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OwnerOfTheTARDIS

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  1. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to Coldery in A flawed process?   
    If you talking strictly on the basis of commitment to this single volunteer group, understand too that people have their own lives and obligations. They may have other commitment(s) where they are already demonstrating the effort that you speak of for those that weren't interviewed or accepted.
    If you are talking about a situation where they demonstrate an outright lack of care or negligence then that would be different. Otherwise, you'd have to get the full view before coming to a conclusion. 
  2. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from Opichi in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  3. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from marblestatue in Anyone ONLY being considered for NMP?   
    No, it means that their scores are ineligible for admission to a ‘regular’ seat. The committee that oversees rural admissions can basically do whatever they want, so if someone has an amazing rural application but their scores are just below the regular cutoff, the committee can choose to interview them anyway.
    Even if you didn’t get an email, you’re still hypothetically in the running for an NMP seat, if that’s what you want.
    My hypothesis (unconfirmed) is that it is their method of filling the NMP with good quality rural candidates, since NMP is by far the least popular site and the rural seats in SMP and IMP are pretty easy to fill.
  4. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I would agree that at the beginning of the year especially people go a bit overboard with partying, but it tapers down quite a bit after the first month (or maybe I just stopped going out, who knows). At the same time, there are lots of people who don't drink in our class and still attend events and have fun, and I haven't seen any judgement from others around drinking or not (both ways). 
    I think it can be difficult to come up with group activities once the weather turns, so it's easy to fall back on eating out, but yes that can get pricey after a while. Many groups who weren't outdoors-oriented did seasonal activities (UBC Farm apple festival, Halloween train in Stanley Park, Holiday festivals around christmas), or organized potlucks, games nights, sports watching events, etc. If you hear of anything going on, just ask to join! 
    I would also heavily encourage people to get involved with activity-related clubs - this year we started a culinary club to cook food, the Bhangra club is always amazing, and there's also games clubs, sports teams, choir, band, art, and other things so you should hopefully be able to find a group that you can meet some like-minded people in to do things that aren't related to med at all. 
  5. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to frenchpress in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I second this as a useful study strategy, particularly as you get further along. First semester everything is super new and it’s a new topic every week, so CBL can be overwhelming some times. But over the course of the first two years I spent less and less time on lectures, and more time focused on reading around the CBL cases, and I found it really helped my grades and my own ability to remember stuff long term.
  6. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    Sounds about right! Only change is that the spring FoS exam is during the finals season now (the last exam of year 1!) 
    I'm opposite to you in that I tried not going to lecture but just found myself getting further and further behind, also disengaged with the system! I like going to class partly as a social activity (don't discount that), and also to force myself into learning, but I would add that you need to come up with an active lecture plan so that you stay engaged (i.e. do not just passively listen/copy notes!) I found that trying to summarize information and come up with questions as the lecture goes on kept me engaged and helped with remembering things later on, but try some systems to see what works for you. 
    Also +1 on setting aside a weekend day/days to not do school. A weekend, weekend day, or weekday evening isn't going to make or break your career, so let yourself live in addition to being a student.
    Another thing I just thought of - it's easy to get by in cbl without doing anything, or by doing the bare minimum of prep (I know many who do this and have definitely done it myself some weeks). That being said, if you spend cbl prep time really understanding the physiology, background, and big concepts of the week, you'll not only be prepared for cbl, but it will really make things better to understand. I found that the weeks I was most engaged with cbl were the weeks I did best on in exams. This is especially true if the week is disorganized or not in your realm of interest.  
  7. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I really think this depends on your personality! For me, I found school much less stressful than undergrad/masters, but I tend to have a more relaxed person when it comes to knowing all the things, versus understanding what will be important for future practice. That being said, there are others in the class who seemed to be in a constant state of stress, because the amount of material thrown at you each day is ridiculous sometimes, so realistically, I think the stress will likely be whatever you allow it to be. Sorry if that's a non-committal answer but it's hard to speak for 300 people's mental state lol 
    The best advice around studying I can give you is to come up with a system for reviewing material throughout the week and understanding big concepts and physiology. If you get bogged down with the details it's going to drive you crazy (and always keep in mind that there's only ~2 questions on the midterm/final per lecture so if there's one lecture that is just completely over your head it's ok!). Try not to get behind on weeks, because it does add stress to the finals period, and if you can keep up with lab/histo you're going to thank yourself during the finals week (I did not do this and fully regret it). I was inconsistent with studying, some weeks a lot, some not at all, but I felt the best about my work/life balance when I spent ~1-2 hours each night reviewing the lectures from that day (M/W/F), and then did cbl and clin skills things in addition to that. 
