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WomboCombo

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  1. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to uwo2008PG in Pandemic/Post-Pandemic Dentistry   
    Absolutely correct. I don't mean for this to be a dig at Ostracized, because in early April, we didn't have all the the retrospective data we have now, and also things seemed quite dim with new cases surpassing 500+ daily. We just didn't know. I just would caution how we react in times of uncertainty. Several media outlets really tried to sensationalize this with regards to dentists. Hygienists have been the most willing to jump on board to paint this profession as a "ticking time bomb", "death trap", and "the most dangerous job". These are direct statements they made in articles. Also, these articles were printed in June when we were allowed to resume work! I can understand pessimism back in April, heck, I had some concerns myself. However, by June, we should know better. Ultimately, the only case I know of a dentist with COVID in Canada was contracted at a major dental conference where.... they did not wear any PPE at the conference. We have nearly 2 months of procedures province wide in Ontario with our universal standard precautions with several manageable COVID specific measures, and there has not been, to my knowledge, a case traced back to any dental office. I have faith in the work my staff puts in daily to keep our patients, staff, and community safe. So regards to someone saying earlier about telling it to the public. I do! I also recommend you do too. Or at the very least we should not do harm by spreading misinformation. 
    Fear-mongering and sensationalism ultimately prevents people from getting needed treatment, postponing restos then becoming endos, and also preventing us from using the skills we have trained nearly a decade for. I also have to say we *are* in health care. There are occupational hazards inherent in what we do. We don't need dentist appreciation days or posts, nor will we get them. But don your PPE and help your community. That includes not scaring them from getting required care without scientific basis. I do sympathize with a precautionary approach, but even prior to COVID, it was often stipulated that precautions need to be reasonable. The highest degree of precaution with be a negative COVID test verified and administered by the state to allow you to leave the house for that one day (ideally one trip to a single location on the most direct route - almost like with your RPAL). That is a great precaution, and no one can criticize you for not being safe, however, it is not reasonable nor practical.
    Regarding our practice, we fortunately had a good stock of all PPE, including some N95s. I had one staff member come in daily to take phone calls and check messages, and I was on call with an assistant to come into the office to help to the best of my ability. We still tried our best to limit aerosol generating procedures. We saw 2-3 patients about 3-4 days a week for the months of March, April, and May. In June, with the revised guidelines, we opened up all the dental, and we brought back our hygienists relatively recently. Production is down with no polishes from hygienists (they suggested this due to discrepancies between the regulatory bodies), and my appointments tacking on another 10-15 minutes each. Tends to affect quick small fillings more than long endos. Overall though, we are doing well, and I haven't crunched the numbers since May, but I estimate to be back to 90% of pre COVID levels in the next few months. I do not know when COVID will leave us, but eventually once we start to add prophies again, and either get more acclimated to the new guidelines, or go back to the old guidelines, I have confidence the practice will meet and then surpass our prior financial metrics.
    I will also say that production alone isn't a good measure of the financial health. The increased PPE costs have increased overhead. However, that is a whole other discussion, but there are ways to mitigate that. The CEWS is very helpful, and helps make up the difference in increased PPE and decreased production. We certainly qualified with a 30% loss of production without any hygiene, and the government has changed the program that even with a 10% loss in production you qualify. The CEWS has also been extended into the Winter. Payroll will likely be your biggest expense so the CEWS really helps close the gap.
  2. Haha
    WomboCombo reacted to longteethgriffy in Dental schools and Covid   
    please bro I never thought I would beg to go back to school but make it happen lol
  3. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from HopefulDDS in Dental schools and Covid   
    Grad clinics return in July. 50 percent occupancy for undergrad clinics in August probably for the rest of the school year with four handed dentistry at all times so aerosol production is minimized. They had debated allowing undergrads return in July but said we could take it off so we can return in August.
    Without needing N95s, the school is no longer short on PPE as regular surgical masks will be provided per usual. Students will begin with treatment that is already in progress in August (inserts, try ins, emergencies, urgent tx) with minimal aerosol production, followed by the ability in September to start new treatment. 
  4. Thanks
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Starburst in NBDE Part I   
    I studied for 3 weeks and found that to be sufficient. I wrote it in the summer between my second and third year (August 2019). There were many resources available compared to the INBDE, so I decided to write Part 1. If you decide to write Part 1, you will have to write Part 2 sometime in 2022 at the latest, so be sure to factor that into your plans. 
    I found that my school covered most topics but I did have to do some self studying myself. Generally similar topics get repeated on the exam so having many resources was helpful. 
    PM me if you have any other questions!
     
