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PhD2MD

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  1. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from fpolica in Phd2Md's Advice On Interviewing Well   
    Hi everyone,
     
    This community has been a great resource for me, so I've been looking for a way to give back. Ever since D-day (aka May 10th for my fellow OMSAS warriors), I've been getting lots of PMs about interview skills. Partly because I got multiple offers, and partly because on my A/W/R posts I noted how well the interviews went. Rather than answering each PM separately I figured I'd make a post to point people towards so that others might benefit in the future.
     
    I'm not an interview god, I didn't know how to interview before I started, and I wasn't confident in my skills going in. However, the people I practiced with did compliment me quite a bit, and during my interviews several interviewer remarked on how well the conversation was going. I'm pretty sure that interviewers aren't supposed to give you any sort of feedback, but mine did. At the end of my Western interview, my interviewers spent about 10 minutes talking about how perfect I am for Western and vice versa. During my U of T interviews, one interviewer ended the conversation by saying "good job buddy", another by saying "you're an amazing story teller", and another with "this was the most engaging conversation I've had today". So while I'm not a natural interviewee, and I was quite nervous about the whole interview process, things went well. Bellow is why I think it went well for me. It may work for you, it may not. This is a case study with n=1.
     
    There's nothing magic about it, there are no secrets. There are, however, golden basics rules. Follow them, they work, and don't tell yourself that you can skip the hard work and figure our how to interview by "cramming" for a week.
     
    For MMIs:
    -Find a good medical ethics book (ie: Doing Right, and some basic CanMEDS resource)
    -Find a good person (ie: a med student or anyone who interviews well and can give feedback)
    -Read the book, practice with the person (realistic role play), take their feedback and edit your answer. I couldn't always find someone to practice with so sometimes I would pretend someone was in the room, time my self, and hope others didn't think I was hallucinating.
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at MMI. See attachment for the Big List of MMI Questions, do as many as possible.
     
    For traditional interviews:
    -List ALL of your interesting personal stories (including ABS)
    -create a cool narrative (even if its short) for each one
    -incorporate a CanMEDS characteristic into each one (don't force it, it should be obvious from the way you tell the story)
    -Look up the top health/social news stories of the last 2-3 years and develop an opinion/narrative about those
    -Practice with someone (realistic, timed, role play), or alone (but still outloud) if need be
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at traditional interviews. See attachment for the Big List of Traditional Interview questions, do as many as possible
     
    General:
    -Start doing realistic practice early, even if you're still new to interviews, and do it frequently.
    -In my opinion you should start prepping for MMIs before you prep for traditional interviews, because the MMI "mindset" (fair, balanced, thoughtful) will be invaluable for traditional interview questions.
    -If you can walk in confident and calm, you've won half the battle. Practice this every time your practice interviewing.
    -Learning to interview well is a life-changing experience. It teaches you how to connect and interact better, it teaches you how to summarize sell your personal brand in a short period of time, it teaches you how to see what's important in someone else's eyes, and as a PhD student who is about to defend, it taught me how to make my research meaningful to pretty much everyone.
     
    Best of luck to all the MD hopefuls. If you have questions, please post in this thread instead of PMing me. If you have a question, chances are someone else will too, so it saves me from having to answer it multiple times and helps more people out. Plus, someone else might have a better answer than me.
     
    PS: I don't know who the original compiler/poster of these "Big Lists" is, but if someone does please link them so they can be credited for their awesome work
    Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    Big List of All Traditionl Interview Questions.pdf
  2. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from CRISPRgirl in Phd2Md's Advice On Interviewing Well   
    Hi everyone,
     
    This community has been a great resource for me, so I've been looking for a way to give back. Ever since D-day (aka May 10th for my fellow OMSAS warriors), I've been getting lots of PMs about interview skills. Partly because I got multiple offers, and partly because on my A/W/R posts I noted how well the interviews went. Rather than answering each PM separately I figured I'd make a post to point people towards so that others might benefit in the future.
     
