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RicardoKaká

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  1. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Ali-oop in Is passion necessary to be a doctor?   
    30 year grad/ practitioner, former uni instructor and ad com member here, borrowing a member's account to comment. Let me say that from every aforementioned perspective of mine, passion in applicants and practitioners is key- our patients deserve no less. 
    As a practitioner, the difference between those of us who love what we do and those who do not, rests primarily with whether or not we quite literally 'love' what we do. Loving what you do requires passion- yes it does. For those entering this career with the attitude that 'it's a job' but that they will nonetheless be truly dedicated to it to the extent required to be an excellent practitioner in our Canadian system, you are doing your prospective patients and the profession a disservice. I see far too many that are in this for all the wrong reasons- money, prestige- who are burned out and resentful, and complacent in their practice. Are those characteristics you as a patient wish in your physician?  Our system requires extraordinary dedication and long, irregular hours given we could use many more of almost every specialty to meet Canada's needs, and I've yet to see the confluence of a satisfied, dedicated and excellent practitioner and one who chose medicine because 'it's a job'. If you lack passion, you will in all likelihood succumb to burnout, dissatisfaction and that will reflect in your practice. 
    As an instructor/ ad com member, I can say that we are inundated with ample academically qualified applicants, and we ought to begin screening for demonstrated dedication and passion to healthcare from amongst them. Over my career, I have seen an evolution in the attitudes of  medical students which has brought us to exactly where we are now- too many in this for all the wrong reasons. I see far too many students who look at medicine as what it can do for / "owes" them,  ( money, prestige, 'regular' hours....) rather than what they can do for it.  I have taught students who say they "like medicine", but "not the not patients"- preposterous, yes, and entirely too common now. The profession and those we serve ( who, I might add, also pay us) deserve much more. 
    So please, to those of you with whom this is resonating, leave the competition for those who would are both academically qualified and passionate. Given the numbers of applicants to medicine, there is no reason whatsoever our system can't have both. I have two children, both of whom thought they would like to become physicians. My son, quite honestly, for all the wrong reasons- and I steered him away. He is now happily studying finance where he can dedicate himself to making all the money in the world. On the other hand, when my daughter, who is a compassionate and caring soul, expressed her interest in medicine, I encouraged her to do her undergrad in a health profession, for exposure to healthcare both as practice and as a system. She has proven to herself now as an RN  to those with whom she works, and to those she serves, and she is ready to begin medical studies for all the right reasons.
  2. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to robclem21 in Making decisions about specialty..   
    While, I get that you are passionate about family medicine, and I agree, its a great speciality for many reasons, I feel you are painting a bit of an unfair picture of most specialties and grouping many into a single category when thats not in fact the reality. Despite the positive elements of FM that you presented here, I personally would not find any job satisfaction in doing that day to day. Even with a good lifestyle and work-life balance (which some might argue is even better in some specialities), it is important to be happy with the work you do day to do and not just get by because its an easier path.
    More than half of graduates still pursue a field that is not family medicine, and majority of those do not do so for the "prestige" or "income potential". Feeling the need to impress tends to subside with time, and while the path to practice is certainly longer for other specialties, it's important to ultimately do something you are happy doing. If that is FM then great, but if not, it's important to know that it's not all bad as presented above.
    I am in a 5-year speciality that likely wont REQUIRE a fellowship for a job down the road, and I can say I don't feel limited to ANY of what the response above has mentioned (limited to one body system, working in a place I don't want to, bad work-life balance, need to impress attendings, scrambling for research, etc.)
    Important to have a balanced opinion when making a decision.
  3. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Bambi in Self-employment on ABS?   
    To me, this is « self-employment », which would go under “employment”. As for a vérifier, why not a customer, a user of your services or product provided. 
  4. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from whinyredditor in Fourth year away electives   
    I assume you are entering your third year of studies.
    Hopefully COVID situation improves but there may be a chance you don’t get visiting electives next year (current boat I am in). You can definitely get a letter in a 2-week rotation, just have to work hard, do extra work and show interest.
    generally speaking most people get letters on their elective rotations which are on average 2-weeks in length unless you are doing a CTU elective for IM, which in those instances are usually 3-week in length.
    Not sure what you mean by front loading. Although CARMS apps open early in 4th year, letters of references are not typically due until closer to the end of your elective period but generally you want to do your program of interest electives pre CARMS app deadlines.
    so in short
    1. pray you get visiting electives if you are hoping to spend time out of your home school.
    2. Yes you can get a strong letter in a 2-week rotation 
    cheers 
  5. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from MDinCanada in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    Haha well vascular nor general surgery are the specialties I hope to pursue for the rest of my life (although I have nothing against them). Nevertheless, there’s always a story behind why a patient is presenting at this particular time, and sometimes we might not always agree with how they got there, but that is life and we just have to do our best for our patients no matter the prognosis or outlook on their disease that they may have. 
     