  5. Thanks
    WomboCombo got a reaction from HopefulDDS in NBDE Part I   
    I studied for 3 weeks and found that to be sufficient. I wrote it in the summer between my second and third year (August 2019). There were many resources available compared to the INBDE, so I decided to write Part 1. If you decide to write Part 1, you will have to write Part 2 sometime in 2022 at the latest, so be sure to factor that into your plans. 
    I found that my school covered most topics but I did have to do some self studying myself. Generally similar topics get repeated on the exam so having many resources was helpful. 
    PM me if you have any other questions!
     
  6. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to wuzzie in 2020 UofT Dental school Interview Accepted/Rejected   
    Hi all!
    Anyone has tips on MMI? 
    Is it just typical scenario based MMI whereby they give you a situation or ethical dilemma and I have to give my opinions? 
    Anyone who has gone through UofT dental MMI in the past few years please advise! 
    I find it a bit strange because the CASPer test is basically a typed out scenario based MMI, and I don't know whether the interview will be the same thing except that it is verbal.  
    Or does that mean the MMI is different from CASPer (eg. acting, drawing etc)?
  7. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to TheDiabeticDentist in 2020 UofT Dental school Interview Accepted/Rejected   
    Invite! (graduated, taking a gap year)
     
    GPA: 3.87 (3 year gpa with summer courses)
    DAT: 23 AA, PAT 21
    Casper: was unsure tbh, didn't really practice that much but had lots of personal experiences for questions I answered!
     
  8. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from 278639123 in How much will I really make?   
    Based on what people close to me have said about their graduating classes, new grads have been averaging around 120k in the GTA (but I personally know someone doing more than double this, albeit on more days of the week) but many who work outside of the GTA earn 150-175k+ on average. I would say the sample size is quite decently large that it does reflect an adequate picture. Those who have a busier schedule after a year or two in can earn closer to 175-225k assuming they are not seeing too many HSO/ODSP/OW patients. In the GTA, some offices waive co-pays and/or have associates see quite a few ODSP/OW patients so this will bring the average down. If you can find a position where you are busy and you are reimbursed at or near the fee guide 95%+ of the time, you can definitely hit 200k as an associate.
    Owning is a different story. Owning allows you to have a hygiene program which increases your revenue and your take home. Additionally, if you run an efficient office, your overhead will decide how much you can take home (but generally many people just take out enough from their corp and reinvest into the office and/or divert their earnings into other streams). You also can decide to keep more procedures in house and/or bring a specialist in which allows you to make a cut as well so the income generally for owners is going to be a significant bump compared to associates.
    I personally know some of the posters on this forum who are practicing and they have decided to earn the amount they earn as a result of choice. They are happy with their situations as longer term associates. People who I know who are owners are also happy with their situation (financially as well) but know that they have more stress than their associate colleagues.
    In dentistry, it's up to you as to how much you want to make and it's based on location, clinical speed, procedures you want to do, hygiene program, procedures kept in house, number of active patients, etc. There are no real averages and the sky is the limit. Hope this helps!
  9. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to Coronaxtra in The slow decay of dentistry   
    A few of my friends have been practicing for exactly 1 year now. These stats might be useful for people looking to gain some info on the associate market in different areas.
    1) Practicing in rural Alberta (~2 hours east of Edmonton) --> 220k pre-tax working 6 days a week
    2) Practicing in GTA --> 150k pre-tax working 5 days a week
    3) Practicing 1.5 hours outside GTA --> 175k pre-tax working 5 days a week
    4) Practicing in Calgary --> 180k pre-tax working 5 days a week
    Although income does depend on types of procedures, days you work, etc., it does seem imo that dentistry is still a great profession.
    But if your taking out 350-500k loans for dental school, its better to go into another profession. If your parents can afford to pay for dental school and you have zero/minimal debt, then definitely go and be ahead of the curve so that you can buy clinics and have a higher income pretty quickly. 
  10. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to RIF22 in Got into dental school... What's next?   
    Allô! Mon anglais n'est pas très bon, alors je te répondrai en français en espérant que tu comprennes!