    I'm not an interview god, I didn't know how to interview before I started, and I wasn't confident in my skills going in. However, the people I practiced with did compliment me quite a bit, and during my interviews several interviewer remarked on how well the conversation was going. I'm pretty sure that interviewers aren't supposed to give you any sort of feedback, but mine did. At the end of my Western interview, my interviewers spent about 10 minutes talking about how perfect I am for Western and vice versa. During my U of T interviews, one interviewer ended the conversation by saying "good job buddy", another by saying "you're an amazing story teller", and another with "this was the most engaging conversation I've had today". So while I'm not a natural interviewee, and I was quite nervous about the whole interview process, things went well. Bellow is why I think it went well for me. It may work for you, it may not. This is a case study with n=1.
     
    There's nothing magic about it, there are no secrets. There are, however, golden basics rules. Follow them, they work, and don't tell yourself that you can skip the hard work and figure our how to interview by "cramming" for a week.
     
    For MMIs:
    -Find a good medical ethics book (ie: Doing Right, and some basic CanMEDS resource)
    -Find a good person (ie: a med student or anyone who interviews well and can give feedback)
    -Read the book, practice with the person (realistic role play), take their feedback and edit your answer. I couldn't always find someone to practice with so sometimes I would pretend someone was in the room, time my self, and hope others didn't think I was hallucinating.
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at MMI. See attachment for the Big List of MMI Questions, do as many as possible.
     
    For traditional interviews:
    -List ALL of your interesting personal stories (including ABS)
    -create a cool narrative (even if its short) for each one
    -incorporate a CanMEDS characteristic into each one (don't force it, it should be obvious from the way you tell the story)
    -Look up the top health/social news stories of the last 2-3 years and develop an opinion/narrative about those
    -Practice with someone (realistic, timed, role play), or alone (but still outloud) if need be
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at traditional interviews. See attachment for the Big List of Traditional Interview questions, do as many as possible
     
    General:
    -Start doing realistic practice early, even if you're still new to interviews, and do it frequently.
    -In my opinion you should start prepping for MMIs before you prep for traditional interviews, because the MMI "mindset" (fair, balanced, thoughtful) will be invaluable for traditional interview questions.
    -If you can walk in confident and calm, you've won half the battle. Practice this every time your practice interviewing.
    -Learning to interview well is a life-changing experience. It teaches you how to connect and interact better, it teaches you how to summarize sell your personal brand in a short period of time, it teaches you how to see what's important in someone else's eyes, and as a PhD student who is about to defend, it taught me how to make my research meaningful to pretty much everyone.
     
    Best of luck to all the MD hopefuls. If you have questions, please post in this thread instead of PMing me. If you have a question, chances are someone else will too, so it saves me from having to answer it multiple times and helps more people out. Plus, someone else might have a better answer than me.
     
    PS: I don't know who the original compiler/poster of these "Big Lists" is, but if someone does please link them so they can be credited for their awesome work
    Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    Big List of All Traditionl Interview Questions.pdf
  3. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from dancer_md in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    Amen
  4. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from joshanih7 in Phd2Md's Advice On Interviewing Well   
    Hi everyone,
     
    This community has been a great resource for me, so I've been looking for a way to give back. Ever since D-day (aka May 10th for my fellow OMSAS warriors), I've been getting lots of PMs about interview skills. Partly because I got multiple offers, and partly because on my A/W/R posts I noted how well the interviews went. Rather than answering each PM separately I figured I'd make a post to point people towards so that others might benefit in the future.
     
    I'm not an interview god, I didn't know how to interview before I started, and I wasn't confident in my skills going in. However, the people I practiced with did compliment me quite a bit, and during my interviews several interviewer remarked on how well the conversation was going. I'm pretty sure that interviewers aren't supposed to give you any sort of feedback, but mine did. At the end of my Western interview, my interviewers spent about 10 minutes talking about how perfect I am for Western and vice versa. During my U of T interviews, one interviewer ended the conversation by saying "good job buddy", another by saying "you're an amazing story teller", and another with "this was the most engaging conversation I've had today". So while I'm not a natural interviewee, and I was quite nervous about the whole interview process, things went well. Bellow is why I think it went well for me. It may work for you, it may not. This is a case study with n=1.
     
    There's nothing magic about it, there are no secrets. There are, however, golden basics rules. Follow them, they work, and don't tell yourself that you can skip the hard work and figure our how to interview by "cramming" for a week.
     
