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MDwannabe02

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  1. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from Plastics96 in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Time Stamp: 8:38 am EDT
    Accepted/Waitlisted/Regrets: Accepted
    GPA: 3.79 + MSc(PT) = 3.99
    ECs: Grew up in ++rural and remote NWO community. New grad PT in neuro rehab; Campus EMS (4 years); coached hockey, soccer, and baseball for kids in my home community; substitute teacher and EA (in super rural NWO you don't have to be a teacher to get part-time substitute work); volunteered in local private physio clinic (1 year); undergrad research project (nothing published or particularly rigorous) and physio school research project (qualitative research - again nothing substantial or published); first aid instructor in my home community in NWO; and NWO placement and academic unit through NOSM while in physio school. Perhaps more, but those are the main ones I remember without referring to my application.
    Decision (will you accept your offer)? Already got on SAM on the OMSAS site and hit "firm accept"
    Campus: West
     
    Fifth application over a six year period since 2012. I won't go on about how happy I am to get in because I've been rejected post-interview 4 times, and I know how it stings to read those. Was #26 on the 2013 wait-list (when they still ranked us) and got flat out post-interview rejected every other year until now. If you really want to go to NOSM, do what you need to do to make it happen. For me, it was starting another health care career and finding a passion for rehabilitation and how medicine can help. If you want this to happen, find a way to make it so. Easier said than done, I know. But you can do it if you really want it!
  2. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to JohnGrisham in Virtual Patient   
    This exists already. There is a very comprehensive app called "Prognosis Your Diagnosis". It has ++ cases in many disciplines. 
  3. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to jlkhhylyiluh6 in Value in self-studying Pathoma, First Aid, Boards&Beyond in Preclerkship?   
    in canada? zero. I never opened those books and dont know anyone else that did, and did more than fine.
    For canada, Toronto Notes >>> everything else.
  4. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from Renoir in N.S. adds 15 new specialist residency seats to Dalhousie medical school   
    Anyone know if the emerg seats are CCFP or royal college programs?
  5. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to Bambi in Will I ever be ready   
    It is one step at a time. Just live your life, have as strong as possible academic record, follow your interests and contribute to your community. Be self-reflective, humble and kind. Have a Plan B. Persevere, do your best and let life unfold!
  6. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ZBL in How many residency positions are given due to nepotism?   
    Then you'd be incorrect, and you will see this once you actually start med school and eventually interact with MDs and med students from across Canada. You are no more likely to be a superstar doctor going to UofT vs Sask. Match rates don't reflect school prestige in Canada, unlike the US - in Canada there's far more regional bias. For example, most people going to NOSM have no intention of being a plastic surgeon - they want to be a rural family doctor, so consequently few will match to plastics by design. 

    I think you are unnecessarily differentiating what you know and who you know. Sometimes, you get to know the right people by knowing the right things. Do well on a surgical rotation, and I'll bet your staff will happily introduce you to the program director and just like that, suddenly you're "known" by the program. The situations you are describing where person X is relatively unaccomplished and matched to Y specialty just because their parents or neighbor is in specialty Y are extremely few. Yes, we do not put as much emphasis on your absolute score in med school like the US does, but at a certain point maybe it doesn't matter if you were 90th percentile or 80th percentile - you still know what you need to know to start residency, and probably other factors like how you fit with the program, what other skills you bring to the table besides reading and memorizing are important. Again, those just squeezing by at the bottom of the class likely will have deficiencies elsewhere and not be matching to things like plastics/derm/ENT anyways. 

