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SunAndMoon

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  1. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to la marzocco in Master degree before medical school   
    A masters may not be helpful at this point, a second undergrad is the way to go.
  2. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from kween in Why Western?   
    Beeeeecause admissions are competitive and you apply broadly and take what you can get? What kinda question is that? 
     
    Zeja, look up their website and look through the forum, you can easily come up with stuff.
  3. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to beeboop in Written Component Performance   
    if you can write in english you literally have nothing to worry about
  4. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from Cidez in LE IB AU SECONDAIRE   
    si t'ameliores pas tes notes tu risques de finir sans-abri 
  5. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to rmorelan in Salaries of specialists adjusted for overhead expenses   
    The sooner you know how it works the better - ha, that is a major reason the forum exists and why the "old timers" around here are trying to keep the information flowing. Try to level the playing field. 
  6. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from PharmaLife in GPA Question   
    B for sure
  7. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to LostLamb in Pediatric neurology   
    It was a field I seriously considered and interviewed for a couple years ago; ultimately, I decided that my personal and professional goals would be better met through another specialty.
    My understanding is that academic positions are harder to come by, but that if you wished to open a private practise you could be okay. I think the pay is less than that for other peds specialties, probably more on par with community pediatricians. Many practitioners are combo academics/clinicians, hence the focus of being in a university.
    It is an extremely small and tight knit community across the country--you cross the country and mention who you've done an elective with and everyone seems to know everyone on a first name basis from having trained, trained with, or trained under the other person.
    Big areas you'd deal with are epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and stroke, and of course all the neurodevelopmental disorders/syndromes. You often share patients with many other specialties (resp, genetics/metabolics, cardio, neonatology, psych).  Procedures are basically same as adult neuro, but more so LPs and reading EEGs, not so much EMG. You do become good at breaking bad news as a number of outcomes you come across are grim.
    It is an academically interesting specialty, challenging as each patient is quite unique, but if you're a "fixer" and prefer certainty, it is probably not the specialty for you. There is lots of ambiguity and often apart from diagnosing and then managing chronic conditions you end up following kids until they turn 18 without having a ton to offer except moral support (not a bad thing, in my opinion--it means so much to the patient and their families and caregivers).
  8. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  9. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  10. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  11. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to la marzocco in OOP waitlist movement   
    Hey! First of all, congrats! Being on the OOP waitlist in and of itself is a great accomplishment already! The OOP waitlist normally moves when Ontario releases their results in mid-May. I believe the Western schools (UBC, Cal, etc.) are also early- to mid-May. This is when you will see plenty of movements as most will want to attend a school closer to where they reside. There will be another bump in mid-June when the $500 deposit becomes non-refundable. Those two are the key times when one should see more movements.
    In terms of movements, I can give you some statistics: 
    The OOP success rate ranges from 1.8% to 3.5%, based on the past 5 years of data. The average being 2.72%. Success rate is defined as those received at least one offer of admission whether subsequently registered, declined or deferred. There were 918 OOP applicants this year, so one can expect 16-32 total offers being made; average being 25 total offers. Since 10 offers have been made, the waitlist should move around 6-22 positions; average being 15.
    tl;dr using the past 5 years as a proxy for what will happen this year, the waitlist should move to about spot 15. But please take this with a tremendous amount of salt as things have changed - there were +20% OOP applicants this year.
  12. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from CanPreMed2018 in Thoughts on "Think medical school is for you? You're probably wrong"   
    Condescending and pretentious
  13. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  14. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  15. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  16. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from SMT in Post-Refusal   
    As someone who has had to apply multiple times to get in, I understand and feel the pain that all of you are feeling. There are tons of people at McGill who have gotten in on their 2nd, 3rd, 4th, or even 5th shots with similar number of interviews. Do not give up. 
    The ranks will give you a clearer picture about how your performance was evaluated. There is subjectivity in that, but it will provide clues as to what you need to do.
    I cannot stress enough the importance of your pre-req GPA. Retake courses if you need to, aim for the highest GPA possible. MMI scores can be relatively homogenous, if they aim for a bell curve that means that a large percentage of those admitted got in by very little, and by the same logic many of you were rejected by very little. The pre-req GPA is the easiest thing to control.