    However you are right, there is a lot of administrative BS and frustrating things that we have to put up with, which is only made worse when you have to do these things in the middle of the night. I just finished my IM rotation and the amount of BS that my senior had to do on call which prevented them from sleeping was pretty ass and I did not envy it. Perhaps I will think differently after residency,  but so far throughout medical school I haven’t once doubted my decision. 
     
    I also definitely agree that medicine isn’t as glamorous as social media and TV shows can portray it to be. I would thus encourage all applicants to really self-reflect and think about what becoming a doctor entails, and the sacrifices you might need to make throughout the entirety of your training and career before jumping into it. 
  6. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from MDinCanada in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I’d just like to share my two cents on this topic. 

    My brother is 1-year older than me and works in business (has both his CPA/CFAs) and works downtown Toronto in finance now. I’m just finishing up medical school and did a MSc prior to starting. 
     
    My brother earns ~200K in his field before taxes, is very wise with investing his money and lives a relatively frugal life despite his income. He also still has room to climb and make more money in his field but is complacent with his current income. He already has the funds to buy a home in the GTA if he so chose to do so today. He works probably 60 hours/week on average.
    I myself however am 150K in the hole and plan on pursuing a 5-year surgical specialty residency. Realistically by the time I pay off my loans I’ll be 35. Then making let’s say 500K/year for 30 years. I believe my brother will be wealthier than I will be by the time we both hit our 60s and he probably will have long retired by then.
    On the other hand, my brother doesn’t find his job satisfying and he works to live. He plans on retiring at the earliest age possible that will support his dream retirement lifestyle. My self on the other hand, love the career of medicine. I am also a workaholic by nature and think that medicine satisfies my work cravings as there is always unfinished work to do it seems. Although I am still only a medical student I feel a certain energy coursing through my veins going into work everyday. Constantly learning, and the ability to interact with compassion and empathy towards patients when they are at their most vulnerable excites me. Looking back, I always ponder if my work-ethic would have been better suited in business or engineering, but when I have these thoughts and compare myself to my brother, I don’t think I would be as satisfied with that type of work. 
  7. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from readytostresseat in Is being a doctor worth it?   
    I’d just like to share my two cents on this topic. 

    My brother is 1-year older than me and works in business (has both his CPA/CFAs) and works downtown Toronto in finance now. I’m just finishing up medical school and did a MSc prior to starting. 
     
    My brother earns ~200K in his field before taxes, is very wise with investing his money and lives a relatively frugal life despite his income. He also still has room to climb and make more money in his field but is complacent with his current income. He already has the funds to buy a home in the GTA if he so chose to do so today. He works probably 60 hours/week on average.
    I myself however am 150K in the hole and plan on pursuing a 5-year surgical specialty residency. Realistically by the time I pay off my loans I’ll be 35. Then making let’s say 500K/year for 30 years. I believe my brother will be wealthier than I will be by the time we both hit our 60s and he probably will have long retired by then.
    On the other hand, my brother doesn’t find his job satisfying and he works to live. He plans on retiring at the earliest age possible that will support his dream retirement lifestyle. My self on the other hand, love the career of medicine. I am also a workaholic by nature and think that medicine satisfies my work cravings as there is always unfinished work to do it seems. Although I am still only a medical student I feel a certain energy coursing through my veins going into work everyday. Constantly learning, and the ability to interact with compassion and empathy towards patients when they are at their most vulnerable excites me. Looking back, I always ponder if my work-ethic would have been better suited in business or engineering, but when I have these thoughts and compare myself to my brother, I don’t think I would be as satisfied with that type of work. 
  8. Thanks
    RicardoKaká reacted to bruh in ENT Salary   
    $460K national average ($710K in AB!) According to this: 
    And $443K according to the CIHI:
    https://www.cihi.ca/sites/default/files/document/physicians-in-canada-2018.pdf
     
    the only source I know of is 32% overhead based on CMA: 
    https://www.cma.ca/sites/default/files/2019-01/otolaryngology-e.pdf#page10
    hopefully someone with more info can chime in. 
     
