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Britster

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  1. I also have one there on Monday. Flight is supposed to be tomorrow evening (I thought I was being smart flying out there early). Going to just be hoping for the best at this point ...
  2. For McMaster psychiatry applicants - what time does the interview day end (minus the social event)? I got off the waitlist so I was only given the date, no agenda. No one's in office until Jan and I'm trying to figure out logistics of flights as I have an interview elsewhere the next day. Thanks!
  3. For those that recieved and accepted their invite to Manitoba psych, have you received any email back with confirmation of your exact interview time yet?
  4. I applied broadly to psych this year, with a heavily psych geared application. I've only received 2 invites (luckily one from my 1st choice), 1 waitlist, and 4 rejections so far. It's pretty discouraging, especially as you mentioned based on stats most people match/get invites in the past. Perhaps psychiatry is just really competitive this year. However, as JohnGrisham above pointed out, you only need one yes to match. So hang in there!
  5. Anatomical Pathology: Anesthesiology: Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatoon (28 Nov), UBC (29 Nov) Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: Sherbrooke (21 Nov), Laval (21 Nov), Montreal (21 Nov), Ontario IMG (30 Nov) General Pathology: General Surgery: Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Sherbrooke (Nov 26) Medical Genetics and Genomics: Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Manitoba (28 Nov) Neurology - Paediatric: Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Ophthalmology: Orthopaedic Surgery: Otolaryngology: Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: PM&R: Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 22), McMaster (Dec 3), McGill (Dec 3), Manitoba (Dec 3) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Radiation Oncology: Alberta (Dec 2) Urology: Western (Dec 2) Vascular Surgery:
  6. Anatomical Pathology: Anesthesiology: Cardiac Surgery: Dermatology: Diagnostic Radiology: Emergency Medicine: Family Medicine: General Pathology: General Surgery: Hematological Pathology: Internal Medicine: Medical Genetics and Genomics: Medical Microbiology: Neurology: Neurology - Paediatric: Neuropathology: Neurosurgery: Nuclear Medicine: Obstetrics and Gynaecology: Ophthalmology: Orthopaedic Surgery: Otolaryngology: Pediatrics: Plastic Surgery: PM&R: Psychiatry: Memorial (Nov 22) Public Health and Preventive Medicine: Radiation Oncology: Urology: Vascular Surgery:
  7. You can declare after you receive an offer (but double check with your specific university for the due date of declaration - I believe U of M is July/Mid-August).
  8. I found during first year of pre-clerkship I was fine taking the bus (and my commute was about 30-45 minutes). Occasionally we were required to be off-site but even then I would either bus or carpool with classmates. I can't speak for second year, but I feel it would be similar, although there is more off-site teaching.
  9. The rural attributes include living, working, high school, and volunteering I believe. There are multiple questions you fill out, and the more you fill the more rural you'd be considered. So yes, the little bit of volunteering would add a bit to your rural coefficient, as well as if you only temporarily lived in a rural area. It's not an all or nothing attribute, so any little bit of exposure to a rural area could be to your benefit.
  10. I went with RBC because I found them easier to work with, but that's really just personal preference. RBC now offers P-0.25% so it doesn't really matter where you go I think. You can meet with a few different places and see who offers you the best deal and/or who you mesh better with.
  11. Hi all! Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg is hiring a research assistant for the multiple sclerosis clinic. This is a great opportunity for premeds to get expose to working in a hospital and close interaction with patients on a daily basis. It's an excellent stepping stone for anyone interested in medical school or any other health-related careers, and allows lots of opportunities for additional research with the multiple sclerosis research team. The posting can be found here: https://www.brainhunter.com/frontoffice/seekerViewJobDetailAction.do?sitecode=pl545&jobId=2242619&page=search&external=#searchSection I worked this position for the past 2 years and found it to be a valuable experience and I highly recommend it. If anyone has any questions about what this job is like please send me a PM or comment below, I'd be happy to share.
  12. Personally the reason I didn't extend my MCAT studying over a long period of time was that I knew that I would be bored out of my mind of the content. Sure I'd probably know it extremely well by the end, but I'd also get into the exam just glad it would be over with and really not caring. I wrote it three times (the final time due to the new MCAT coming out and doing a last "hail Mary" type thing as I did not want to write the new one), and truthfully the major difference was really just how I studied, not even how much. The first time I wrote it I took a prep course and studied full time from May until my exam date end of August. I was soooo naive in my studying methods though so I only scored a 28. Second time I studied from January to July, which grant you is more time, but I was also working full time by this point so the hours were much lower in total. But I was much more effective in my studying now that I had really experience what the exam was like. After I wrote I took a bit of a break, waited for my score, and then started studying again for my January exam. And as I semi-expected, by the time I got there I was so bored. A full year of studying in what felt like all my spare time I wanted to just be done with it. I also ended up getting the exact same score as my last exam. So if I were to go back in time to give advice to my past self, I would just recommend the "cram style" but with effective methods (not studying like I'm writing a regular test). But really, it's to each their own. Some people have the endurance to last a whole year looking at the same content over and over. I just didn't.
  13. I'm going to chime about your fourth question, as I can very much relate to it. The first time I interviewed I was in the lowest quintile. My stats were similar to yours in regard to MCAT and AGPA. So I spent the next year bettering my apparently non-existent interview skills. The first thing I did was join Toastmasters. This was a HUGE help, as it gets you comfortable with speaking to people you don't know well. It also helps with dealing with body language, speech styles, and structuring your speech (there a fun little impromptu section of the meetings that were super beneficial). Once I received my interview invite I starting practising with groups of people, mostly that I had just coordinated with through this forum. But as other people mentioned already, you can practice by yourself by recording and then reviewing it. Another thing I did was started journalling experiences that I have had that related to the CANMED roles. I also started finding the specific types of questions MMI will ask (e.g., dealing with stress, authority figures, a time there was a miscommunication etc.) and thinking of *specific* experiences in my life I could potentially talk about. I think this is actually what saved me the most this year, as I could more readily bring forth experiences that related to the questions.
  14. Accepted/Waitlisted/Regrets: Accepted! In Province (IP)/ Out of Province(OOP): IP GPA(x.xx/4.5): 4.12/4.5 MCAT (xx.xx/15): 10.38 Rural/Non-Rural: City slicker, but checked a few of the SES questions Advanced Academics (PhD, pubs, academic appointment): n/a Accepting Offer/Declining Offer: Already accepted! Third time applying, second interview. Super excited! Definitely with pinkcountry on persevering even if you get rejected. If medicine is what you want never give up!
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