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Books

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Books last won the day on May 22 2015

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  1. To be perfectly honest, I picked my school based on its location (it was really, really important to me to be close to family). I was very lucky that it is a great school, and well suited to my learning style. I think it's useful to consider the schedule when picking a school. I'm extremely grateful that my school mostly gives us afternoons off so that we can focus on studying or doing electives or anything else we want. I've realized in hindsight that a school like U of T, where classes are typically something like 9-5, would not have been for me (although I hear they're re-vamping their program for 2T0). I also think you should try to find something that matches your learning style. You should also consider the city the school is in, and whether it's close to family/friends/significant other if that's important to you.
  2. All medical schools in Canada are pretty good. They each have their strengths and their weaknesses, but the training will be similar wherever you go. You might never get accepted anywhere else, so if you get an acceptance, you should go for it - hundreds of people would want nothing more than to be in your shoes!
  3. I don't know what it's like for all schools, but I know someone who got accepted off the waitlist at Western in July (I believe) and had to give Western an answer in less than 48 hours. He had to decline because he couldn't be sure his grad program would be wrapped up in time. I'd check with the individual schools though.
  4. It really depends on your school. I know that people who studied science at University of Ottawa are awarded a general science BSc degree.
  5. Like the others have said before me : we won't really be able to tell you anything because we weren't there. But I know posters and presentations can be nerve-racking, and that's probably why you'd love to get feedback on your performance... Maybe you could ask a friend or professor you know well and ask them what they think of your poster presentation?
  6. I'm an MS1 and I find that I'm still having a hard time finding a study method that works well for me. I'm just wondering how everyone else is studying (specifically) in med school? Any tips? Thank you!
  7. I haven't looked into U of S particularly, but for most schools, you need to make a certain GPA cut off before you are even considered for an interview. I think that GPA probably accounts for more than 25% of your application pre-interview and plays a huge factor in whether or not you actually get an interview. I think you should absolutely do engineering if that's what would make you happy, but I just thought that you might want to consider this whole pre- vs. post-interview score thing if you haven't already. Best of luck!
  8. I would call the schools you're applying to specifically. I do personally know someone who had to refuse med school admission at Western the year because he got accepted off the wait list and couldn't finish his Masters before the end of August. Western apparently shows no flexibility with this and I heard other schools were following suit.
  9. I would take two semesters of physics if I were you. I only took the old 2014 MCAT, but unless it changed significantly, taking two physics classes will be infinitely more useful than taking calculus.
  10. I did coop and included the terms I did as research (I did two in R&D at a private company, one in an academic lab and one in a governmental organization lab). No one complained to me about it, and I got admitted into med school. So I would say go for it! I definitely think it counts. Besides, coop was an amazing experience for me and lots of other people I know; I would absolutely recommend it!
  11. As suggested above I would make sure to carefully read each school's requirements. I personally used three former employers (one of which had also been my prof). Looking back, it probably would have been best to diversify, although the jobs I had were very different and so spoke to the diverse experiences I had. I still got in though, so I guess it must have been all right. I mostly selected people I knew would give me stellar references and whom I knew cared about me and my future endeavors.
  12. Books

    Martial Arts

    I'm a taekwondo red belt and I've been training since 2008-2009. I've had a bit of a hard time attending class twice a week during my undergrad. I usually ended up attending maybe once a week only, unfortunately. I'm hoping I'll be more disciplined this year (although I don't know why in the world I'd have more time now that I'm starting med school... maybe I'm being overly optimistic )
  13. I drove across the border to write the MCAT in Watertown last year. I don't know where you are in Ontario, but if you can find a spot in the US that's not too far from the border, that might be doable for you as well.
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