    For MMIs:
    -Find a good medical ethics book (ie: Doing Right, and some basic CanMEDS resource)
    -Find a good person (ie: a med student or anyone who interviews well and can give feedback)
    -Read the book, practice with the person (realistic role play), take their feedback and edit your answer. I couldn't always find someone to practice with so sometimes I would pretend someone was in the room, time my self, and hope others didn't think I was hallucinating.
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at MMI. See attachment for the Big List of MMI Questions, do as many as possible.
     
    For traditional interviews:
    -List ALL of your interesting personal stories (including ABS)
    -create a cool narrative (even if its short) for each one
    -incorporate a CanMEDS characteristic into each one (don't force it, it should be obvious from the way you tell the story)
    -Look up the top health/social news stories of the last 2-3 years and develop an opinion/narrative about those
    -Practice with someone (realistic, timed, role play), or alone (but still outloud) if need be
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at traditional interviews. See attachment for the Big List of Traditional Interview questions, do as many as possible
     
    General:
    -Start doing realistic practice early, even if you're still new to interviews, and do it frequently.
    -In my opinion you should start prepping for MMIs before you prep for traditional interviews, because the MMI "mindset" (fair, balanced, thoughtful) will be invaluable for traditional interview questions.
    -If you can walk in confident and calm, you've won half the battle. Practice this every time your practice interviewing.
    -Learning to interview well is a life-changing experience. It teaches you how to connect and interact better, it teaches you how to summarize sell your personal brand in a short period of time, it teaches you how to see what's important in someone else's eyes, and as a PhD student who is about to defend, it taught me how to make my research meaningful to pretty much everyone.
     
    Best of luck to all the MD hopefuls. If you have questions, please post in this thread instead of PMing me. If you have a question, chances are someone else will too, so it saves me from having to answer it multiple times and helps more people out. Plus, someone else might have a better answer than me.
     
    PS: I don't know who the original compiler/poster of these "Big Lists" is, but if someone does please link them so they can be credited for their awesome work
    Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    Big List of All Traditionl Interview Questions.pdf
  5. Thanks
    PhD2MD got a reaction from medicallyricalmiracle in Past and Current Ontario students: what factors should we consider when picking a school?   
    Social support, QOL of the city, and then home program is a distant third 
    In terms of city QOL, depends if you want a bigger city or young part vibe, vs more mature and chill.
  6. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from ChemPetE in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    Amen
  7. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to #YOLO in Things you wish you knew before you started med   
    if u can tolerate fm...theres no reason to do anything else
  8. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from Tullius in Surgical specialties with good job prospects?   
    Come to think of it, we're too often told not to consider any of the key factors that most people use to decide on a career (other than interest in theoretical subject matter).
  9. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from IronDuck in Surgical specialties with good job prospects?   
    Come to think of it, we're too often told not to consider any of the key factors that most people use to decide on a career (other than interest in theoretical subject matter).
  10. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from apple94 in Post-match depression   
    The reason it's disturbing is not because of what it shows about resident's character. Instead it's disturbing because it reveals that the magic/honeymoon phase/idealization of medicine that we all had before getting in, doesn't last very long once you're here.
    Not even matching to your #1 choice, or landing your "ideal" job makes up for it.
  11. Thanks
    PhD2MD got a reaction from BA22 in MSc eHealth? I'd appreciate any insight!   
    She went the RD route, sorry.
    Don't know what the value is, but I think it gives you freedom to create value, finding random niches. That's my impression.
  12. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from medisforme in Post-match depression   
    The reason it's disturbing is not because of what it shows about resident's character. Instead it's disturbing because it reveals that the magic/honeymoon phase/idealization of medicine that we all had before getting in, doesn't last very long once you're here.
    Not even matching to your #1 choice, or landing your "ideal" job makes up for it.
  13. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from shematoma in Post-match depression   
    The reason it's disturbing is not because of what it shows about resident's character. Instead it's disturbing because it reveals that the magic/honeymoon phase/idealization of medicine that we all had before getting in, doesn't last very long once you're here.
    Not even matching to your #1 choice, or landing your "ideal" job makes up for it.
  14. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to 1D7 in NP/Physician assistant EM "Residents" in USA to make more than medical residents   
    We will be shielded somewhat since our system focuses more on cost savings rather than profit. In the American system someone ordering unnecessary tests and consults is encouraged because it generates more billings for the hospital. Administrators realize this which is why midlevel expansion has been much slower here.
    My worry is that public opinion and politicians will be the ones who make the end decision, not the administrators who can see/understand the numbers. The general public doesn't care if a doctor works 80 hours/week after 8 years of training at 80-100 hours/week—all they see is that the doctor has a bigger dollar/year figure. The fact that a midlevel is less efficient is actually perceived positively by patients since they get more time with their medical provider.
    And because nurses actually collaborate/unite instead of ripping each other up like doctors do, they can maintain a good PR machine while doctors are picked apart villified by the media.
  15. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from Zuk in NP/Physician assistant EM "Residents" in USA to make more than medical residents   
    PA (and specialized RNs/NPs) are the best bang for buck careers right now. Low opportunity cost, no overheard, short training, minimal personal liability, much better hours, all for a six-figure salary that is actually higher than some MDs (170k for example is more than a good chunk of FP, neuro, peds docs).
    I enjoy medicine, but when kids ask me about going into the field, I ask them to make a serious cost-benefit analysis considering all of the above before they chose MD over PA/NP. The system/patients would benefit from more MDs, but it's probably in an individuals best interest to become a mid-level.
  16. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from mtpn in Phd2Md's Advice On Interviewing Well   
    Hi everyone,
     