    Bottom line: don't put so much faith in a single number from a single test. That's just bad statistics. 
  7. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from IMislove in OMA Membership vs CMA membership   
    Are you sure of those costs? I was under the impression that student memberships for CMA would be free starting in 2019. I believe it was in an email that came out around the same time as the announcement of the sale of MD Financial Management to Scotiabank. 
  8. Thanks
    MDwannabe02 reacted to Rorzo in Admitted but having second thoughts about med school   
    I won't be so flippant as to say just try it out, but I would ask you to try to take a step back and look at your situation objectively. At the end of the day, the only thing that matters is your happiness, and I do think there are many paths withing medicine that can be fulfilling for a wide variety of people; I also think it's incredibly easy to make numerous small sacrifices for dubious goals that accumulate to an overall frustrating life. 
    I've absolutely experienced that miserable feeling you're describing, few people get to experience being berated by someone at 4am because you're still on the low end of the totem pole in your mid twenties. And there are a ton of people in my med school class who pushed themselves to do research in med school on top of that, put time in to networking, over-studied for every test, only to continue the cycle for another 6 years of residency.
    You don't have to do that if that's not your picture of happiness though. I was initially pushing for a difficult specialty and I would feel anxious every second I wasn't working on my research project, I was attending rounds for that specialty and doing additional clinic on top of normal school duties, and I honestly felt terrible. Then I realized that this doesn't have to be my life, my peers from high school who I was jealous of treated their jobs like a job and there was no reason I had to let it consume my life. I studied to around the median, I played sports and video games instead of researching, and I got in to a fantastic community family medicine program. And now my average days are 9-4 with some charting on either end and the occasional home call. And while I found a niche I'm really excited to pursue full time, I know someone who recently graduated and makes 80k a year off one hard day of work per week - something you won't find in any other field and allows him to pursue his true passions.
    So that's where I'd ask you to be objective. Whatever career you're comparing medical school to, don't compare it to the jaded or overworked staff you never hope to be. Compare it to what you, with your values, would do with that degree. I can't guarantee it's for everyone, but if you've come this far there's a very strong chance you find something that works for you better on many levels than most alternatives.
  9. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from Mediocre2Med in Accepted/Rejected/Waitlisted??? (for current applicants)   
    Time Stamp: 8:38 am EDT
    Accepted/Waitlisted/Regrets: Accepted
    GPA: 3.79 + MSc(PT) = 3.99
    ECs: Grew up in ++rural and remote NWO community. New grad PT in neuro rehab; Campus EMS (4 years); coached hockey, soccer, and baseball for kids in my home community; substitute teacher and EA (in super rural NWO you don't have to be a teacher to get part-time substitute work); volunteered in local private physio clinic (1 year); undergrad research project (nothing published or particularly rigorous) and physio school research project (qualitative research - again nothing substantial or published); first aid instructor in my home community in NWO; and NWO placement and academic unit through NOSM while in physio school. Perhaps more, but those are the main ones I remember without referring to my application.
    Decision (will you accept your offer)? Already got on SAM on the OMSAS site and hit "firm accept"
    Campus: West
     
    Fifth application over a six year period since 2012. I won't go on about how happy I am to get in because I've been rejected post-interview 4 times, and I know how it stings to read those. Was #26 on the 2013 wait-list (when they still ranked us) and got flat out post-interview rejected every other year until now. If you really want to go to NOSM, do what you need to do to make it happen. For me, it was starting another health care career and finding a passion for rehabilitation and how medicine can help. If you want this to happen, find a way to make it so. Easier said than done, I know. But you can do it if you really want it!
  10. Haha
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ellorie in Interesting Program Directors Take on CARMS   
    Guess how many JVPs I've seen EVER?  Hint: 0
    I've definitely pretended to see some though  The key is to crouch, look thoughtful, and make vague hand gestures in the direction of the neck.  Bonus points if you fuss around with the bed elevation a little bit.
  11. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to The Bunny in FRCPC or CCFP-EM - the eternal EM discussion   
    I am a CCFP-EM working in a tertiary care hospital in BC doing full time emergency medicine. We teach medical students and residents including the occasional 5 year elective resident. I do not do any research but my center is looking to grow in that area and I totally could if I wanted. 
    As for who is hiring, I finished my EM year 2 years ago. 2 of my cohort are working in large academic centers not in BC. As far as I know, the only places in Canada that restricts to hiring 5 year EM residents are VGH and maybe st. Mike’s in Toronto. Everywhere else, I have heard of CCFP-EMs being hired in the last few years. It’s all about talking to the right person at the right time. 
  12. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from heydere in FRCPC or CCFP-EM - the eternal EM discussion   
    2 questions,
    1) Tried opening up the blog link at the beginning of this thread. Safari tells me the server no longer exists. Anyone know if this page is still floating around somewhere?
     
    2) I hear a lot of talk both in the real-world and PM101 forums about larger centres not hiring CCFP-EM docs in their EDs. Anyone know if there are any OFFICIAL resources on this? Or is it something passed on through word-of-mouth or even hospital specific policy?
    Thanks in advance for any answers
  13. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ralk in Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Medical Specialities   
    Ah yes, the good old Myers-Briggs personality types. Brings me back to first year undergrad...
    I've taken this test a number of times with some reasonably consistent results - my chosen career path is not listed among those detailed in my specific type (it's actually listed in the opposite of my type) and of those that are listed, only one held any interest for me in medical school.
    For those with an interest in personality research, check out the Big Five personality traits model. The Myers-Briggs model, while well-popularized, is a bit of an older model that hasn't stood up overly well to more rigorous testing, lacking a bit on both internal and external validity. The Big Five model shares some components with the Myers-Briggs, but has a bit of a better track record in academic circles (though still with its detractors) and, like the Myers-Briggs model, is widely studied and employed.
  14. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to MarshMellow in Does Your Medical School Matter   
    Easy with the Sask jibe 
     
