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SEAL

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  1. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from TalsKnight in 2019 CaRMS unfilled spots   
    Interesting conversation about IMG's.
    I am surprised that a lot of people on this thread think that the solution to the problem of CMG's going unmatched is to have more residency spots dedicated to CMG's at the expense of IMG spots. Fact is: there are as much residency spots for CMG's as there are graduates, so ideally everyone should be able to match. The problem is that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice, which is natural. If everyone were to become ophthalmologists, who would become family doctors? If everyone were to go to U of T, who is going to take care of patients across the rest of Canada? The fact that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice creates competition, which I personally view as something healthy rather than a problem that needs to be fixed. Unfortunately, with competition, some CMG's are bound to go unmatched.
    I think the first step to address the problem of CMG's going unmatched is by research. I am not sure if this is already happening or not, but the AFMC should start gathering data from CMG's who went unmatched to try to gain a deeper understanding of why they went unmatched. Personally, I can only think of 2 ways a CMG can go unmatched: either someone applying to a highly competitive speciality/location with zero backup or someone whose performance is so poor that a program would rather have their position unfilled than to rank him/her. In both cases, I don't think the solution is more spots.
    Now back to IMG's. There are 2 questions that I would like to address:
    1. Are CMG's necessarily better than IMG's? It is hard to tell. IMG's come from all over the world and you simply cannot paint everyone who trained outside of the US & Canada with the same brush. Moreover, there are a lot of factors that go into determining one's competency level besides location of training. One thing is for sure though, the chances of matching to residency as an IMG are so slim that only the best of the best are selected. On the other hand, you can find CMG's who actually match to residency yet still end up failing the QE1 exam, and, as I previously mentioned, there are CMG's whose performance is so poor that they end up being unmatched. So the idea that all CMG's are gods and all IMG's are crap is not true.
    2. Should CMG's be prioritized over IMG's when it comes to residency spots? In my opinion, yes, but not to the point where IMG's are excluded. It is important for CMG's to understand a couple of things about IMG's. First of all, IMG's are canadian citizens who have the same rights and responsibilities as any other canadian citizen (including the responsibility to pay taxes). You simply cannot have a CMG-only first iteration because that way you are completely excluding IMG's - who are canadian citizens - from certain specialties that typically have no leftover spots for the second iteration. You can't do that, you have to at least give IMG's the chance to compete.  The second thing that CMG's need to understand is that the Canadian healthcare system needs IMG's. According to recent statistics, 25% of the physician workforce in Canada are IMG's. Moreover, certain provinces rely heavily on IMG's e.g Saskatchewan where 53% of physicians are IMG's. And remember: there are as much CMG spots as grads, so IMG's are not really taking anything away from CMG's.
  2. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from vascular in 2019 CaRMS unfilled spots   
    Interesting conversation about IMG's.
    I am surprised that a lot of people on this thread think that the solution to the problem of CMG's going unmatched is to have more residency spots dedicated to CMG's at the expense of IMG spots. Fact is: there are as much residency spots for CMG's as there are graduates, so ideally everyone should be able to match. The problem is that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice, which is natural. If everyone were to become ophthalmologists, who would become family doctors? If everyone were to go to U of T, who is going to take care of patients across the rest of Canada? The fact that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice creates competition, which I personally view as something healthy rather than a problem that needs to be fixed. Unfortunately, with competition, some CMG's are bound to go unmatched.
    I think the first step to address the problem of CMG's going unmatched is by research. I am not sure if this is already happening or not, but the AFMC should start gathering data from CMG's who went unmatched to try to gain a deeper understanding of why they went unmatched. Personally, I can only think of 2 ways a CMG can go unmatched: either someone applying to a highly competitive speciality/location with zero backup or someone whose performance is so poor that a program would rather have their position unfilled than to rank him/her. In both cases, I don't think the solution is more spots.
    Now back to IMG's. There are 2 questions that I would like to address:
    1. Are CMG's necessarily better than IMG's? It is hard to tell. IMG's come from all over the world and you simply cannot paint everyone who trained outside of the US & Canada with the same brush. Moreover, there are a lot of factors that go into determining one's competency level besides location of training. One thing is for sure though, the chances of matching to residency as an IMG are so slim that only the best of the best are selected. On the other hand, you can find CMG's who actually match to residency yet still end up failing the QE1 exam, and, as I previously mentioned, there are CMG's whose performance is so poor that they end up being unmatched. So the idea that all CMG's are gods and all IMG's are crap is not true.
    2. Should CMG's be prioritized over IMG's when it comes to residency spots? In my opinion, yes, but not to the point where IMG's are excluded. It is important for CMG's to understand a couple of things about IMG's. First of all, IMG's are canadian citizens who have the same rights and responsibilities as any other canadian citizen (including the responsibility to pay taxes). You simply cannot have a CMG-only first iteration because that way you are completely excluding IMG's - who are canadian citizens - from certain specialties that typically have no leftover spots for the second iteration. You can't do that, you have to at least give IMG's the chance to compete.  The second thing that CMG's need to understand is that the Canadian healthcare system needs IMG's. According to recent statistics, 25% of the physician workforce in Canada are IMG's. Moreover, certain provinces rely heavily on IMG's e.g Saskatchewan where 53% of physicians are IMG's. And remember: there are as much CMG spots as grads, so IMG's are not really taking anything away from CMG's.
  3. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from Maggie19 in 2019 CaRMS unfilled spots   
    Interesting conversation about IMG's.