    This community has been a great resource for me, so I've been looking for a way to give back. Ever since D-day (aka May 10th for my fellow OMSAS warriors), I've been getting lots of PMs about interview skills. Partly because I got multiple offers, and partly because on my A/W/R posts I noted how well the interviews went. Rather than answering each PM separately I figured I'd make a post to point people towards so that others might benefit in the future.
     
    I'm not an interview god, I didn't know how to interview before I started, and I wasn't confident in my skills going in. However, the people I practiced with did compliment me quite a bit, and during my interviews several interviewer remarked on how well the conversation was going. I'm pretty sure that interviewers aren't supposed to give you any sort of feedback, but mine did. At the end of my Western interview, my interviewers spent about 10 minutes talking about how perfect I am for Western and vice versa. During my U of T interviews, one interviewer ended the conversation by saying "good job buddy", another by saying "you're an amazing story teller", and another with "this was the most engaging conversation I've had today". So while I'm not a natural interviewee, and I was quite nervous about the whole interview process, things went well. Bellow is why I think it went well for me. It may work for you, it may not. This is a case study with n=1.
     
    There's nothing magic about it, there are no secrets. There are, however, golden basics rules. Follow them, they work, and don't tell yourself that you can skip the hard work and figure our how to interview by "cramming" for a week.
     
    For MMIs:
    -Find a good medical ethics book (ie: Doing Right, and some basic CanMEDS resource)
    -Find a good person (ie: a med student or anyone who interviews well and can give feedback)
    -Read the book, practice with the person (realistic role play), take their feedback and edit your answer. I couldn't always find someone to practice with so sometimes I would pretend someone was in the room, time my self, and hope others didn't think I was hallucinating.
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at MMI. See attachment for the Big List of MMI Questions, do as many as possible.
     
    For traditional interviews:
    -List ALL of your interesting personal stories (including ABS)
    -create a cool narrative (even if its short) for each one
    -incorporate a CanMEDS characteristic into each one (don't force it, it should be obvious from the way you tell the story)
    -Look up the top health/social news stories of the last 2-3 years and develop an opinion/narrative about those
    -Practice with someone (realistic, timed, role play), or alone (but still outloud) if need be
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at traditional interviews. See attachment for the Big List of Traditional Interview questions, do as many as possible
     
    General:
    -Start doing realistic practice early, even if you're still new to interviews, and do it frequently.
    -In my opinion you should start prepping for MMIs before you prep for traditional interviews, because the MMI "mindset" (fair, balanced, thoughtful) will be invaluable for traditional interview questions.
    -If you can walk in confident and calm, you've won half the battle. Practice this every time your practice interviewing.
    -Learning to interview well is a life-changing experience. It teaches you how to connect and interact better, it teaches you how to summarize sell your personal brand in a short period of time, it teaches you how to see what's important in someone else's eyes, and as a PhD student who is about to defend, it taught me how to make my research meaningful to pretty much everyone.
     
    Best of luck to all the MD hopefuls. If you have questions, please post in this thread instead of PMing me. If you have a question, chances are someone else will too, so it saves me from having to answer it multiple times and helps more people out. Plus, someone else might have a better answer than me.
     