  8. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from casajayo in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  9. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from DoctorArts in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  10. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from bluewhale in MS1 happy to answer questions   
    I hope it's ok if I hop on @casajayo's post.
    Each week is CBL Monday Wednesday Friday from 8-10. Lectures M, W, F morning. FoS on M afternoon (until it becomes FLEX in spring). Either lecture or lab W/F afternoons. Either clinical skills or family practice T/Th afternoons (half the class will have FP on Tuesday with clin skills on Th and half the class will be the opposite). T/Th mornings are generally free for personal/study time, but sometimes there are interprofessional or indigenous cultural sensitivity sessions during that time. After a long weekend, they almost always make you come in on Tuesday morning.
    The topic of the week is fairly random - you can go from pregnancy to immunology to GI, but sometimes you'll get 2 or 3 weeks in a row on a related topic. CBL scenarios are specific to the week theme. I honestly think the most challenging part of med school is self-motivating. It is generally easy to pass - you only need a cumulative 60% on exams (only ~5 people fail each semester and have to do a make up exam) - but now that I'm heading into clerkship, I'm brushing up on a lot of stuff I breezed over in year 1. 
    My studying approach has also changed a lot - I used to go to every lecture and now I hardly ever go. A lot of lectures are recorded, but even if they are not, the slides are posted and I could study way more efficiently from just slides or watching recordings on 1.6x speed. It helped me stay focused (I get so bored/distracted at regular lecture speed) and I was more efficient so I didn't need to study at all outside normal school hours and only ~ 3-4 hours on the weekend, depending on how close to exams we were. I personally recommend setting aside either Saturday or Sunday to be a school-free day. It's easy to get very wrapped up in med school and I found that I got a better mental break from having a full day off, rather than splitting my weekend work onto both days. 
    Exams include:
    Fall Year 1: midterm around October that covers the first 6-8 weeks. Roughly 100 questions, MCQ.
    Finals:
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a FoS (foundations of scholarship) MCQ a formative (not for marks) OSCE Spring Year 1: a midterm  
    Finals: 
    an MCQ that covers the second half of the semester a lab exam (radiology, histology, anatomy) a summative (for marks) OSCE FoS exam (thanks to @casjayo for correcting me on the updated schedule!) Year 2 is pretty similar with midterms and final MCQ and lab exams and a summative OSCE in spring, but there is no FoS or formative OSCE. 
     
    My apologies for this massive wall of text, hope some of it is helpful, and I'm sure @casajayo may have more recent insight, given that they change the curriculum year to year. 
  11. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to Yellowhead in Doug Ford to cap OHIP-covered psychotherapy   
    Interesting perspective.
    The Ontario Ministry of Heath and Long-term care has proposed limiting OHIP coverage to 24 hours of psychotherapy sessions per year. This is well-above the 16-20 hours of psychotherapy reserved for many evidence based psychotherapy approaches such as CBT. Of course, some patients may need more comprehensive and long-term care, and we should appropriately strive to create a system that can fulfill the needs of such patients.However, villainizing a system that seeks to create checks and bounds is not entirely fair. It is also counterproductive in creating a health care system that is effective and efficient.
    Perhaps, a more important question to ask is whether GPs are the most qualified professionals to provide psychological care (let alone such care to patients with complex and ongoing mental health care needs) to begin with? Access to health care and effective and appropriate health care are not synonymous. The reality is that GPs are not specifically trained to manage psychiatric disorders. Authorizing GPs to bill OHIP for an unlimited number of psychotherapy sessions per year may not only cause inadvertent harm to patients (i.e. increased dependency, worsening of symptoms) and doctors; given the unique demands associated with providing psychological care, but may also lead to increased wait times and diminished quality of care for other patients. In my opinion, a more appropriate avenue would be to implement a program that provides public funding for psychotherapists, psychologists and/or clinical counsellors i.e. those solely trained to manage and/or treat psychiatric illness, while still allowing GPs to provide psychotherapy within a system that has implemented the appropriate checks and bounds to ensure quality of care and prevent misuse. Mental health care is undoubtedly important and I think it's important that patients receive the most appropriate and effective care. This, is second to none.
