Jones in Quality Of Calgary Fm Training?   
    Hi everyone
    Replying to this as PG FM Director in Calgary...hope thats OK?
     
    1) re  subsequent competence after grad. As we move forward with competency-based education and focus more on outcomes, this is absolutely the question we should be asking(and answering) for all residency programs.Its actually tricky to meaure though. We recently ran a small pilot project here comparing just 2 quality indicators(BP mx and A1C) for patients of Calgary grads with non Calgary grads practicing in AB.We found no difference. This is an area that needs more work for sure...this was an example of just one approach that could be expanded in future.
     
    2) re  "Chill" approach-we certainly encourage a supportive, collaborative learning environment but our assessment processes are rigorous...we are still the only FM Program that requires sign off on all 23 EPAs to complete training.For this, residents have to be ready, and show they are ready, for independent practice...if they are not we provide remediation etc until they are.I should say also that our graduating residents confirm they feel the program adequately prepares them for practice consistently in our exit surveys.
     
    3) re Half day experiences; We do move our Residents around a lot to expose Resdients to a large number of longitudinal learning opportuntiies which does affect continuity in these but we focus our continuity efforts on our "Home" FM clinc experiences.....Residents are in their FM clinics for 2 days a week for 2 years(except when on immersion or elective rotations when they are on a half day per week).This is where continuity really happens and where its most important in terms of becoming a compeent Family Physician.
     
    Hope this helps.
  25. Like
    mononoke got a reaction from LeBronto2019 in What Is The Best Speciality To Go Into?   
    Why? The job market isn't great for this specialty
     
    I'd probably say in no particular order: 1. Family (flexibility, job market great, income based on how you structure your practice, short training) 2. physiatry (one of the hidden 'gems', lifestyle) 3. derm (jobs, good income) 4. anesthesia (covers many areas, intellectually challenging, colleagues easy to work with)
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