    PS: I don't know who the original compiler/poster of these "Big Lists" is, but if someone does please link them so they can be credited for their awesome work
    Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    Big List of All Traditionl Interview Questions.pdf
  17. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to gangliocytoma in Queen's Anesthesia Interview   
    It's actually quite perplexing to hear this. I (and all the classmates I've talked to) had an awesome anesthesia core rotation at Queen's. The staff were awesome teachers, the residents all looked happy and enjoyed their program. I felt super welcomed each time I walked into the OR and actually for the first time in clerkship, felt like I was able to meaningfully contribute to the care of a patient because of how hands on they allow medical students to be. It was only my third rotation, but the teaching I got from working with the staff one-on-one was awesome. It's so strange hearing these things. I guess what is more strange is that the is program is acting very differently from how it normally does
  18. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to rmorelan in Queen's Anesthesia Interview   
    I don't think the staff are normally cruel or horrible people ha
    I just think someone got it in their head that stressing people out like this is somehow something necessary to test for in a candidate (perhaps because it rarely occurs despite efforts otherwise). 
    That could explain it, but not excuse it. They may otherwise be great teachers, and the program may even be excellent. Problem is it is hard to take that chance. 
     
  19. Thanks
    PhD2MD got a reaction from Dr. JJ in Psych Job Market in Eastern Ontario   
    Insider info for Kingston: two of the psych doc's with the largest outpatient pools are retiring in the next year or two. Demand is about to skyrocket around Kingston.
  20. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from ChemPetE in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    That's assuming the specialists catch up at all. Bunch of us (including mine) never do/makee than FM, and have less flexibility for changing our practice focus or revenue source.
    If you enjoy clinic/family, take it VERY seriously.
  21. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from MedZZZ in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    That's assuming the specialists catch up at all. Bunch of us (including mine) never do/makee than FM, and have less flexibility for changing our practice focus or revenue source.
    If you enjoy clinic/family, take it VERY seriously.
  22. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to rmorelan in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    No it shouldn't - and if you objectively do the math it would take a couple of decades for most specialists to "catch up" - I really think that point is not stressed enough with the entire money side of medicine is talked about. Comparing apples to apples the say 3-5 years (or more) head start is really powerful. Factor in the fact that many of those specialists have no choice but to work more hours than a typical family doctors so to truly compare things you also have to equate that as well  (and of course extra hours often at worse times) .
    Some of the smartest BUSINESS minded doctors from my class objectively compared things and just went to family. It is actually hard to argue with their logic when you really look at things. 
    and even now ha - there is part of myself that thinks it would have been really nice if I just personally liked the field as a profession as there is so much going for it. I don't think I would, which is why I did something else but I am on that 5 extra year pathway, so I can really see the effects at this point (4 months to go ha!).  Five years of 80+ hour work weeks ha...and over 200 all nighters extra over FM, 12 months of every waking moment preparing for a crushing exam, and really not a ton of control over your schedule or major aspects of your life. 
     
  23. Like
    PhD2MD reacted to 1D7 in Is family medicine really that bad?   
    The 'younger' family docs (20s-40s) I've worked with have all been happy with their lives. There's stuff they don't like (mostly paperwork, admin, and certain patients) but none of them would prefer to sacrifice lifestyle for it (location, hours, call, additional painful years in residency). My own family doc encouraged me to pursue family medicine for whatever that's worth.
    I don't think pay should be a big factor in your decision since family medicine does out earn some 4-5 year specialty residencies (e.g . neuro, paeds, etc.) and has options to literally be some of the highest earners. Additionally the fact that you start earning some real money 3-5 years earlier than many other specialties puts you ahead in terms of life and investments, which is worth quite a bit with our decade-long bull market. It's not all sunshine and roses but people tend to overemphasize the downsides of family medicine.
    As for what you read on the Internet and hear from vocal physicians, there is a lot of 'grass is greener' phenomenon. In general all of us are expected to work and do more despite fewer resources and down trending pay. Complex psychosocial issues are now increasingly being encountered and affecting our ability to provide care in non-psychiatric specialties like emergency medicine, internal medicine, even radiology. The respect for being a physician has diminished with the rise of the Internet, hostile media, pseudo-medical organizations (e.g. NDs gaining prescribing rights), anti-science movements (e.g. anti-vaxxers). This is also exacerbated by American sentiments regarding primary care, where not only does family medicine experience the same issues with greater severity, but also face openly hostile midlevel organizations. If you enjoyed your family med rotation, I would not let these things dissuade you—these are challenges that we will face in one way or another across all specialties.
  24. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from tennie in Phd2Md's Advice On Interviewing Well   
    Hi everyone,
     
