Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

AncientDentist

Members
  • Content Count

    176
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from toothurty in For those struggling with rejection, concerns, or quarantine   
    Thanks so much for doing this! So important to get through these tough times together. Wishing you all the best. Too bad admissions look at flaunted achievements rather than those acts of goodness that some people do discretely. You will one day make an amazing clinician (if that's the path you choose).
    PM me if I could be any resource at all to you or anyone else.
    All the best
  2. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Fentist in For those struggling with rejection, concerns, or quarantine   
    Thanks so much for doing this! So important to get through these tough times together. Wishing you all the best. Too bad admissions look at flaunted achievements rather than those acts of goodness that some people do discretely. You will one day make an amazing clinician (if that's the path you choose).
    PM me if I could be any resource at all to you or anyone else.
    All the best
  3. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Crockus in For those struggling with rejection, concerns, or quarantine   
    Thanks so much for doing this! So important to get through these tough times together. Wishing you all the best. Too bad admissions look at flaunted achievements rather than those acts of goodness that some people do discretely. You will one day make an amazing clinician (if that's the path you choose).
    PM me if I could be any resource at all to you or anyone else.
    All the best
  4. Like
    AncientDentist reacted to ashleyfaviana in Dental schools and Covid   
    Thoughts on whats happening to dental schools come fall?
     
  5. Like
    AncientDentist reacted to Allone in For those struggling with rejection, concerns, or quarantine   
    Hello everyone! I can only imagine how differently difficult this pandemics is for everyone. Having perceived the type of impacts this quarantine can have on mental health, and how many of us simply need someone to talk to (especially after receiving rejections) , I made a page called Allone where I answer any questions, converse, or keep company for those who feel isolated, alone, or however else you may be feeling. The facebook page is:
    https://www.facebook.com/Allone-111909780529377/?modal=admin_todo_tour
    This page is ran solely by myself, and everything is confidential and could be anonymous if you wish it to be. I am NOT a professional, but I am open to discuss about any topic. Cheers, everyone!

    I, as well, was faced with rejections this cycle but I found connecting with others tremendously helpful.
  6. Like
    AncientDentist reacted to Zaandrei. in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    Federal tax credits for education was taken off the table back in 2017; provincial is separate. Just in case people didn't know; it was annoying that they couldn't wait until i finished my schooling
    Also keep in mind the marginal tax calculation not using the highest bracket to assume you'll get taxed at the highest bracket. See below for Ontario (add these to federal). The effective tax rate for someone earning around $140k is about 32% before any deductions.
      5.05% on the first $44,740 of taxable income, +
    9.15% on the next $44,742, +
    11.16% on the next $60,518, +
    12.16% on the next $70,000, +
    13.16 % on the amount over $220,000
    Sources:
    https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-32300-your-tuition-education-textbook-amounts.html
    https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/frequently-asked-questions-individuals/canadian-income-tax-rates-individuals-current-previous-years.html#provincial
     