    As to the MMI, sit down and think carefully about what happened, about how you came across, about what you would like to have done better, but also what you did well. Before you do that, wait for the emotions to sink in and try to look at things coldly and analytically. Some stations lend themselves particularly well to this type of analysis, others are more subject to interpretation.
    Other than that, the process unfortunately involves luck. It's possible that with the same performance, you would've made it last year, or you'll make it next year. Keep that in mind and don't blame too much, but you have no choice to trust the process. 
    I've followed the posts a little bit, and I look forward to see a lot of you join the faculty in the upcoming years.
  17. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to Angry+Bitter+Unmatched in 2018 CaRMS Second Iteration Interview Thread   
    Just the simple math of the issue merits that someone (CaRMS) ask some serious questions.  If we are going to the trouble and expense to provide documentation, obtain letters of reference, and write a 1000 word essay I think it is implied when you PAY to apply that someone will actually read your entire application.  This is bullshit.  However, since I'm clearly not going to match....again...I've got a year to raise a stink.  I'm filing a grievance with CaRMS today.  Those of you that applied to Calgary Vascular and Ottawa Derm should do the same, as those cases are even more egregious, when I mentioned those two examples to someone at the CaRMS helpdesk this morning they basically said if they are listed in the second round they are not allowed to "save the spot".  
  18. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to heydere in 2018 CaRMS Second Iteration Interview Thread   
    To clarify, this is not true. The ROS in Ontario is anywhere the resident chooses and the need exists, except for Toronto and Ottawa. 
  19. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to goleafsgochris in 2018 CaRMS Second Iteration Interview Thread   
    I think this is also not seeing the whole picture.  1811 applying for 338 spots--but have you ever done an IMG file review?  (I don't know what stage you are at).  I helped with one in residency.  It is a fucking train wreck.  Many of those 1811 have applied for many years in a row.  While its hard to find a red flag on CMG apps, you can literally throw out immediately over half the IMG apps.  Terrible English.  Basic lack of understanding of what the specialty does.  I threw out a few neurology apps because they literally handed in Psychiatry apps without changing the word Psychiatry to Neurology in their personal statement.
    Anyway, mediocrity IS often an option.  Generally the IMGs we ranked would be ranked below every CMG we ranked.  I haven't even discussed how comparatively poorly they perform in interviews. Unless you have experience with the actual applications you have no idea.  Trust me, its not like those 1811 are all CSAs who just missed the med school cutoffs.
  20. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to rmorelan in 2018 CaRMS Second Iteration Interview Thread   
    ha - exactly how many medical students are  really "taxpayers" as the term is intended? I really hate that term (it somehow implies the amount of tax you pay equals your worth - and since tax is basically on everything one way or the other, even if it is just sales tax,  it is a bit meaningless if applied overall or not so subtly insulting in other ways.)
    Medical students' parents might be tax payers. Statistically speaking pay more than most as they have on average higher incomes. But medical students? With our huge tuition benefits, highly subsidized medical education (and prior education), numerous bursaries/grants....... not so much
    So why would a Canadian taxpayer have any obligation towards a medical student on a tax basis? Those students aren't taxpayers - not yet and either an IMG or them will be equal taxpayers in the long run. If the Canadian taxpayer has obligations towards Canadian citizens - which I think is a much better argument - then the issue is IMGs one way or there are either citizens or will be soon enough re immigration and the argument doesn't quite work that way either. 
    In the traditional political sense a "taxpayer"  should be happy about IMGs - that is great value for the taxpayer as someone else has paid at least a major part of the  roughly 25 years of education it takes to be a doctor. Each one saves roughly 300K in direct education costs. 
  21. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to PetiteAgour in 2018 CaRMS Second Iteration Interview Thread   
    You do know IMG carms applicants are tax paying permanent residents or Canadian citizens right? Again it is not cheating the system. The path securing a residency with CARMS as an IMG is a difficult one and I would not recommend anyone going to study abroad unless they had a really good reason. I hear too many CSA and IMG horror stories where they end up with a useless of piece of paper at the end of the day!

    I also don't think a unified first iteration is fair. Why should we victimize taxpaying IMGs for poor policy decisions in a system is already very discriminatory and tough for them. Despite how imperfect the system is, there are success stories with IMGs. I dont think victimizing IMGs who have to be Canadian to apply is the right way to go. We should push for additional funding and support +/- cut spots for medical school admission when we can't support them. We should also ask why these students didnt match in the first place? I be very troubled if we were obligated to match every CMG regardless of whether they like their profession or red flags. 
