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jr2

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About jr2

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  1. Hey Schulich2019, That's absolutely not what I intended to say....maybe it came across that way, but I just wanted to give the general advice of keeping your mind open to a diversity of people and not to be overly picky (not b/c you can't be, but you never know when the right person may be staring you in the face, but you're overlooking them b/c you have a different concept of what your "ideal" partner should be). Also, if you're looking for a serious relationship, it's important that youactually jive with the other person personality-wise. Obviously, mutual physical attraction is critical, but there are other factors to consider too. Sorry if I offended you or said something that came off as derogative. That wasn't my intent.
  2. Going to the gym can make a world of a difference for your self-confidence in the dating market (if ur not doing so already). Plus, our generation is extremely shallow when it comes to choosing partners, esp. when it comes to dating apps or meeting people at parties/bars. Like others have already mentioned, always be respectful and don't look for love in the wrong places. While hooking up at a party or using Tinder may work fine for someone who's been getting laid since high school, I recommend you try and find someone through mutual friends, activities, or study groups first. That might be a better place to start. Also, don't be too shallow or looks-oriented....the nerdy, cute, quiet girl in your lecture is prob more compatible for you than some random hot person twerking on tables at a London bar. I know this sounds a bit more shallow/callous than what was shared above, but I wanted to be totally real with you. As a side note, I was also a late bloomer, but in my case it was b/c of life circumstances beyond my control. Things are better now, but I know how it feels. Don't be too hard on yourself and don't let anyone intimidate or belittle you for being sexually inexperienced. You sound like a wonderful guy and I wish you the best.
  3. QE1 is changing so that 3rd years will be eligible to take the test. Do you think it is ok to try and write at the end of core clerkship rotations in 3rd year to get it out of the way and have more time off before res, or is it something that should be taken at the end of 4th year (b/c of more experience/clinical exposure)?
  4. Are you set on practicing in Canada? There is significant international recruitment for duke nus in Singapore. They are required to do a full time year of research as part of their program, but there is a return of service agreement and I believe you must do residency in Singapore. I don't believe the residency training is accepted here but I'm not sure. If you don't mind learning and living in Singapore PERMANENTLY, I think it's a great option. They also have loads of admissions scholarships. I was tempted to apply last year...
  5. There are so many people in med school just like you (I'm one of them). While I've made friends with some of my classmates, I can't say that I relate to most of them, frankly. I guess it's just a function of different life experiences, how you were raised, values, interests, etc. But don't feel the need to be buddy buddy with all the people in your class. Be polite, be cordial, but dont be desperate. Don't be afraid to join activities (that you feel comfortable doing) or to ask people to hang out or study together. If they don't want to join you, it's their loss and they can go eat fudge. If you don't like hard partying, find other people (even outside your program...actually it's refreshing being around non-med students). Just know you're not alone, and that not everyone in med school likes to "play hard"....there are a lot of people who play soft and prefer it that way. There's also lots of kids who aren't rich, well traveled and who don't look like models (though it's sometimes hard to believe lol). Occasional solitude can be a great thing too....spend some time in nature, find some hobbies, explore your new city on your own terms and not just to drink and sleep around. Try to call your family every now and then and keep in touch with your undergrad friends over FB. Summer is around the corner, too. By clerkship, none of this will matter and everyone will be doing 26 hours at the hospital anyways. In any case, take care friend. I send you electronic hugs!
  6. I recommend free, online, non-marked courses like EdX and Coursera (the EdX Biochemistry is really good). You can complete these at your own pace over the summer. Topics most relevant to the MCAT include Intro bio, Biochemistry, Genetics and Intro Chemistry. While you can get away without touching any biology before med school (i.e. if you go to Mac), I recommend you learn a bit on your own time before applying/taking the MCAT. I mean....wouldn't you want to spend a couple months practicing with Rosetta Stone before travelling to France? Ultimately, it's a personal choice and there are many people who excel in clinical medicine without a rigorous education in the basic sciences. Good luck! P.S. Your philosophy background will be incredibly helpful on the Critical Reading section of the MCAT and will be very helpful in fleshing out tricky ethical scenarios in clinic.