  12. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to Yellowhead in Doug Ford to cap OHIP-covered psychotherapy   
    Far too many GPs are offering ongoing psychotherapy when they are ill-adequately trained to do so. Presently, they can bill OHIP for an unlimited number of "psychotherapy" sessions per year. This contravenes the scope and purpose of evidenced-based psychotherapy which is most commonly limited to X number of sessions. Ford's proposed plan aims to hold doctor's accountable who unscrupulously bill OHIP for mental health care rendered that is not always in the best interests of the patient. The proposed changes do not seek to cease the ability of doctor's to provide psychotherapy, but rather to limit the maximum number of sessions doctor's can bill OHIP under this category, and further, to discourage the practice of "boutique psychiatrists" i.e. those psychiatrist whom only see a select few patients multiple times per year and who selectively avoid new patient intakes. The proposed changes are reasonable and justified. Increased efficiency and improved quality of care are steps in the right direction.
  13. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from bluewhale in Anyone ONLY being considered for NMP?   
    I don’t know exactly how the process works, but I’ve literally seen the email a current classmate got that said they were only being considered for NMP.
    So there’s at least one person in my class who was accepted after receiving the same email  good luck @bluewhale!
  14. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to PhD2MD in Failed a Semester   
    Definitely technically salvageable....the question is can you address whatever the problem was and make sure it doesn't keep happening.
  15. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to bearded frog in "Are you sure you want to go into family?"   
    I think you're reading this wrong, and it might have nothing to do with prestige, its just how people complement you. Like I'm sure if there was a surgery gunner who did well on their family med rotation and the family doc attending said "sure you don't want to do family" with a smile as a complement then nobody would get offended by it. It's just another way of saying you did a good job, as good as a job as someone who would want to do this as a career. I've been told that multiple times in med school and on subspeciality rotations in residency.
  16. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from ohimark in Anyone ONLY being considered for NMP?   
    I don’t know exactly how the process works, but I’ve literally seen the email a current classmate got that said they were only being considered for NMP.
    So there’s at least one person in my class who was accepted after receiving the same email  good luck @bluewhale!
  17. Thanks
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from ATG4B in UBC Post Interview Impressions.   
    All UBC students apply for bursary in the fall. If you meet the need threshold, there is a very large pot of money that is divided amongst everyone in the Faculty of Medicine who met that threshold. The money you get is usually ~7000 - 10000 per year, aka about what most people would make by working over the summer. I can't remember the exact details of the application and how they assess need, but basically it's usually better to just not work. 
  18. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to ZBL in I really want to be a plastic surgeon..   
    Agree with this actually. Or do research on the topic. You don’t need to be a doctor to know what makes someone attractive or how humans perceive beauty.
    1. Have some decency. You’re not even in med school yet. IF you get into med school, I urge you to actually spend time shadowing a variety of specialties to see what you like and don’t like before deciding. Chances are you haven’t a clue what a plastic surgeons life as actually like.
    2. If your primary goal out of med school is aesthetics, you will severely, greatly, absolutely, and regrettably HATE going through absolute hell of med school, residency, fellowships and getting practice started in cosmetics. I don’t care why people go into medicine, or what specialty they choose - everyone has their own reason, but for your sake I hope it’s more than just cosmetics. Everyone thinks cosmetics is la-dee-da hang a sign and now you’re Beverly Hills chillin’, but it’s seriously an absolute grind. The money involved in setting up a fancy private clinic, the time it takes to get a decent patient load, and the hours involved in clinic, surgery and managing your business is no joke. That’s to say nothing about being able to carve out a niche in already saturated big cities  
    3. Chill. Plastics chooses you, you don’t choose platics. If they want you, it will work out that way. 
  19. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to LostLamb in Tell us your Med School admission story ...   
    I was home visiting my family, just checking my email on the computer that was located in the basement of my their home.
    I saw CONGRATULATIONS in the subject line in my email inbox and literally screamed.
    The funniest thing was that the only person inside the house was my brother, who has autism and who is limitedly verbal. He was on the main floor watching TV. He is a man of few words, and his response, in his usual affectated speech, was "be quiet!." 
    I explained to him that this time I don't have to be! Then I ran outside where my mum was working in the garden and chatting with the neighbour and exclaimed "I got in!!!" She dropped what she was doing, quickly explained what I meant to the neighbour, and then we went inside to share via telephone with my father, aunts, and other brother.