  22. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to A-Stark in Salaries of specialists adjusted for overhead expenses   
    Internists aren't usually working hospital-based salaried jobs. They might have an office connected to the hospital, but there is often associated rent or overhead expenses. Same goes for secretaries, and leaving that to a hospital or RHA means you have no control over who gets hired. 
    I suppose the academic environment can be good, but the politics can be *highly* toxic. But nurses aren't calling staff in the middle of the night for the kinds of nonsense they dump on R1s. I almost always sleep through the night on staff locums. Emerg holds consults for you until the morning too. 
    It all depends on how you spend and save. One staff was telling me the other day all the details of how he's organized his finances. He lives quite comfortably but isn't at all interested in extravagances. And he's put away close $2m in about 7 years despite having a salaried job at the lower end of scale. 
    I suppose it all comes down to what you enjoy. I like working with people and acuity and doing some variably invasive procedures. I guess being a banker or sitting around at a computer all day can pay the bills pretty well but it's boring. Money is important but after a certain point we're pretty lucky when we actually like (or even sometimes love!) what we do. I guess for some people that means wearing a suit everyday and working in an office. Sounds like hell to me!
  23. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to humhum in Salaries of specialists adjusted for overhead expenses   
    Yes. I had two different long-term careers in two different industrial sectors, and have seen the careers trajectories of dozens of colleagues in wide-ranging fields as law, engineering, consulting, technology start ups, etc, with employments in multiple provinces, and internationally, including silicon valley . So yes, I have, and my conclusions are based on all of this.
  24. Like
    SunAndMoon reacted to humhum in Salaries of specialists adjusted for overhead expenses   
    It always confuses me the outward glamour that medical students think people in Silicon Valley have. I worked in the Silicon Valley industry specifically for many years, and let me tell you, it is shit work compared to day in the clinic. You may think 150K/year is good income, except either you are worked to death doing the most meaningless repetitive tasks like debugging the latest issue of a crappy app that will be obsolete in 6 months, or you are constantly living with the threat of getting laid off in the umber-competetive industry that is basically defined by "disruption" and permanent state of flux and transience , or you are paying most of your income for housing and still commuting a good chunk of your waking hours. You probably will see your engineer friend get hired out of school by Tesla (oooooh), and think that now he is an object of envy. Let me tell, I will not trade a PGY1 year for being an engineer at any company in Silicon Valley. The competitiveness in the workplace is brutal, and your employers are not constrained by any ethical values when it comes to doing WHATEVER it takes to polish their quarterly earnings. You do that for 15 years, you will still be at best a middle class earner, and look back at your professional life being basically defined as nothing but having been a gadget-maker.
    And you have to remember, you are now comparing a completely different market to your employment opportunities in Canada. The earnings of the tech sector in Canada compared to states is a fraction of the numbers you are quoting above. We can start talking about how much orthopaedic surgeons, bariatric surgeons, cosmetic surgeons, etc. make in the states, and Silicon Valley engineers have nothing over these money-making factories in the private medical world..
    The real high-earners in the tech world are the successful start ups, or the top-tier executives. In the former, you might be impressed by the survival-bias stories, but the reality is that vast vast vast majority of start ups fail miserably, with huge losses. In the latter, you can set your sights on becoming CEO, but to get there as a bottom-feeding engineer, you have to pass through the Valley of Death. That is the valley of first having to become a middle-manager. Do you know who is the first to get laid off in any "restructuring"? Hordes upon hordes of middle managers. Again, following the careers of my colleagues now that we are nearly 14 years out of comp sci degrees, for many, their life has basically one lay off after another. They are not living on the streets by any stretch, but far from the rosy picture you might extrapolate from the earnings of starting engineers in one isolated area in California.
  25. Like
    SunAndMoon got a reaction from lmck in non-traditional   
    That is true, but the question was not "Do people get in without labs?" It was "Do you need labs?" 
    As per the admissions website the answer to that question could not be clearer. I know someone who got in with the Bac 120 courses too, but when it came time for me to redo my prereqs Admissions were clear that I was not to take those and that they would not be admissible. 
    I wouldn't risk it at all if I were an applicant.
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