    Je veux tout d'abord te dire que je me sens exactement comme toi, et ça me fait du bien de voir que je ne suis pas seul. Je rêve de médecine depuis que je suis tout petit, et maintenant que j'y suis accepté, je me questionne à savoir si j'y serai vraiment heureux. J'ai parlé à plusieurs résidents qui semblent regretter leur choix et qui présentent même des symptômes de burn-out; ce n'est pas rassurant. Pour m'aider, je pense à ceux qui sont dans la profession, toujours passionnés; toutes les histoires ne sont pas tristes, au contraire!!!!
    Je pense qu'en mettant autant d'effort afin d'atteindre notre but, on vient à idéaliser la profession. Ça reste une job, il y aura certainement des hauts et des bas! Et au pire, si ce n'est pas pour toi, tu changes/switch pour quelque chose d'autre. Mais je pense que tu n'en arriveras surement pas là (et j'espère que moi non plus). Selon mon expérience, il semble normal d'avoir des doutes, mais c'est en le faisant que tu le découvriras. Aussi, si tu as voulu être dentiste depuis si longtemps.... il y a surement plusieurs raisons! Essaie de te rappeler ce qui te motivait au début (moi ça m'aide!).
    Finalement, je te dis : profite de ton été, car les prochaines années seront très chargées! Bonne chance pour la suite  
  11. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from ace777 in How much will I really make?   
    Based on what people close to me have said about their graduating classes, new grads have been averaging around 120k in the GTA (but I personally know someone doing more than double this, albeit on more days of the week) but many who work outside of the GTA earn 150-175k+ on average. I would say the sample size is quite decently large that it does reflect an adequate picture. Those who have a busier schedule after a year or two in can earn closer to 175-225k assuming they are not seeing too many HSO/ODSP/OW patients. In the GTA, some offices waive co-pays and/or have associates see quite a few ODSP/OW patients so this will bring the average down. If you can find a position where you are busy and you are reimbursed at or near the fee guide 95%+ of the time, you can definitely hit 200k as an associate.
    Owning is a different story. Owning allows you to have a hygiene program which increases your revenue and your take home. Additionally, if you run an efficient office, your overhead will decide how much you can take home (but generally many people just take out enough from their corp and reinvest into the office and/or divert their earnings into other streams). You also can decide to keep more procedures in house and/or bring a specialist in which allows you to make a cut as well so the income generally for owners is going to be a significant bump compared to associates.
    I personally know some of the posters on this forum who are practicing and they have decided to earn the amount they earn as a result of choice. They are happy with their situations as longer term associates. People who I know who are owners are also happy with their situation (financially as well) but know that they have more stress than their associate colleagues.
    In dentistry, it's up to you as to how much you want to make and it's based on location, clinical speed, procedures you want to do, hygiene program, procedures kept in house, number of active patients, etc. There are no real averages and the sky is the limit. Hope this helps!
  12. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to McMarauder in Financial aspect of attending Australian vs Canadian school   
    dental education is completely lacking on the business side... which does not make sense.