    EDIT: found this 2012 study on Ontario physicians. Overhead is 32% here for ENT as well:

  9. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from Remyelination in International medical schools   
    Agree with other posters, wouldnt recommend doing this for numerous reasons. Many of my friends are fighting very hard to come back to Canada after going abroad. 
    Super high expenses going abroad (tuition, living), numerous exams that require high scores to get back. More loops and hurdles and still less odds you get to practice as the type of doctor you want to be.
    Just go to university, enjoy your life and work hard. Life isnt just about getting into medical school and becoming a doctor. You have to enjoy the path to becoming one. This will in turn probably make you a better doctor anyway.
  10. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from bellejolie in COVID-19 Impact on Electives and Clerkships   
    Totally agree. I definitely think this situation will help some and hurt others. I truly think showing commitment to a given specialty (especially smaller competitive ones) may be looked at more favourably and may bear more weight when it comes to securing interviews across Canada since they may have to look more at the C.V. this year (I have heard in some smaller surgical specialties that the C.V. is not even read by staff, and mostly residents).
  11. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Edict in Frustrated with the admissions system   
    Great point, this system is definitely not fair or equitable. I put the blame less on the medical schools themselves and more on the state of our education system in general. In high school, kids are oddly given an easy time, there is no standardized testing and your grades depend more on your individual teacher's biases than your learning as a student. Then in undergrad, the system is so laissez-faire that the smartest way to get into medical school is not to study what you are good at, but to choose the right program and the right courses to get yourself the highest GPA, interest in learning be damned. 
    Ultimately, this system screws over far too many people and people are left doing degree after degree, masters etc, all to be ultimately underemployed. Our system is failing to distribute talent well. In fact, I would argue for a limit on the number of students that should even be studying the life sciences. Its a joke that we make people spend 4 years chasing a med school dream only then to tell them that in order to get any job remotely related to their field, it'll be at least another 2 years of schooling. 
    My bias is that, the government for years has been chasing the "% of population university educated" stat as a measure of its success and while good intentioned is an incredibly flawed statistic. Just making people do 4 years of university while making the populace generally less bigoted and uninformed, also fails to address the appropriate distribution of human resources. We have way too many life science majors in Canada (The single largest group of undergrads at UofT study either Life sciences or Engineering/physical sciences), especially in Ontario and not enough jobs for them all. We have way too many university grads in general, with way too few good well paying jobs for them all. This ultimately results in the phenomenon of people with 4 yr bachelor degrees going to college for training that is practical. One could easily argue those people would have been better off financially if they had just gone straight into college instead. 
     
  12. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to MedSchoolHope101 in Frustrated with the admissions system   
    Here is a blog post that links to 2 studies that confirm the overwhelming majority of students come from a high SES background. Please be careful when making such statements as it perpetuates the idea that entry to medical school is equally challenging from students of all backgrounds when, in fact, it is not.
    https://cmajblogs.com/addressing-the-income-gap-in-medical-school/
  13. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from LittleMonkey101 in RBC's new LOC $325,000 max at prime -0.25   
    Thanks for the information. Fair enough, yes definitely being lenient on other insidious fees that will likely put oneself in a stump while trying to pay off the LOC. I wonder how the comparison could be made when going for a non-FM specialty (i.e. Surgery for example). More years of residency at lower income but higher overall pay at the end. Has anyone ever calculated this to see theoretically who could pay off their LOC quicker? (Ex. FM vs. Surgery).
    I assume the interest accrual on the LOC throughout the 5 year residency + life (family, mortgages etc.) would maybe mean that FM doctors pay off their debt quicker compared to the 5-year residency counterpart.
  14. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Aetherus in Question Regarding Electives   
    I think it will be difficult to assess how people will interpret your elective spread with the new mandated 8 week cap. Anyone giving you advice at this time is purely speculating as we have no idea how programs will assess your application once this huge change is implemented.
  15. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Redpill in Question Regarding Electives   
    They are in the first cohort that has the 8-week cap on electives in any one discipline. The concern is that if you evenly split your electives between two surgical specialties, you may look less committed to either compared to someone who maxed out their 8 weeks in ENT (or Gen Surg) and did only did surgically-related electives for the rest.
  16. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to NLengr in Question Regarding Electives   
    Why do any anesthesia or CCU electives (unless forced to do so)? If possible, only do electives in the specialty (or specialties) you are interested in.
  17. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Intrepid86 in "Are you sure you want to go into family?"   
    There are many specialists who feel at least slightly offended when someone chooses family medicine over their specialty, mostly because of their pre-existing low opinion of the latter. Just keep in mind that their bruised ego is temporary, but your choice is permanent.
  18. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from rolandofgilead in 5+ Verifiers Have Been Contacted - Is That Weird?   
    I wouldn't be surprised if every verifier in the system was contacted through an automatically email generated system.
     
    One of my verifiers wanted me to be there with them when they opened up the email they got from UBC (they aren't that technically inclined). It was an email that had a link to the application system page, it showed the hours/description of the activity and asked the verifier to click "Yes" and type their name in a box.
     