    This community has been a great resource for me, so I've been looking for a way to give back. Ever since D-day (aka May 10th for my fellow OMSAS warriors), I've been getting lots of PMs about interview skills. Partly because I got multiple offers, and partly because on my A/W/R posts I noted how well the interviews went. Rather than answering each PM separately I figured I'd make a post to point people towards so that others might benefit in the future.
     
    I'm not an interview god, I didn't know how to interview before I started, and I wasn't confident in my skills going in. However, the people I practiced with did compliment me quite a bit, and during my interviews several interviewer remarked on how well the conversation was going. I'm pretty sure that interviewers aren't supposed to give you any sort of feedback, but mine did. At the end of my Western interview, my interviewers spent about 10 minutes talking about how perfect I am for Western and vice versa. During my U of T interviews, one interviewer ended the conversation by saying "good job buddy", another by saying "you're an amazing story teller", and another with "this was the most engaging conversation I've had today". So while I'm not a natural interviewee, and I was quite nervous about the whole interview process, things went well. Bellow is why I think it went well for me. It may work for you, it may not. This is a case study with n=1.
     
    There's nothing magic about it, there are no secrets. There are, however, golden basics rules. Follow them, they work, and don't tell yourself that you can skip the hard work and figure our how to interview by "cramming" for a week.
     
    For MMIs:
    -Find a good medical ethics book (ie: Doing Right, and some basic CanMEDS resource)
    -Find a good person (ie: a med student or anyone who interviews well and can give feedback)
    -Read the book, practice with the person (realistic role play), take their feedback and edit your answer. I couldn't always find someone to practice with so sometimes I would pretend someone was in the room, time my self, and hope others didn't think I was hallucinating.
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at MMI. See attachment for the Big List of MMI Questions, do as many as possible.
     
    For traditional interviews:
    -List ALL of your interesting personal stories (including ABS)
    -create a cool narrative (even if its short) for each one
    -incorporate a CanMEDS characteristic into each one (don't force it, it should be obvious from the way you tell the story)
    -Look up the top health/social news stories of the last 2-3 years and develop an opinion/narrative about those
    -Practice with someone (realistic, timed, role play), or alone (but still outloud) if need be
    -Wash, rinse repeat on a regular basis (I did 1-2 hours per day for a few weeks). Only time will make your comfortable, confident, and cunning at traditional interviews. See attachment for the Big List of Traditional Interview questions, do as many as possible
     
    General:
    -Start doing realistic practice early, even if you're still new to interviews, and do it frequently.
    -In my opinion you should start prepping for MMIs before you prep for traditional interviews, because the MMI "mindset" (fair, balanced, thoughtful) will be invaluable for traditional interview questions.
    -If you can walk in confident and calm, you've won half the battle. Practice this every time your practice interviewing.
    -Learning to interview well is a life-changing experience. It teaches you how to connect and interact better, it teaches you how to summarize sell your personal brand in a short period of time, it teaches you how to see what's important in someone else's eyes, and as a PhD student who is about to defend, it taught me how to make my research meaningful to pretty much everyone.
     
    Best of luck to all the MD hopefuls. If you have questions, please post in this thread instead of PMing me. If you have a question, chances are someone else will too, so it saves me from having to answer it multiple times and helps more people out. Plus, someone else might have a better answer than me.
     
    PS: I don't know who the original compiler/poster of these "Big Lists" is, but if someone does please link them so they can be credited for their awesome work
    Big List of MMI Questions.pdf
    Big List of All Traditionl Interview Questions.pdf
  25. Like
    PhD2MD got a reaction from Raptors905 in Rads Pay   
    Yeah and I'd also say that that logic should be applied to the services that make management decisions (some times split second ones like in stroke) based on their own reading of scans, independent from the rads read that may show up hours to days later.
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