    Glad to have helped.  Like the people in this thread, I was in their position 8 years ago.  Finished undergrad, applied to Australia for dental school and got in.  I thought my life was set... 4 years out of dental school, and my life is far from what I expected it to be.  It's important to have an idea of how things will be after dental school.
  13. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from yonas in What Is The Best Speciality To Go Into?   
    Mononoke, I agree and I would add psych too. PM&R was pretty competitive this year and this may be a trend? Derm is something that is pretty hard to bank on haha. Anaes has a tough job market according to another thread comparing anaes to IM subspecs
  14. Thanks
    WomboCombo got a reaction from ruvi24 in UWO vs UofT Opinions   
    Great questions  here's a few more things I can add to my previous post about U of T now that I'm in second year:
    Curriculum: Some courses try their best to update what they teach to match what is out there in the real world. In endo, we get to try out WaveOne Gold. In prostho, the second year course has been updated to include more about implants and partial dentures that exceed some of what the current fourth years have learned. I had the chance to have dinner with the course directors of prostho and they are very open to changes in the course. They appreciate any feedback, including negative feedback and try to find ways to make sure that students have a better grasp of the course before going into clinic. Resto is still a bit outdated but it is good that we learn some aesthetic dentistry (veneers) and we get to try out the CAD/CAM crown milling machine. Perio, while it is didactic, is quite updated in terms of surgical procedures and even the classification scheme for periodontal disease. Most course directors are open to changes in their courses and I am working with other students to update and improve the curriculum (e.g. trying to implement more restorative in first year). It is also possible to move exam/test days around so that it can be more manageable - profs are often open to changes ahead of time. 
    Student Environment: There's a place for everyone. A large class means you will be able to find people to connect with. Students are generally happy at the school and the school is working on ways to improve student experience. Mental health talks, free coffee/snacks on Wednesdays, and many opportunities to get involved are just some of the things that students have responded positively to. 
    Staff Quality: Generally good. Yes, there are some staff who the students may not have the best time with but with the way the courses are structured - demos/hygienists rotate every so often so it evens out. Non-dentist/hygienist staff are generally nice but sometimes can give you a bit of an attitude. There are various ways for you to let the course director or student leadership know about this and changes may be able to be made. Faculty are generally happy to meet with you (sometimes they have an open door policy) and many feel invested in your education. If you want to shadow the grad clinics, it is not a problem at all. 
    Involvement Opportunities: There are a lot of opportunities - often it's easy to lose track of them. Many leadership opportunities, many intramural teams, and many volunteering/fundraising opportunities, etc. If you find that you want to start an organization, that is possible too. A few of my classmates started a Women in Dentistry group and they have been doing quite well so far! There are plenty of opportunities to do research as well - U of T is big on academia. 
    Etc.: Western and Toronto have their own pros and cons. Dental school is tough for most students so a big factor to consider is living/attending somewhere that you feel will make you happiest. U of T is not a perfect program and like many Canadian schools - is not the strongest clinically - but it is in a city that has something for everyone. I did my undergrad at Western and enjoyed my time in London, but Toronto is a very different experience. The question is if you prefer this type of experience over living in London.
  15. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from toothurty in UWO vs UofT Opinions   
    Great questions  here's a few more things I can add to my previous post about U of T now that I'm in second year:
    Curriculum: Some courses try their best to update what they teach to match what is out there in the real world. In endo, we get to try out WaveOne Gold. In prostho, the second year course has been updated to include more about implants and partial dentures that exceed some of what the current fourth years have learned. I had the chance to have dinner with the course directors of prostho and they are very open to changes in the course. They appreciate any feedback, including negative feedback and try to find ways to make sure that students have a better grasp of the course before going into clinic. Resto is still a bit outdated but it is good that we learn some aesthetic dentistry (veneers) and we get to try out the CAD/CAM crown milling machine. Perio, while it is didactic, is quite updated in terms of surgical procedures and even the classification scheme for periodontal disease. Most course directors are open to changes in their courses and I am working with other students to update and improve the curriculum (e.g. trying to implement more restorative in first year). It is also possible to move exam/test days around so that it can be more manageable - profs are often open to changes ahead of time. 
    Student Environment: There's a place for everyone. A large class means you will be able to find people to connect with. Students are generally happy at the school and the school is working on ways to improve student experience. Mental health talks, free coffee/snacks on Wednesdays, and many opportunities to get involved are just some of the things that students have responded positively to. 
    Staff Quality: Generally good. Yes, there are some staff who the students may not have the best time with but with the way the courses are structured - demos/hygienists rotate every so often so it evens out. Non-dentist/hygienist staff are generally nice but sometimes can give you a bit of an attitude. There are various ways for you to let the course director or student leadership know about this and changes may be able to be made. Faculty are generally happy to meet with you (sometimes they have an open door policy) and many feel invested in your education. If you want to shadow the grad clinics, it is not a problem at all. 
    Involvement Opportunities: There are a lot of opportunities - often it's easy to lose track of them. Many leadership opportunities, many intramural teams, and many volunteering/fundraising opportunities, etc. If you find that you want to start an organization, that is possible too. A few of my classmates started a Women in Dentistry group and they have been doing quite well so far! There are plenty of opportunities to do research as well - U of T is big on academia. 
    Etc.: Western and Toronto have their own pros and cons. Dental school is tough for most students so a big factor to consider is living/attending somewhere that you feel will make you happiest. U of T is not a perfect program and like many Canadian schools - is not the strongest clinically - but it is in a city that has something for everyone. I did my undergrad at Western and enjoyed my time in London, but Toronto is a very different experience. The question is if you prefer this type of experience over living in London.
  16. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to longhaul in UWO vs UofT Opinions   
    Majority of what toothurty and Steins;Gate discussed above also applies to western in regards to curriculum, environment, staff quality, and involvement opportunities