    Class of 2015 - 84 students
     
    2 Students matched to plastic surgery (no plastics program in Sask)
     
    5 Students matched to ophthalmology (1 available spot in Sask)
     
    5 Students matched to orthopedic surgery (2 available spots in Sask)
     
    #Rekt
  15. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to Organomegaly in Show me the positive! What do you love about being a med student or a resident?   
    Things I love
    1) Accumulating a vast fund of knowledge -- Not many fields will offer the opportunity to learn so much practical material. From the basic sciences of pharmacology and physiology to their application to clinical medicine, one of my favourite parts of being a medical student is assimilating theory in a way that positively impacts patients. I love when theawareness of a mechanism of disease clearly guides the therapeutic options for a patient, and this in part specifically inspired me to pursue internal medicine. The "book to bedside" , quite simply, can be amazing. Reflecting back on the first day of medical school and now in my final days of clerkship, the amount of learning has been phenomenal.
    2) You experience what it is like to be human and suffer -- Throughout medical school, I have been exposed to tragedy. There is no other way to put it. I once saw a patient in clinic who appeared to be in stable condition. We recommended routine follow-up for her condition. Two days later she presented to the emergency department all vital signs absent. A catastrophic complication of her illness had occurred and we would have never predicted it. I have seen families grapple with taking their loved ones off life support. I have seen young patients clinging for dear life in the ICU. Patients respect you and look to you for guidance. In the process, you learn so much about what it is like to be human and vulnerable. Many find this aspect of medicine to be draining. It can be. I think the beauty of it is that you can be there with people on some of the most important journeys of their life.
    3) You experience the joy of a cure -- It is a well-kept secret from pre-meds that medicine offers little in the way of cure. We can stabilize and manage chronic illnesses, and do this daily. Yet, occasionally in medicine there comes an opportunity where can offer something more definitive. A C-section for a fetus with non-reassuring heart rate, and the joy of a mother's face when the baby is out of the womb and on the mother's chest. It is a surreal type of joy. When you use the right medication to help a couple who has been struggling to get pregnant have a baby. Selecting the correct medications to control the pain of an acute myocardial infarction and prevent catastrophic cardiac complications. When you pick the right anti-psychotic and the psychosis of a loved one dissipates. Even though these are simple treatment scenarios, the results are tangible and in a way that feels magical. I look back at them in the context of the patients I have met in my training and can't help but smile that the patient got so much better.
    4) You meet so many people -- Be it patients, families, colleagues, allied health or whomever it may be. Medicine is a highly social field. Some of my favourite experiences have been with other students and the great fun we've had outside of the classroom. I made at least a dozen new friends on the CaRMS tour for my discipline, and medicine will bring you to a lot of new places you have never been before be it on the elective tour, the interview tour or for your residency/job placements. It has been a hidden gem of medical school that I got to accumulate all of these new experiences.
  16. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from frenchpress in How happy are you with choosing medical achool and becoming a doctor? Êtes vous satisfaits d'avoir choisit la médecine comme carrière?   
    I think it would be difficult/nearly impossible to get the experience of somebody who left med school/medicine to share their experiences on a medium like PM101. I feel like most people on here are aspiring premeds, med students, residents, and the odd staff physician. 
     