    Just in case people wanted a bit of information; seemed as though a lot of my colleagues had no idea what the difference is between effective (or average) tax rate vs the marginal tax rate.
  7. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from nfmp13 in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    To add on to what Zaandrei said, and I think I've mentioned my perspective on this in a different thread, but LOC should honestly be the least of your worries. The interest on your LOC is actually comparable to some mortgage rates, and you see people take out sizable mortgages of upwards of 700k these days in Toronto and often they're making nowhere near a dentist's salary. It's all about your priorities and how you choose to budget your income after you graduate. You often see people post about how long it is gonna take them to pay off their debt and making statements like "for 10 years you'll be living off a nurse's salary because of your LOC payments, etc." I honestly could not agree less with this perspective. If you choose to rigorously pay off your debt, it's because YOU'VE prioritized paying off your debt over other things you could have chosen to spend your money on. Let's say for the sake of argument you're paying 15k interest on your debt per year and you choose to never pay down the principal (not something I advise, but for the sake of argument). Meanwhile however, you're putting your extra money into CE, a home or practice purchase, other investments, you name it. You may see the return on your investment is much greater than the 15k your throwing at the bank. No one's situation or priorities are equal however, you may be the type of person who hates debt and wants to retire at 40, so you decide to live frugally and pay off your debt in a few years and focus on retirement savings. You may one day own 15 clinics and look  back at your 300k debt as trivial. Heck, I know a dentist who spent another 100k after dental school on an MBA and I know he isn't hurting at all for money.
    Obviously living financially responsibly is a skill you want to maintain through dental school and the rest of your life, but in my opinion, if dentistry is what you're choosing to do, commit yourself fully to it and don't give the debt a second thought.
  8. Like
    AncientDentist reacted to toothurty in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    Completely agree with this perspective. We're lucky to be going to school in Canada. I feel bad for the American students in the states paying 300-500k usd for dental school with federal loans at 7-8% with who knows how much undergrad debt and then going to work 9-5 at a corp ... 
  9. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Panerai in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    To add on to what Zaandrei said, and I think I've mentioned my perspective on this in a different thread, but LOC should honestly be the least of your worries. The interest on your LOC is actually comparable to some mortgage rates, and you see people take out sizable mortgages of upwards of 700k these days in Toronto and often they're making nowhere near a dentist's salary. It's all about your priorities and how you choose to budget your income after you graduate. You often see people post about how long it is gonna take them to pay off their debt and making statements like "for 10 years you'll be living off a nurse's salary because of your LOC payments, etc." I honestly could not agree less with this perspective. If you choose to rigorously pay off your debt, it's because YOU'VE prioritized paying off your debt over other things you could have chosen to spend your money on. Let's say for the sake of argument you're paying 15k interest on your debt per year and you choose to never pay down the principal (not something I advise, but for the sake of argument). Meanwhile however, you're putting your extra money into CE, a home or practice purchase, other investments, you name it. You may see the return on your investment is much greater than the 15k your throwing at the bank. No one's situation or priorities are equal however, you may be the type of person who hates debt and wants to retire at 40, so you decide to live frugally and pay off your debt in a few years and focus on retirement savings. You may one day own 15 clinics and look  back at your 300k debt as trivial. Heck, I know a dentist who spent another 100k after dental school on an MBA and I know he isn't hurting at all for money.
    Obviously living financially responsibly is a skill you want to maintain through dental school and the rest of your life, but in my opinion, if dentistry is what you're choosing to do, commit yourself fully to it and don't give the debt a second thought.
  10. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from toothurty in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    To add on to what Zaandrei said, and I think I've mentioned my perspective on this in a different thread, but LOC should honestly be the least of your worries. The interest on your LOC is actually comparable to some mortgage rates, and you see people take out sizable mortgages of upwards of 700k these days in Toronto and often they're making nowhere near a dentist's salary. It's all about your priorities and how you choose to budget your income after you graduate. You often see people post about how long it is gonna take them to pay off their debt and making statements like "for 10 years you'll be living off a nurse's salary because of your LOC payments, etc." I honestly could not agree less with this perspective. If you choose to rigorously pay off your debt, it's because YOU'VE prioritized paying off your debt over other things you could have chosen to spend your money on. Let's say for the sake of argument you're paying 15k interest on your debt per year and you choose to never pay down the principal (not something I advise, but for the sake of argument). Meanwhile however, you're putting your extra money into CE, a home or practice purchase, other investments, you name it. You may see the return on your investment is much greater than the 15k your throwing at the bank. No one's situation or priorities are equal however, you may be the type of person who hates debt and wants to retire at 40, so you decide to live frugally and pay off your debt in a few years and focus on retirement savings. You may one day own 15 clinics and look  back at your 300k debt as trivial. Heck, I know a dentist who spent another 100k after dental school on an MBA and I know he isn't hurting at all for money.
    Obviously living financially responsibly is a skill you want to maintain through dental school and the rest of your life, but in my opinion, if dentistry is what you're choosing to do, commit yourself fully to it and don't give the debt a second thought.
  11. Like
    AncientDentist reacted to Zaandrei. in Minimizing and Paying off School Debt   
    There's many things to consider depending on if you're a US citizen or Canadian.

    So for Canadians it's a lot more straightforward. Get an LOC, use it as you wish. Apply for OSAP, milk them as much as you can for that free money and free loans; then pay is all back after the grace period after graduation - the interest on the LOC is lower than OSAP by a landslide. Try to keep it reasonable. max limit is about 375k, don't get near it if you can help it; don't be a big spender during school. Enjoy your time off, don't go working, not worth it like someone else mentioned.