    Some specifics:
    - Class rankings are not communicated
    - We also have the AO frat, as does UofT
    - Perio classifications are updated to the current standards in our didactic and clinical education to ensure the expected standard of care
    - Our issues are quite easily communicated with profs, since majority know us by first name basis (rescheduling exams, clinical case discussions with profs, etc)
    - We have a student issues committee which has faculty advisers and allows the student voice to be considered in admin decision making.
    - We learn and get the opportunity to restore implants in 3rd and 4th year
    - In 2nd year we are able to use dental microscopes in sim clinic. Rotary WaveOne Gold and Vortex systems are mandatory for each RCT. We utilize these as well in main clinic in 3rd and 4th year
    - 3 year old sim clinic with personal computers and screens at each station connected to instructor demo area
    - Digital charting and xrays in all clinics; we utilize digital xrays in sim
    - We begin shadowing and assisting February of 1st year on a weekly basis
    - 1st year exams are condensed for only the month of December. For the rest of the year, you have midterms and finals spread out. You have from March-May where you're chilling and majority of focus is on operative
    - With a class of 56, it's quite an optimal size to also have the opportunity to meet people you enjoy being around. Class activities and outings are much easier to coordinate and plan with the smaller size. For those you'd rather not communicate to on a daily basis, you have plenty of opportunity to do that. The small class size also provides the benefit of shorter lines for digital xrays, wet lab and cast trimming machines
    - Plenty of UWO students place in american specialties (paedo, OMFS, endo) and GPRs/AEGDs, including top ranked programs - to say that american schools favor UofT grads because of reputation is misinformation/anecdotal

    Both schools will give you a DDS. There will be things at both schools you have to supplement with CE's afterwards.
    Make your decision based on personal reasons (finances, living, distance from family etc) rather than what education you will be receiving, since both schools are on similar footing despite what you may read on premed101
  17. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Ms. Chip Skylark in Western Abs/ps   
    Category (Maximum # of Entries)

    Awards (5) - Starting from undergrad onwards

    Employment (5) - Starting from undergrad onwards

    Hobbies (3)

    Leadership/Teamwork Skills (5)  - Starting from undergrad onwards

    Shadowing/Dentistry Experience (5)

    Research (No Max)  - Starting from undergrad onwards

    Volunteer (5) - Starting from undergrad onwards

     

    I didn't max employment (had 3) and shadowing/dentistry experience (had 2) but maxed everything else and had 3 entries for research. 

     

    Deadline is first few weekdays of January (may vary slightly from year to year). You can definitely start and finish it all over the winter break (2 weeks is more than enough if you focus). I think the ABS/PS comes out early Nov but please correct me if I am wrong.