    I am surprised that a lot of people on this thread think that the solution to the problem of CMG's going unmatched is to have more residency spots dedicated to CMG's at the expense of IMG spots. Fact is: there are as much residency spots for CMG's as there are graduates, so ideally everyone should be able to match. The problem is that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice, which is natural. If everyone were to become ophthalmologists, who would become family doctors? If everyone were to go to U of T, who is going to take care of patients across the rest of Canada? The fact that there are not enough spots for everyone to match to their specialty/location of choice creates competition, which I personally view as something healthy rather than a problem that needs to be fixed. Unfortunately, with competition, some CMG's are bound to go unmatched.
    I think the first step to address the problem of CMG's going unmatched is by research. I am not sure if this is already happening or not, but the AFMC should start gathering data from CMG's who went unmatched to try to gain a deeper understanding of why they went unmatched. Personally, I can only think of 2 ways a CMG can go unmatched: either someone applying to a highly competitive speciality/location with zero backup or someone whose performance is so poor that a program would rather have their position unfilled than to rank him/her. In both cases, I don't think the solution is more spots.
    Now back to IMG's. There are 2 questions that I would like to address:
    1. Are CMG's necessarily better than IMG's? It is hard to tell. IMG's come from all over the world and you simply cannot paint everyone who trained outside of the US & Canada with the same brush. Moreover, there are a lot of factors that go into determining one's competency level besides location of training. One thing is for sure though, the chances of matching to residency as an IMG are so slim that only the best of the best are selected. On the other hand, you can find CMG's who actually match to residency yet still end up failing the QE1 exam, and, as I previously mentioned, there are CMG's whose performance is so poor that they end up being unmatched. So the idea that all CMG's are gods and all IMG's are crap is not true.
    2. Should CMG's be prioritized over IMG's when it comes to residency spots? In my opinion, yes, but not to the point where IMG's are excluded. It is important for CMG's to understand a couple of things about IMG's. First of all, IMG's are canadian citizens who have the same rights and responsibilities as any other canadian citizen (including the responsibility to pay taxes). You simply cannot have a CMG-only first iteration because that way you are completely excluding IMG's - who are canadian citizens - from certain specialties that typically have no leftover spots for the second iteration. You can't do that, you have to at least give IMG's the chance to compete.  The second thing that CMG's need to understand is that the Canadian healthcare system needs IMG's. According to recent statistics, 25% of the physician workforce in Canada are IMG's. Moreover, certain provinces rely heavily on IMG's e.g Saskatchewan where 53% of physicians are IMG's. And remember: there are as much CMG spots as grads, so IMG's are not really taking anything away from CMG's.
  4. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from Readyforthis2018 in What time do we need to submit by on Nov 1st   
    Deadline for MDCM document submission is 9 pm Montreal time.
    https://www.mcgill.ca/medadmissions/applying/submitting
  5. Thanks
    SEAL reacted to Eudaimonia in CV question.   
    My take is ECs are more structured, like as part of a group organization. Hobbies you tend to do on your own (could still be a group activity). 
    You can place that in either category. Don't worry no one will penalize you for putting it in the "wrong" place. 
  6. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from luciferase in Do we really care about patients ?   
    Another patient had all kinds of co-morbidities including Afib and was on warfarin. She had leukemia and needed to start chemo. Basically warfarin was the only anticoagulant that could work for her, all other anticoagulants were contraindicated. Problem is, once she stops eating and starts vomiting because of the chemo, her INR would be jumping up and down. No one wanted to make the call on that case. The oncologist (who is originally a hematologist) tossed the decision to the hematologist the patient was following as an outpatient, who tossed it to us, and we tossed it to pharmacy. As far as I remember, the patient's chemo was delayed for 2 weeks because no one wanted to make the decision. My rotation ended before I can figure out what happened.
  7. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from luciferase in Do we really care about patients ?   
    It's not just this incident  There are lots of other incidents. For example there was this patient with advanced myelofibrosis who was on an expiremental drug. For some reason his renal function was high (I can't remember why now) so the drug had to be stopped. Basically, this patient had lived a remarkable 13 years since diagnosis but now his heart was shutting down and his kidney was shutting down and his blood counts were dropping. The attending just saw him once and I was following him up for 2 weeks and his wife and son had all types of questions that I couldn't answer. One day I told my attending: maybe we should tell him that this is the end. My attending told me flatly: "I am not going to change his goals of care, just follow him up and transfuse as necessary". The next day I told his son to email the myelofibrosis specialist his father was seeing as an outpatient and demand to talk to him to find answers to his question. The next day, that doctor sent a fellow who was working with him who had a meeting with the patient and his family to tell them that he had just 3 months to live and there are no more treatment options and that he should go home and enjoy the rest of his short life.
  8. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from luciferase in Do we really care about patients ?   
    Do you think doctors really care about patients ?
    By caring I mean going out of one's way to help a patient. Something more than just diagnosis and treatment. 
    For example, I was doing a hematology/oncology rotation. And the team was composed of an attending, 4 residents and 1 med student. And we were having an extremely slow day. And then we got this new case where leukemia was suspected and the patient needed a bone marrow biopsy. The standard protocol was to fill out a referral form to the bone marrow clinic and the patient would be seen in 4 weeks.
    We were literally sitting all day long doing nothing except some short followups. No one said "hey ... this patient is probably worried about  the possibility of having cancer .... why don't we do a bone marrow right now and save her 4 weeks of sleepless nights "
    No. We just filled out a form and that's it.
    There are all types of situations where no one volunteers to go the extra mile for the patient's sake. If they don't absolutely have to do it, and if not doing it wouldn't compromise their liscence, they won't do it.
    This really begs the question about the point of having MMI interviews where there are scenarios that are supposed to test the applicant's compassion. Is it all just an act ?
  9. Like
    SEAL reacted to NLengr in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    None. Unfortunately, surgery of any kind generally has lots of stuff that can't wait. If you want a balanced resident life stay far far away from the OR. Maybe look into family, psych, path etc.
     
