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A-Stark

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A-Stark last won the day on November 15 2018

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  1. Elliott is fairly useless but Hoskins was an erstwhile physician who was the worst. Also anyone who has watched Doug Ford’s political career would know him to be a liar and an asshole. And incompetent. Aside from his longstanding enabling of his late brother’s substance abuse, he managed to lie about things like his wife’s being Jewish during his mayoral campaign. Making any assumption that under him the PCs would be better than any of the alternatives was demonstrably false. Not because I liked the alternatives, but because it was clear that the establishment types like Elliott and Mulroney would be utterly spineless. And they have been. The only things Doug is good at are cronyism and policy chaos.
  2. There's a good book floating around called Anesthesia for Medical Students put out by the Ottawa group. You can find it online as an e-book and older copies might be floating around. Be keen, don't be afraid to try stuff, and show up not only on time but early. Introduce yourself to nurses in patient holding. Usually you'll be assigned to work with a particular staff in advance. How things go will often be personality dependent, but you'll find the groove quickly enough.
  3. Not that many people are going to get a finance job straight out of undergrad. Again, not all that typical. And very competitive. Most law students aren't jumping right into "big law" and the vast majority of lawyers are not with big firms making high six figures. What kind of consultants? I don't think doing medicine "for the money" makes a whole lot of sense, but I really don't think it's realistic to suggest that many many under-40 people in the job market are making way more. It does provide for a very comfortable amount of income, especially if you're not overly profligate with your money. The residency-to-staff transition is nothing short of astounding financially, e.g. I can sit down and read a few hundred EKGs over a few hours and bill $4k. Generally speaking it's much busier in wholly different ways, but the "average doctor" does pretty well, especially compared to most people. We tend to compare ourselves to our peers first and foremost, but we do well regardless. And while being motivated by money isn't really enough on its own, it is MUCH easier to enjoy what you're doing when you are well paid for it. So, for example, when yesterday the ERP called me with no less than four consults in emerg in the middle of the afternoon, I can't say my thoughts about it at all resembled how I would have felt as a resident. Also, weekend dialysis.
  4. I'm not sure why social events involving drinking are considered markers of wealth. I would say at my med school not drinking was very much an exception. Generally speaking, EtOH is the centre of socialization in the Maritimes and NL.
  5. Having actually billed for dialysis, I can't really argue with this. I have a hard time understanding why a chronic run based on dry weight is compensated the same as, say, a stress test or more than double a routine inpatient visit. Sure, dialysis patients can run into trouble, but so do inpatients. Either way, there are a lot of inequities that aren't justified by much of anything at all (especially when they give rise to the cartel-like behaviour of a lot of nephro groups).
  6. Adult rheumatologists don't see much of any "degenerative" stuff because they're too busy with all the RA, PSA, etc.
  7. I'm only a few months in but I do find staff life more stressful. The exam year was a different kind of crazy but I find outpatient practice dizzying. My setup is pretty nice and our EMR is good, but it tends to pull me in many different directions at once. The ICU weeks are busy and often long but my days are much more circumscribed. Call is busy but I don't find it stressful exactly. Tiring, for sure, but that's not quite the same. I also live within walking distance to the hospital so it's enough getting around. (It's really been far more stressful going through kitchen renos...) I never got the "leaving early" thing. Why would they ever get to do that? There'd certainly be time for an extra case or so if that policy didn't exist. Otherwise they never had any sense to NOT trash talk each other while other people are sitting in, say, patient holding. (Other people as in me.)
  8. It's not really the same as looking at renal cysts or the liver's "echotexture".
  9. It depends on the hospital. You won't say many if any GIMs who have anything like Level III echo training but Level II (e.g. about 6 months and mainly TTE) is feasible. We have radiologists reading echos currently... GIMs scoping is a thing in smaller hospitals - mine has actual GI specialists and surgeons who compete for scope time. I don't get any of the urban "academic" GIM consults with the non-specific aches and pains and feelings of ennui (and many iterations of ANA/ENA investigations). And I have yet to get an outpatient diabetes consult. I don't expect I'll really have time for any of that. There's just so much chest pain...
  10. I"m not sure what kind of suburban 905 voters will be happy with any of this.
  11. There are a few GIMs pushing up to 7 figures, but they're the ones scoping and/or reading echos in smaller community centres. Most of my referrals are cardiology. I had a fairly light clinic day today preceded by stress tests and MIBIs with or without said treadmill all week. And I'm really still just starting so referrals are only just starting to pick up.
  12. It exists but a "high volume" subspecialty it is not.
  13. I would not necessarily be against some sort of required "service" period but it presupposes changes to the postgraduate training system. If we had a common "internship" like system with 1-2 years of broad training, to be followed with a period of service in a GP/urgent care/community emerg setting that might make sense. Not all that likely, though...
  14. Tendencies for fluctuating workplace relationships too?
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