  18. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from ricktheshambler in UWO schulich dentistry 2018 accepted/rejected/waitlist   
    Congratulations to everyone accepted - one of the users here also received good news last year and was so ecstatic to the point of being "very sweaty" (you know who you are)  . It's a surreal feeling that you will never forget! Welcome to the wonderful profession of dentistry. 
    I have a few buddies waitlisted and I know it sucks. You are honestly so close and at the interview stage, there is a bit of luck involved. Some of the advice I gave my friends included: 1) taking the day off to chill (feel unhappy/sad and get it out of your system, you need some time to unwind a bit), 2) expect nothing and hope for the best (if the waitlist gets to you awesome but don't expect it to... treat it as a pleasant surprise), and 3) have plans for next cycle (will you continue your job? do more volunteering and shadowing? travel, etc.?). You likely did your best in the interview so it may have been the slimmest of margins in terms of being accepted versus waitlisted. Don't be too tough on yourself.
    If you have gotten to the interview stage, it means on paper you are qualified to be a dental student. If this was not your year, it will be your year very soon... just brush up on those interview skills and you will receive an offer eventually! Best of luck to fellow waitlisters and to those rejected, keep working on that application and keep trying - you will eventually get there.
  19. Like
    WomboCombo reacted to cleanup in Third Year Clinical Experience   
    I teach third years on occasion. You guys have literally just started interacting with patients in a way that goes beyond hygiene/cleanings. It's completely normal for this to feel foreign, awkward, nerve-wracking, anxiety-inducing, the-walls-are-closing-on-me-please-end-this-now. And in a school environment, it can be really strange since you feel like there are multiple people breathing down your neck. It's for this reason I really try to take a different approach most instructors do with students; I'm there to help you guys learn, to make the situation enjoyable and fun and as casual as possible, not berate or put you down for doing something I wouldn't do or differently than I think you should. It's completely unreasonable for me to expect you to know exactly what to do, how to do it, when to do it, and then execute it to my standards. The truth is, when you walk out of clinic, you shouldn't be pondering "Did I do good? Did I do that well?" you should be thinking, "Did I learn something today? Yes. Okay. Good. Onto the next."
    I know it's hard not to get tunnel vision with what you're doing, but try to take a step back and realize that you're there to learn. You are indeed, there to make mistakes. I know that sounds catastrophically wrong, but it's the truth. It is a school, first and foremost, not a dental clinic. The patients receiving care bit is sort of just a necessary consequence. I assure you that, in the end, although it's a long road, it all evens out, and your learning continues heavily into private practice.
    I'm 3 years into private practice and only now can I say that I feel pretty confident with 90-95% of the situations I encounter on a daily basis in general practice. I still refer things out, and even with some bread-and-butter things I still run into trouble, because it's the nature of it. But I approach situations like this differently. I used to approach it with the occasional "I'm not sure what the fuck is going on here" mentality and allow fear or anxiety to take hold. Now I approach it with the mindset of "I'm just here to do my best and take good care of my patient and maybe learn somethign along the way" and I allow that to take me wherever it may. It has allowed me to become a better dentist, both clinically and non-clinically.
    You're not just a student of dentistry, you're a student of life. Treat it that way and you'll feel less anxious about your situation. Zoom out a little bit. It'll be fine.
  20. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Waves in How much will I really make?   
    Based on what people close to me have said about their graduating classes, new grads have been averaging around 120k in the GTA (but I personally know someone doing more than double this, albeit on more days of the week) but many who work outside of the GTA earn 150-175k+ on average. I would say the sample size is quite decently large that it does reflect an adequate picture. Those who have a busier schedule after a year or two in can earn closer to 175-225k assuming they are not seeing too many HSO/ODSP/OW patients. In the GTA, some offices waive co-pays and/or have associates see quite a few ODSP/OW patients so this will bring the average down. If you can find a position where you are busy and you are reimbursed at or near the fee guide 95%+ of the time, you can definitely hit 200k as an associate.
    Owning is a different story. Owning allows you to have a hygiene program which increases your revenue and your take home. Additionally, if you run an efficient office, your overhead will decide how much you can take home (but generally many people just take out enough from their corp and reinvest into the office and/or divert their earnings into other streams). You also can decide to keep more procedures in house and/or bring a specialist in which allows you to make a cut as well so the income generally for owners is going to be a significant bump compared to associates.
    I personally know some of the posters on this forum who are practicing and they have decided to earn the amount they earn as a result of choice. They are happy with their situations as longer term associates. People who I know who are owners are also happy with their situation (financially as well) but know that they have more stress than their associate colleagues.
    In dentistry, it's up to you as to how much you want to make and it's based on location, clinical speed, procedures you want to do, hygiene program, procedures kept in house, number of active patients, etc. There are no real averages and the sky is the limit. Hope this helps!
  21. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from ysoNaCly in How much will I really make?   