    Less terrible than average: ENT, Optho, Plastics
    Average levels of terrible: Urology, Cardiac (maybe, I haven't spent much time with them)
    Terrible: Gen Surg, Ortho, Vascular
    Ultra terrible: Neurosurg
     
    That's my own opinion based on my experience at my center. Don't take it for gospel.
  10. Like
    SEAL reacted to Fresh fry in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    Why do you think it is a coping mechanism, that is completely baseless? Could it not possibly be more in line with what NLegr has said where people who have actually gone through the system realize that as much as it sucks there is something necessary to it? Soldiers who go through basic training don't have a "good time" but every one of them that has been to war would wish that their training had been even harder. It is completely naive of a person who has no real idea of what they are rallying against to condemn the people that support it and to insult them by saying that they have no real concept of why they are supporting it, that is way out of line.
     
    I am applying to two surgical specialties that are probably #2 and #5 when it comes to hours worked (neurosurge is the worst hands down). I have a young family and the thought of being away from my kids and not being able to support my wife bothers me to no end. But I have actually walked the walk, I have done over 20 weeks of electives, spent nearly a year on 1 in 4 call during core rotations and I have a choice. I will probably chose one of the more "intense" programs specifically for the reason that in the specialties I am interested in, you need the hours to be competent. There is no stockholm syndrome, I have just seen the alternative and know that you need to do a 1000 assessments in the ER and you need to scrub in and retract on 1000 cases to see the anatomy to know what you are looking at and not chop up ureters, you need to sew with double gloves on a million times, etc. 
     