    Recalling this story even today, the most bittersweet part was when I called my then boyfriend to share the news. I was met with dead silence on the other end of the line. I was accepted to med school in a different city from where he lived. And that was the beginning of the end of our relationship.
    All that said, I was happily single through med school and had things not gone this way I would not have met my husband in early residency. Truly, things happen for a reason.
    Fifth application and finally, fifth time lucky...
  20. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from LostLamb in Tell us your Med School admission story ...   
    I had taken the weekend off and went on a small trip with my mum (trying to avoid the situation with my third year application where I got the rejection email at work and almost cried in front of my thesis supervisor and then actually cried that night in front of the director and cast of a play while I was in the middle of rehearsal). 
    I tried to hike and relax and not check my phone until the end of the day (but in reality was checking every time we had reception). I finally got the email while driving back to town from a hike and literally shrieked in the car. I think my dad was the first person I called after my mum and I calmed down a bit. My grandmother cried and gushed for about 3 minutes straight when I called to tell her afterwards.
  21. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from frenchpress in Seeking mental healthcare during medical training   
    My doctor is unaffiliated with the faculty, so whenever I needed a prescription or a referral to a specialist/physio, I knew that she wasn't going to be brushing shoulders with faculty members in charge of program assessment. I also always asked for referrals to be to specialists uninvolved with the faculty. 
    Personally, I choose not to talk to anyone associated with the faculty about sensitive health issues. I know that everything you discuss with student affairs is supposed to be confidential, but I worry regardless. Unfortunately, if you need counselling and can't afford to pay for it privately, you may have to decide whether the free services provided by your school are worth the small risk of information getting out. 
     
     
  22. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from targaryen in Tell us your Med School admission story ...   
    I had taken the weekend off and went on a small trip with my mum (trying to avoid the situation with my third year application where I got the rejection email at work and almost cried in front of my thesis supervisor and then actually cried that night in front of the director and cast of a play while I was in the middle of rehearsal). 
    I tried to hike and relax and not check my phone until the end of the day (but in reality was checking every time we had reception). I finally got the email while driving back to town from a hike and literally shrieked in the car. I think my dad was the first person I called after my mum and I calmed down a bit. My grandmother cried and gushed for about 3 minutes straight when I called to tell her afterwards.
  23. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from Bambi in Seeking mental healthcare during medical training   
    My doctor is unaffiliated with the faculty, so whenever I needed a prescription or a referral to a specialist/physio, I knew that she wasn't going to be brushing shoulders with faculty members in charge of program assessment. I also always asked for referrals to be to specialists uninvolved with the faculty. 
    Personally, I choose not to talk to anyone associated with the faculty about sensitive health issues. I know that everything you discuss with student affairs is supposed to be confidential, but I worry regardless. Unfortunately, if you need counselling and can't afford to pay for it privately, you may have to decide whether the free services provided by your school are worth the small risk of information getting out. 
     
     
  24. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS reacted to HappyAndHopeful in Tell us your Med School admission story ...   
    I don’t think this is a silly thread at all... I remember reading a similar one a few weeks before we got our results a couple years ago, too!  
    I had taken the day off work and planned to sleep in until 10:00 so I wasn’t checking my email every 2 minutes. Of course, I wasn’t able to sleep well, and I kept waking up every half hour or so. I woke up at 7:00 and had no emails, so I went back to sleep and woke up again around 7:30. My emails had just come in, and I found out that I was accepted. I think I was pretty shocked and whispered “oh my gosh”, lol. My SO was still asleep and wasn’t answering the phone, so I went downstairs and told my parents. They were ecstatic and had me call my grandparents and aunt and uncle. Then I got through to my SO, and texted my friend. Everyone was thrilled  It was a great day! 
  25. Like
    OwnerOfTheTARDIS got a reaction from HappyAndHopeful in Tell us your Med School admission story ...   
    I had taken the weekend off and went on a small trip with my mum (trying to avoid the situation with my third year application where I got the rejection email at work and almost cried in front of my thesis supervisor and then actually cried that night in front of the director and cast of a play while I was in the middle of rehearsal). 
    I tried to hike and relax and not check my phone until the end of the day (but in reality was checking every time we had reception). I finally got the email while driving back to town from a hike and literally shrieked in the car. I think my dad was the first person I called after my mum and I calmed down a bit. My grandmother cried and gushed for about 3 minutes straight when I called to tell her afterwards.
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