    Based on what people close to me have said about their graduating classes, new grads have been averaging around 120k in the GTA (but I personally know someone doing more than double this, albeit on more days of the week) but many who work outside of the GTA earn 150-175k+ on average. I would say the sample size is quite decently large that it does reflect an adequate picture. Those who have a busier schedule after a year or two in can earn closer to 175-225k assuming they are not seeing too many HSO/ODSP/OW patients. In the GTA, some offices waive co-pays and/or have associates see quite a few ODSP/OW patients so this will bring the average down. If you can find a position where you are busy and you are reimbursed at or near the fee guide 95%+ of the time, you can definitely hit 200k as an associate.
    Owning is a different story. Owning allows you to have a hygiene program which increases your revenue and your take home. Additionally, if you run an efficient office, your overhead will decide how much you can take home (but generally many people just take out enough from their corp and reinvest into the office and/or divert their earnings into other streams). You also can decide to keep more procedures in house and/or bring a specialist in which allows you to make a cut as well so the income generally for owners is going to be a significant bump compared to associates.
    I personally know some of the posters on this forum who are practicing and they have decided to earn the amount they earn as a result of choice. They are happy with their situations as longer term associates. People who I know who are owners are also happy with their situation (financially as well) but know that they have more stress than their associate colleagues.
    In dentistry, it's up to you as to how much you want to make and it's based on location, clinical speed, procedures you want to do, hygiene program, procedures kept in house, number of active patients, etc. There are no real averages and the sky is the limit. Hope this helps!
  22. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Starburst in How much will I really make?   
    Based on what people close to me have said about their graduating classes, new grads have been averaging around 120k in the GTA (but I personally know someone doing more than double this, albeit on more days of the week) but many who work outside of the GTA earn 150-175k+ on average. I would say the sample size is quite decently large that it does reflect an adequate picture. Those who have a busier schedule after a year or two in can earn closer to 175-225k assuming they are not seeing too many HSO/ODSP/OW patients. In the GTA, some offices waive co-pays and/or have associates see quite a few ODSP/OW patients so this will bring the average down. If you can find a position where you are busy and you are reimbursed at or near the fee guide 95%+ of the time, you can definitely hit 200k as an associate.
    Owning is a different story. Owning allows you to have a hygiene program which increases your revenue and your take home. Additionally, if you run an efficient office, your overhead will decide how much you can take home (but generally many people just take out enough from their corp and reinvest into the office and/or divert their earnings into other streams). You also can decide to keep more procedures in house and/or bring a specialist in which allows you to make a cut as well so the income generally for owners is going to be a significant bump compared to associates.
    I personally know some of the posters on this forum who are practicing and they have decided to earn the amount they earn as a result of choice. They are happy with their situations as longer term associates. People who I know who are owners are also happy with their situation (financially as well) but know that they have more stress than their associate colleagues.
    In dentistry, it's up to you as to how much you want to make and it's based on location, clinical speed, procedures you want to do, hygiene program, procedures kept in house, number of active patients, etc. There are no real averages and the sky is the limit. Hope this helps!
  23. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Fentist in UofT/UWO Waitlist movement   
    I'm going to share a story about one of my buddies in the first year class at U of T. This person applied 3 times and was waitlisted the first two times (and never got off the waitlist as the waitlist # was well beyond #30). The third time, this person applied again (same DAT/GPA as previous years) and improved on their personality test (after realizing that this played an important part of the overall file score) and got in directly. 
    The point I am trying to make is that the difference between waitlist and straight offer is just improving one aspect of the interview process. To all who have received interviews and are on the waitlist, please do not feel the need to re-write your DAT (unless it is expiring) or improve your GPA unless you are a 3rd year student. Really spend the year trying to improve your interview skills and apply to a broader selection of schools. You are so very close and do not feel discouraged if you do not get off the waitlist. It is such a competitive process that the smallest of margins makes a bigger difference than one would expect. And of course there is lots of luck involved so do not be too hard on yourself.
    If anyone needs help planning for next cycle, I'm all ears and a PM away.
  24. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Ms. Chip Skylark in EC for UWO?   
    Shadowing would be key - not just for the application but also come interview time. I found that people in the year I applied had strong grades but did not get an interview because of their personal statement and extracurriculars. Research would be nice but overall if you could have entries for each aspect of the extracurricular section in the application, that would be ideal. Even work experience is important. Every little bit helps.
     
  25. Like
    WomboCombo got a reaction from Soltan in EC for UWO?   
    Shadowing would be key - not just for the application but also come interview time. I found that people in the year I applied had strong grades but did not get an interview because of their personal statement and extracurriculars. Research would be nice but overall if you could have entries for each aspect of the extracurricular section in the application, that would be ideal. Even work experience is important. Every little bit helps.
     
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