    I want to get through that as fast as possible. As for resident "well-being", people have choices as to where they want to go; democracy is forcing programs to get better everyday to attract the best candidates. Schools have implemented night floats, afternoon naps, mandatory protected home time. There are many examples of toxic programs that are slow to catch on and I'm glad there are people who are pushing to correct this but the fact of the matter is residency sucks regardless; it is the same as a marathon or climbing a mountain. You can do things to make it suck less but it is hell while you are going through it; the trick with both is to get it over with as fast as possible. The bigger the mountain the greater the challenge and the greater the suck. 
     
    Here is the thing: when you get on to the ward in a couple years, and you are on overnight call for the first time in your life, and you are tired because you have been up all night admitting some COPD'er for the 13th time this month you are going to think back on this and think "I was right, why don't we have night float" or "what is the point of this, this is scut I'm not learning anything". But then your next page will be a for a coding patient or someone who is really sick and having chest pains and you are going to wish you had seen this a hundred times before. You are going to feel scared and inadequate and when that person dies, even if it is through no fault of your own, you are going to feel worse than you have ever felt before. You are going to start staying late after you could go home to see more cases, you are going to study harder than you have ever before. That's not stockholm syndrome, that is the drive to be the best, the sense of commitment and professionalism that has brought us all this far. This is a serious game with the most serious of stakes; maybe your attitude will change once you have played it, I'm sure you won't be so quick to condemn those who have.
  11. Like
    SEAL reacted to xkittens in Is It Possible To Finish Med School Without Becoming Too Salty Or Cynical?   
    Lol I entered medical school cynical and salty, figured it'd inevitably happen and I might as well save myself the heartache of transitioning. 
  12. Like
    SEAL reacted to AGlamar in Are We Split Into Different Med Campuses?   
    I was wondering if students at mcgill med are split into different groups and have to take classes at different places. If this is the case, do you get to choose where you want to go? Are different sites considered better than others? During 3rd and 4th year, do you get to choose where you want to do your rotations? I was reading some of the information on the probation letter and Gatineau Campus kept on coming up. Is it mandatory to do rotations there?
  13. Like
    SEAL reacted to Hoowin in MCCQE Part 1   
  14. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from BeeDoc in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    I don't get it ........... your friend repeated med school twice ? 
     
    One in the UK & and one in the US ?
  15. Like
    SEAL reacted to Edict in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    Yeah I have to agree that for those who find their passion for medicine in undergrad, it helps, but for all those people who do a life sci degree only to not make it into professional school it often means they end up doing a degree they never wanted to do in the first place over an alternative they would have preferred or would have made them more employable. 
     
    Plenty of life scis might have preferred a degree in engineering or business but because GPA's are harder in those majors they chose life sci. If they don't get into medical school which lets be honest with ourselves is a lot of them that is wasted talent. People who would have been amazing engineers are now left 4 years later with a degree that doesn't let them get a good engineering job. 
     
    Too often do I hear people going into life sci because they don't know what they want to do or want professional school but have no concrete plan to make it through that competition. Only in Canada do you see the numbers entering life sci over 1000 at most schools each year. In the UK, the equivalent which is biology, biochem etc often have maybe 50-200 students entering each year. 
     
    No one is saying removing the graduate entry medicine completely, but more direct from high school entry seems to make more sense in my opinion.  
     
    In the UK medical school is less intensive as they spread out the information over 6 years rather than 3 or 4. That in my opinion reduces the burden and the stress levels on students. 6 years of medium intensive study in my opinion beats 4 years of intensive UG study just to achieve GPA and 4 years of intensive medical school. 
     
    Also, we shouldn't fool ourselves into thinking people in life sci really love life sci as a career. The profs will tell you first hand this as well, most life scis want medicine or dentistry or some professional school. A minority actually are interested in basic science research, life sci profs might be able to have more dedicated and interested students if fewer people studied life sciences as a means to medical school and more studied it because of actual interest. 
  16. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from Bambi in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    Anyways ........ I am having a hard time believing that an Oxford grad is somehow less qualified than a Toronto grad.
     
    If anything, their system is better ...... students spend 6 years studying medicine + 1 year internship ...... here everything is crammed into 4 years and you have to decide which specialty you are going to practice in a much shorter time and limited exposure ......... because you wasted 4 years of your life that could have been better spent in actual medical school.
     