    My guess that this was actually sent to all verifiers. But who knows!
  19. Like
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from KinderSurprise in Ottawa Interview Discussion/countdown To May 9 2017   
    The thought of actually getting into medicine keeps me up at night and gets me up early in the morning, what a rollercoaster journey these past few years have been. Have hope everyone  
  20. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Edict in Neurosurgery vs Peds General Surgery vs Orthopedics Lifestyle   
    If you ask senior surgeons though, the job hour limitations may have also had an impact on the increasing number of years needed to practice. Truthfully though, the best way may really be to reduce the number of residency spots in these specialties.
    It may also be important for trainees as a whole to lower salary expectations in general. If you are still willing to do a specialty despite a 30% pay cut, then this may be the right choice for you. I do believe that the incentives in non-surgical specialties are much better than surgical specialties if you are looking at years of training x hours worked x salary. 
  21. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to JohnGrisham in Is it worth it to switch to medicine from optometry?   
    ? And how many ODs do you know who are gunning for ophtho?  Anecdotal at best lol. 

    I know a ophtho resident who did an art-history major and masters in asian studies. Zero research, did 1 elective in M4, liked it and applied and matched. 
  22. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to deeman101 in How do you remember everything you learned in medical school?   
    I hate to break it to the medical students here, especially ones in preclerkship. The curriculum you learn in medical school is not really that practical. What you're really learning is a work ethic and approach to medicine and patient care. It's not found in a text book, but it will set you up well to maximize on clinical opportunities and residency. Just remember when you're in a hospital setting keep your eyes and ears open and let it sink in. Remembering "everything" doesn't make you a good doctor. Trying to do that may even make you a worse one if it's causing you to miss the real lesson. 
  23. Thanks
    RicardoKaká got a reaction from wjl123 in Trying to prep for the CARS section.. tips?   
    Id do a low-yield practice test and check your baseline then go from there. As an engineer I'm certain you favour efficacy. Why do more work if you have to? If you have a high baseline, chances are you dont need to overprep for the CARS section.
    Some other resources to help practice and stimulate the CARS mentality are things like Khan Academy. There are lots out there. If you have extra $$ you can also look into NextStep, Kaplan, TPR, Prep 101 and buy some of their passages/tests.
    Id try not to use AAMC material and too many practice exams though. But doing 1-2 low-yield ones may help establish your baseline and future planning.
    Hope that helps - I did my MCAT years ago so I apologize if there are better prep companies out there these days
     
  24. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to deeman101 in U of T medical student convicted of rape   
    ^ the same surgeons have likely destroyed their fair share of med students and residents.....on a monthly basis.....if not weekly.....for some of them daily. Its funny that you think FM docs are assholes since usually they are on the other end of the spectrum and actually respect the notion of quality of life (not just for patients). Be careful of extrapolating anecdotes.
    Trying to explain why life in medicine is "not what you think" is something I've struggled with for years. My wife, who got in 2 years after me, likes to blame me routinely for not dissuading her from medicine (I did...she didn't listen). I used to participate in medical admissions and I felt bad for some of the candidates. Not because their dreams of medical school may be crushed, but should they get in their genuinely kind-hearted soul will be sent through the meat grinder, broken down, and reformed into......me. The extreme minority (think less than 1/100) go through, keep their humanity intact, and still genuinely enjoy it (we're all good at lying to others and ourselves about how much we "enjoy" it). I'm simultaneously happy for them, but also jealous that I'm not one of them. For the ones that don't get in, I know in the moment their life comes to an end. But I can't help thinking "you've been spared" in my head.
    NLengr is right in that doctors are the least compassionate professionals to their own kind. Our first reaction to one of our colleagues struggling is to look at them with disgust and scoff at them for not being resilient enough. "We all are struggling, I'm pulling my weight, why aren't you??" Even for those with "legitimate" issues (which basically means biologic, and not psychiatric/social issues) they are advised to pick a specialty where they won't be a burden on their colleagues or hide it and keep it to themselves as best as possible. Ex: don't go into a demanding surgical specialty if you have chronic, severe IBD. Often times its up to you to fight (sorry, "advocate") for yourself, because no one else really cares that much about you. But in reality even if one wants to help their colleague they really have limited capacity because everyone is similarly trying to keep their head above the sewage water. 
    I actually think this is why doctors don't throw their colleagues under the bus and we have some trouble self-regulating as a profession. At the end of the day, we all understand that life is hard enough as is. Why make it harder on your colleague, or particularly for yourself, in trying to report someone.
     
  25. Like
    RicardoKaká reacted to Meridian in U of T medical student convicted of rape   
    I assume you really meant that you like to see rapists get what they deserve.     Otherwise, why are you wishing to be a med student yourself ?
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