    During dental school, get a financial advisor/insurance broker, typically they can do it all: find you a job, get disability isurance, help you with your resumes, retirement savings, buying a practice... anything. You get a bunch of this in 3rd/4th year as they start hunting you down. They can usually point you in the right direction, what to focus on, what to pay off first, where to find a job, how to invest, retirement planning etc. Paying off your LOC is actually fairly low priority since its low interest rate. I don't believe you have to 'keep costs at an all time low' after you're done school. Interest on 200k-300k loan is about $700-1200 a month right now. If you're on the bottom end of a dentist's wages at about 100k/year, there's still plenty of headroom. No need to worry about your LOC during school at all, and not even much after finishing school. Focus on school while you're in it; just don't go buying a brand new Audi RS7. I'm a AEGD resident in the US right now and I'm strolling around just fine with an income of about 50k USD/year; that's covering my interest and some of my principal as well. I'm certainty not eating out every night of the week, but also not eating boxed noodles for dinner every night (not meant to be offensive at all; eat what you like!).
    Working in the northern part of Ontario is known to be very, very lucrative for new graduating dentists; some of our classmates do that for a 1-2 years and make a killing doing that; heard of people paying off their loans in 2 years doing it. Everyone's different. But also don't work yourself to death. Breathe a little, life is short.
  12. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from NWL@UWO in Applying for Med School and Dental school in same cycle   
    Classmate of mine actually left dentistry for med after 1st year, so they must really not care...
  13. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from milktea in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  14. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from DentKoolKid in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  15. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from ace777 in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  16. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Ms. Chip Skylark in Decision between U of T vs. UWO Dentistry?   
    Hey!
    Obviously it's hard to offer a complete perspective unless someone has gone to both schools, but I can do my best as a current 4th yr at western.
    For me the biggest aspect of the decision was finances. In London I got an apartment for 1k per month (all-included) which was spacious for my wife and I, and within walking distance of school. Other than that, I personally knew that I would hate the hustle and bustle of Toronto, and I'm not really too social, so that whole nightlife thing wasn't that appealing to me. Keep in mind, you'll probably form really close bonds and friendships with your classmates and even a small city won't feel too boring when you're keeping busy with schools and social gatherings with your classmates.
    Clinically, I can tell you for a fact that you will not graduate from ANY school feeling totally competent to practice. Toronto and Western are probably pretty comparable in terms of clinical experience, but I would say that Australian and US grads likely have much better clinical experience than their Canadian counterparts. I wouldn't use clinical as a deciding factor, you will find your fair share of issues and frustrating experiences whether you go to Western or Toronto. There is definitely some kind of systemic problem at Western for example that has to do with distribution of resources and access to patients, but they have been making tremendous strides towards equalizing everything - for example, this year they moved from a random lottery of cubicle assignment to a balanced assignment of cubicles to all students. 
    One thing is that Western does allow its students to do molar endo (root canals for molar teeth) because they don't have an endo specialty program, but I've heard that Toronto excels in other clinical disciplines as well, so this is something to keep in mind but shouldn't be a huge deciding factor.
    I honestly don't think there's any benefit in terms of access to jobs for either school. If you plan to work in Toronto or London, it may be beneficial to consider studying there so that it's easier to apply/shadow prospective jobs, but again this isn't too big of a factor. I don't plan to work in either city, and I haven't found that clinics expressed a preference for one school over the other. It was really down to personality and if you click with the principal dentist at the clinic.
    There's a lot more to say, but let me know if there's another specific question you have, and I'll do my best to answer.
    Goodluck!
  17. Haha
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Censored in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  18. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from HopefulDDS in What are the graduation requirements for various dental schools in Canada?   
    I'm (hopefully) graduating from UWO this year and I can only speak for our curriculum:
    100 operative surfaces
    5 endos (1 upper molar, 1 lower molar, 1 upper premolar, 1 lower premolar, 1 anterior tooth)
    5 removable prosth arches (3 complete dentures, 1 cast partial, 1 transitional partial) - this one is very variable
    4 units of fixed prosth (i.e. crowns - bridges count but not everyone gets a bridge case)
    4 cases of periodontal disease (treatment planning, scaling, re-assessment)
    4 pediatric treatments (stainless steel crowns, extractions, fillings)
    Other softer requirements like nightguards, denture repairs, etc.
    No strict oral surgery requirements but I feel like everyone gets a decent share of simple and surgical extractions, some people have done frenectomies, alveoplasty, biopsies, etc.
    Overall, students are not happy about the amount of clinical exposure they get, but I wouldn't worry too much about it. Most people feel decently prepared to go out and practice. We may not be as fast or efficient as we could be, but we were taught well how to treatment plan and what is or isn't clinically acceptable. That is the most important thing, and speed and efficiency will come with time. 
  19. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from ItsAMiga in What are the graduation requirements for various dental schools in Canada?   
    I'm (hopefully) graduating from UWO this year and I can only speak for our curriculum:
    100 operative surfaces
    5 endos (1 upper molar, 1 lower molar, 1 upper premolar, 1 lower premolar, 1 anterior tooth)
    5 removable prosth arches (3 complete dentures, 1 cast partial, 1 transitional partial) - this one is very variable