    That being said, I encourage anyone unhappy in med school or medicine to look into the sunk cost fallacy. Freakonomics does a good podcast about it (the title of the episode is something about the benefits of quitting). Not to discourage people from pursuing medicine or grinding it out during training, but if you’re truly unhappy in medicine, it may be worth it to look elsewhere. It may be better for your mental health and current or future patients. 
  17. Like
  18. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from originalname1025 in How happy are you with choosing medical achool and becoming a doctor? Êtes vous satisfaits d'avoir choisit la médecine comme carrière?   
    I go to a medical school in Ontario, and my class’s mood is generally pretty good. The pass/fail grading system definitwly facilitates being more chill. 
  19. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from Hopplah in PT chances?   
    What do you mean by the statement “I currently volunteer as a PT”? Do you mean as a PTA (physio assistant)? Or are you using the abbreviation PT as something other than physiotherapist/physical therapist?
    Your application (according to what you’ve posted) would likely be competitive at U of T and Mac. Maybe Western, but I hear they started valuing physio experiences over the past few years as apposed to solely looking at the sGPA.  Queen’s is a bit of a mystery, but they also appear to heavily value structured physio experience. 
    Just be careful how you word your application. The terms “physiotherapist”, “physical therapist” and the abbreviation/title “PT” are protected in Ontario. So if you claim to be a “PT” (by accident or otherwise) on your application, not only are you breaking the law, but the schools would also not be very impressed (to say the least). 
  20. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ygella in What about Financial Advisors?   
    I have had two sessions with MD Financial (the CMA company) and they are a good group of people and I have been happy so far. Granted I have not sought the professional advice of any other company so I can't really draw a comparison, but it's a free service for CMA members which is great.
  21. Like
    MDwannabe02 got a reaction from PT2MD in PT chances?   
    What do you mean by the statement “I currently volunteer as a PT”? Do you mean as a PTA (physio assistant)? Or are you using the abbreviation PT as something other than physiotherapist/physical therapist?
    Your application (according to what you’ve posted) would likely be competitive at U of T and Mac. Maybe Western, but I hear they started valuing physio experiences over the past few years as apposed to solely looking at the sGPA.  Queen’s is a bit of a mystery, but they also appear to heavily value structured physio experience. 
    Just be careful how you word your application. The terms “physiotherapist”, “physical therapist” and the abbreviation/title “PT” are protected in Ontario. So if you claim to be a “PT” (by accident or otherwise) on your application, not only are you breaking the law, but the schools would also not be very impressed (to say the least). 
  22. Like
  23. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ralk in What are your thoughts on case-based learning?   
    It can be a great tool for reinforcing information, building on it, and applying it to real-world situations. Unfortunately, like any tool, it can be misused, and often is. Case-based learning requires an established baseline of knowledge among participants (which is often lacking) as well as access to resources (or preceptors) to help fill in any gaps in knowledge or to provide missing context (which is often lacking). Properly designed and utilized case-based learning can be very effective, but, like trying to put in a screw by using a hammer, it can't be used in all situations like many schools seems to want to do.
  24. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to ZBL in How is The Career in Sports Medicine?   
    Technically you can be sport medicine certified through the CASEM after any specialty - rheum, emerg, IM, plastics or whatever. You just need to meet their criteria for team coverage and pass the exam.
     
    But in comparing PMR to FM for sports, PMR only makes sense if you really want the neuro component. EMG is what pays in PMR, and aside from that there are no procedures that they do that a FM sports med can’t do or rheumatologist can’t do. Major injections are going to radiology regardless. Superficial ultrasound guided stuff is basic, and does not require a 5 year residency. Major repairs are going to ortho. And the typical overuse stuff is going to physio. Procedures in general aside from surgery for sports are very few and are likely to change over the next few years, even steroid injections have questionable evidence for a variety of conditions. As a consequence, the practice and income of sports med is basically no different between PMR and FM so it makes no sense to do a 5 year residency plus 1 year fellowship if all you want is MSK SEM. 
     
    Source: a PMR Doctor and PMR gunners. 
     
    Bottom line, if you want surgery and are ok with the looming prospect of poor job security (and possible shift away from surgery for sports), do ortho sports med. 
     
    If you want pure MSK non-op sports med, and do lots of referrals, and mix with general practice, do FM. 
     
    If if you like the above plus neurology and are ok with a somewhat unknown specialty, do PMR. 
     
    If if you like money and like bones and joints, but not touching them, do radiology.
     
    If you like bones and joints, and like to play with 30K per year drugs, do rheum.
     
    If if you actually want to supervise exercise, do physio and save yourself 200K and 8-11 years of med school/residency. 
     
    Or do plastics, make bank doing cosmetics and then tailor your FFS practice to athletes with hand injuries. 
  25. Like
    MDwannabe02 reacted to Monkey D. Luffy in I'm burning out   
    You're not the only one. I've felt like that many times, and I'm still in 2nd year. Sometimes I feel like I am not as smart as my classmates and that I can't keep up with everything. What I've found that helps is to find something that you love to do and that recharges your batteries and make time for it. Your wellness is as important, if not more, than all other things you have to juggle as a medical student. For me, that's cooking a nice meal for myself and my SO. For others it could be a sport, an instrument, reading, arts, or even just watching some Netflix.
    Another thing I want to mention, because it's really important, is to ensure that you are getting physical exercise! When I make the time to get in the gym a few times a week or go for a run, I feel infinitely better. I feel that I am more energized, and more focused mentally such that I can be efficient and get a lot more done, while feeling less burnt out.

    This journey we have embarked on is a long one, and it is vital to seek out and recognize the things that will make us want to wake up the next day to keep going at it.
     
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