    TBH, I really don't see the point of undergrad if a person really knows he wants to be a doctor. 
     
    Thus, I think it should be dropped as a requirement ....... it should be optional.
     
    I bet if the rules changed you would see people gunning for medical school from high school or even before that .... knowing that if they worked hard enough to prove to the adcom that they are fit and ready ...... they would be saving 4 years of their lives ...... and nobody would be working hard for something they are not 100% sure about.
     
    And I also think we need the internship year back ...... more practice ........more exposure ..... more time.
     
    At the end of the day .......... it is not about actually shortening the number of years required to become a doctor ........ it's about making time for what is important (med school) and cutting time from what is not (undergrad) ......... just to make the system more efficient.
     
    The CEGEP system is a good model ....... QuRMS is also good.
     
    I think more provinces need to adopt similar pathways in order to allow exceptional candidates to follow an accelerated route to med school ........ the ultimate goal.
     
    Some people can achieve at age 20 what others achieve at age 30 ........ everyones has their own pace ........ and the system needs to be changed to embrace those differences.  
     
    Just my opinion.
  17. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from Edict in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    I think the cut should be made to undergrad .......... med schools should drop the undergrad degree requirement and allow competitive applicants to apply directly from high school.
     
    If it still becomes the norm to get into med school after finishing undergrad then so be it but it shouldn't be a requirement.
     
    I am not a big fan of the maturity theory. Maturity is variable and doesn't necessarily increase with age.
     
    What about high school grads who go join the army ? Should they be considered too immature to be protecting a whole country ?
     
    Some people are just ready.
  18. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from LittleDaisy in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    The youngest doctor in the world is actually a palestenian named Igbal El Assad ........ she became a resident in the US at only 20 years old !
     
    A resident ........ in the US ......... at 20 years old !!!
     
    Look her up !!!
     
    If you are smart enough to diagnose and treat a patient ..... then go ahead ....... what's the big deal ?
  19. Like
    SEAL got a reaction from LittleDaisy in How To Shorten The Pathway Of Becoming A Doctor In Canada   
    I think the cut should be made to undergrad .......... med schools should drop the undergrad degree requirement and allow competitive applicants to apply directly from high school.
     
    If it still becomes the norm to get into med school after finishing undergrad then so be it but it shouldn't be a requirement.
     
    I am not a big fan of the maturity theory. Maturity is variable and doesn't necessarily increase with age.
     
    What about high school grads who go join the army ? Should they be considered too immature to be protecting a whole country ?
     
    Some people are just ready.
  20. Like
    SEAL reacted to thatonekid in Does It Look Bad To Do Most Of Your Electives In One Specialty?   
    Basically to shorten training time and increase the number of family doctors faster. Here's an opinion piece you may be interested in: http://healthydebate.ca/opinions/should-we-embrace-a-return-of-the-rotating-internship
     
    I also want to say that, for competitive specialties, it's not too late if you decide on them during clerkship, Yes, it will be harder to match and you'll have to do more work to make yourself into a competitive applicant, but it happens to people every year.
  21. Like
    SEAL reacted to bruhh in Mcgill Med Program Put On Probation?   
    I believe Ottawa is, but they only have a few problems to address - not "two dozens"!. 
    EDIT: http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/u-of-o-receives-notice-of-intent-to-withdraw-accreditation-of-neurosurgery-program
     
    So just the neurosurgery residency program is on probation
  22. Like
    SEAL reacted to Vanguard in Annual Specialty Competitiveness Stats   
    I have updated the stats for the 2015 year! File uploaded to original Dropbox Link.
    Top 3 most competitive specialties for 2015: 1) Dermatology 2) Plastics 3) Emergency.  Same 3 as 2014 but different order.
  23. Like
    SEAL reacted to rogerroger in Question To U Of T Med Students About Toronto Notes   
    It's trash, and I say that as a former chapter editor who now is a couple years out from the final exam. The book is basically created by dozens upon dozens of med students mining information off the internet from random sources.
     
    Do yourself a service and don't start using that book. It does not reflect the content of the LMCC exam. Nor, is is very correct. If you use it, then ween yourself off it. 
     
    You can thank me later.
  24. Like
    SEAL reacted to RiceWine in Best Resources For Mcq   
    what he/she said
  25. Like
    SEAL reacted to shikimate in Best Resources For Mcq   
    UWorld hands down. After >2200 MCQ you'll be a master it
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