    4 units of fixed prosth (i.e. crowns - bridges count but not everyone gets a bridge case)
    4 cases of periodontal disease (treatment planning, scaling, re-assessment)
    4 pediatric treatments (stainless steel crowns, extractions, fillings)
    Other softer requirements like nightguards, denture repairs, etc.
    No strict oral surgery requirements but I feel like everyone gets a decent share of simple and surgical extractions, some people have done frenectomies, alveoplasty, biopsies, etc.
    Overall, students are not happy about the amount of clinical exposure they get, but I wouldn't worry too much about it. Most people feel decently prepared to go out and practice. We may not be as fast or efficient as we could be, but we were taught well how to treatment plan and what is or isn't clinically acceptable. That is the most important thing, and speed and efficiency will come with time. 
  20. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from nfmp13 in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  21. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from toothurty in Decision between U of T vs. UWO Dentistry?   
    Hey!
    Obviously it's hard to offer a complete perspective unless someone has gone to both schools, but I can do my best as a current 4th yr at western.
    For me the biggest aspect of the decision was finances. In London I got an apartment for 1k per month (all-included) which was spacious for my wife and I, and within walking distance of school. Other than that, I personally knew that I would hate the hustle and bustle of Toronto, and I'm not really too social, so that whole nightlife thing wasn't that appealing to me. Keep in mind, you'll probably form really close bonds and friendships with your classmates and even a small city won't feel too boring when you're keeping busy with schools and social gatherings with your classmates.
    Clinically, I can tell you for a fact that you will not graduate from ANY school feeling totally competent to practice. Toronto and Western are probably pretty comparable in terms of clinical experience, but I would say that Australian and US grads likely have much better clinical experience than their Canadian counterparts. I wouldn't use clinical as a deciding factor, you will find your fair share of issues and frustrating experiences whether you go to Western or Toronto. There is definitely some kind of systemic problem at Western for example that has to do with distribution of resources and access to patients, but they have been making tremendous strides towards equalizing everything - for example, this year they moved from a random lottery of cubicle assignment to a balanced assignment of cubicles to all students. 
    One thing is that Western does allow its students to do molar endo (root canals for molar teeth) because they don't have an endo specialty program, but I've heard that Toronto excels in other clinical disciplines as well, so this is something to keep in mind but shouldn't be a huge deciding factor.
    I honestly don't think there's any benefit in terms of access to jobs for either school. If you plan to work in Toronto or London, it may be beneficial to consider studying there so that it's easier to apply/shadow prospective jobs, but again this isn't too big of a factor. I don't plan to work in either city, and I haven't found that clinics expressed a preference for one school over the other. It was really down to personality and if you click with the principal dentist at the clinic.
    There's a lot more to say, but let me know if there's another specific question you have, and I'll do my best to answer.
    Goodluck!
  22. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from toothurty in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  23. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from HopefulDDS in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  24. Like
    AncientDentist got a reaction from Maggie19 in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Currently looking for associateship position and this thread was a very depressing read LOL.
    Quick comment about finances: people constantly give examples of "your income will be ___ if you try to pay off your debt in 10 years, which is basically the income of a teacher/nurse/etc." Is this perspective actually accurate? Excluding OSAP,  there is absolutely no pressure to pay off your debt - the bank LOC does not convert into a loan, and all you're forced to pay is the monthly interest (which for me is currently about 750 dollars a month on a 230k debt). In fact, very few other careers offer (potentially) lifelong access to a 350k LOC - of course this should be handled extremely responsibly but its still a beneficial thing to have. Others have also not considered the small (but still relevant) effect that tuition credits will have on helping you make a bit of a dent in your loans early out of school. Dentistry is an opportunity to make a higher income and it's honestly up to the individual to decide what they'd like to do with their earnings. A fixed 80k/year salary is not the same as a 150k salary where you can choose to pay off your debt (or not). It's like being offered an 800k mortgage by a bank - it's a blessing to have this option, though you may choose to rent instead. Not everyone is presented with this option or this choice.
    From how I look at it, dentistry is not a golden ticket with a guaranteed 6-figure salary and comfortable lifestyle. Nothing in life gives that kind of guarantee. And personally, I don't feel entitled because I'm a graduating dentist - I don't deserve a specific income and lifestyle. I am fortunate to have grown up in a country which has offered me the opportunity to become a dentist and a line of work which is rewarding and challenging. I am also fortunate that I have the option to do any and all of the things which were mentioned in this thread - I could move to the US, work up north or in Alberta or Saskatchewan, go abroad and help people, own 20 clinics or none, work 3 days a week or 7, I can make make bad or good financial decisions. I have OPTIONS - it's up to me what I do with them. I grew up in a poor immigrant family and I don't think people realize that having these options and opportunities is a blessing in and of itself. People are speaking about working at McDonalds... you have the opportunity to choose between being a Dentist and a McDonald employee, I would hazard to guess that a lot of McDonald employees do not have a similar choice.
    I realize that I speaking from a place of doey-eyed optimism and that I haven't experienced the (probably very difficult) realities of the real world. Take what I say with a grain of salt.
  25. Haha
    AncientDentist reacted to KentuckyFriedBlaziken in The slow decay of dentistry   
    Brazil already taken over the leadership at a certain school, without Canadian licenses even
×
×
  • Create New...