  7. The mcat cutoff in cars is quite high for non swomen at 95th percentile. A lot of people apply with a 128 or 127 hoping the cutoff will drop (to no avail).
  8. Hi, Work hard for a 4.0 in 4th year. You will likely qualify for queens and western wgpa (last two and best two years). Uottawa is also an option if you do well in a full time 4th year befire graduating. Uoft wgpa will not apply due to your first year (less than 10 courses). Your MCAT is ok, but is a bit low for queens and western if non swomen. I recommend you resit to improve your odds at those two schools. If you can improve cars to 128 it opens Alberta schools that are ec heavy and drop your worst year from gpa. Your ecs sound impressive. Good job on the whole and good luck moving forward!
  9. Everyone else already commented on the issue at hand, but I just wanted to say that's a very inspiring story. You sound like an amazing human being. Best of luck with MD apps!
  10. I really don't think you need awards to get in....they care more about your actual life accomplishments through ECs, volunteer work, etc. If you won an NSERC USRA, that counts as an award and looks good. So do admissions scholarships to undergrad. Dean's List is another one you can put on there.
  11. I would recommend volunteer work with a marginalized group of some kind. There is an entire 5-entry section for this type of activity on the ubc app separate from community service. If you're passionate about research you should emphasize that in your app as well. Though it may sound sexier to say you're a varsity athlete or something like that, research is the future of medicine and it's a valuable part of your journey. Do things you like. You've spent 1000 hours working in research, so I thought you would like a masters/doing full time research. It helps if you get pubs or abstracts out and some schools award a very minor bonus for graduate students. I don't think ubc does. If you'e only doing a MSc for med school, then think twice about it. Grad school is tough and if you don't like it you'll be miserable. If you don't do a masters, maybe look into a 5th year to boost your gpa even more (if you can afford it).
  12. Make sure you aim for 90+ in 4th year. If that means not taking on too much outside of school, so be it. What's your score breakdown for MCAT? Scoring a really high MCAT opens doors in Canada....if you can get that CARS above 129 and score well on bio, you can get a Western interview (as long as you were doing full time years in school according to their rules). UBC uses percentage not GPA/4.0 to score your application. Your percent GPA may be more competitive if it's only 1 or 2 courses dragging it down. If your % GPA is mid to high 80s, you should be competitive for IP I think. UBC is also hyper-EC's heavy, so consider volunteering with a vulnerable sector of the population to improve your CV (this is also a good life experience in and of itself). Choose a cause that matters to you. If med doesn't work out next year and you get a 3.9+ in your fourth year, I personally would just go into a Masters. Your interests seem very research-focused. Most schools in this country use a wGPA calc, so your second year really won't matter except at Mac and Ottawa.
  13. Other people can comment on your ECs and what to do. Your 4.0 GPA and Swomen status are worth their weight in gold at Western. Your GPA is also great for Mac. Framing this situation in terms of the end goal (which is admission at a med school), I would focus on scoring a 128 + CARS for Mac, and a well-rounded MCAT to meet the UWO cutoffs (note that the sectional and overall cuttoffs for Swomen at UWO are quite low...with your GPA I would be surprised if you don't meet them). I would write the MCAT this summer so you can apply next year. If I was you, I would focus on the MCAT this summer....4 months of ECs isn't going to change your overall CV, but a good MCAT with your GPA will have you with 2 interviews next February. You should try and study 4-6 hours every day. That's my 2 cents anyways. I'm sure you'll get a diversity of opinions on here.
  14. FYI, from Western's admissions page: I am still in school but only have one year which meets the minimum GPA. Am I still eligible to apply? If you have one undergraduate year which meets the minimum GPA and are currently enrolled in full-time studies, you are eligible to apply. If you were to receive an offer of admission, it would be conditional on meeting the minimum GPA in your current year of study (with 5 full course equivalents at the requisite levels).
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