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3booodi

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About 3booodi

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  1. That made sense. By the looks of it, going for any health care profession in fact, is somewhat of a financial suicide if one is coming back here. The reason that I asked this question is me being curious on how Canadian students that want to come back to Canada deal with this debt. I am also asking this because I had a chat with a D4 who stated that few of his colleagues made from 150-180K USD, so after taxes that would be 100-130K$ USD, which in relative terms can be comparable to a Canadian student's debt from a Canadian school. It seems if one goes that route, he will end up having a total in assets that's comparable to a starting engineer, for example. Really puts things in perspective.
  2. I mean, isn't that the case in almost all professions? Well... Shit.
  3. Fair enough. The things that is looking optimistic is the increase of the prime rate in Bank of Canada, which in my understanding, is an indication of good economic standing. Wouldn't that mean that USD: CAD would start to creep up to be even? I am neglecting the fact that interest rates are increasing as well, which applies to student loans, but if that would be the case, why would it still be a problem?
  4. Hey everyone, I have been researching this topic on several forums and all over the internet for the past two days with no success. Since I am personally considering dentistry, I would like to keep my doors open with schools outside of Canada. My GPA is not that great, but I still have time to recover and maybe have a shot in Canada. I am curious on how the students that go abroad, specifically the US, manage their debt. Do you have a plan on repayment? If so, mind describing it briefly? After researching that topic a lot, I concluded that debt can be repaid (in Canada) within 3-10 years depending on where you're practicing, and how aggressive you would want to repay your debt. That makes sense since the average dept of Canadian dental school is ~250k CAD. But looking at a relatively not expensive school like Case Western, one could end up with 300k USD which is around 400K CAD with today's exchange rate. What are your guys' opinions towards it, strictly from a financial point of view. Cheers!
  5. May I know what the cutoffs are?
  6. They're counted towards your cGPA, and they want to ensure that you took them.
  7. They don't care if you take a million courses above the pre reqs. Taking a physiology course that's complementary to the previous one won't boost your gpa, they will account it as a new course by its own. Best thing to do is to take an easier course that you're willing to put work into .
  8. Rule of thumb is to be as conservative as possible. Meaning is that you aim to preserve your gpa and keep it as high as possible. If you feel you can't handle the workload, then you shouldn't take that number of labs/courses. I am in engineering, and in some semesters I need to take 7 courses, and the norm is 6. I did almost half of the pre reqs. I took summer school and planned my schedule accordingly. I am starting my second semester of second year.
  9. As to Canada, there are. Check out the atlantic bridge program and oztrekk dentistry to see what unis are accredited by the Canadian board. One thing to watch out for is that although these schools are accredited by Canada, it doesn't necceseraliy mean that they are accredited in the US. Now if you want to have the freedom to work in the US and Canada, I am pretty sure that your best bet is to attend dental school in one of those countries. If you're a US resident, it is a tad bit easier to attend school there due to the greater volume of dental students these schools can receive. and as you mentioned in your formula, this is the way to go. The OSCE exam is a licensure exam you take when you finish dental school. Based on what I've researched, the passing rate is ridiculously high (obviously), so it's something you really shouldn't care about.
  10. My parents graduated from overseas, so I know the process. If you were planning to work in the US and want to attend a dental school outside of North America you will have 2 options: 1) Go to a dental school anywhere in the world straight from high school (granted that the school is not accredited in the US board of dentists), obtain your degree (BDS or DDS, it doesn't matter, they don't give two shits) come back to the US, and go through the long and painful equivalency process ( I only know of Canada's equivalency procedure). 2) Complete your undergrad in any degree, get the pre reqs courses completed of the designated international school ( that is accredited by the US board of dentists) you want to attend, get your degree, come back to the US, and do a single exam (quick, and relatively way easier; not a lengthy process) and practice. The same exact procedure applies to Canada. If you were to go to a non accredited school, and you want to come back to Canada, you have 2 options for degree equivalency: 1) The direct examination route: You do three exams, and they are difficult, not going to sugar coat it at all, and then you do the OSCE exam, and you're set. 2) Attend the last 2 years of dental school in Canada. You do this by doing the very first exam of the three exams mentioned above, apply as an ITD ( you should show a proof of English language etc.), get interviewed, finish the last 2 years, and you're set. Lastly, I am not sure of how accurate this statement is, but US equivalency process is far easier than the Canadian one.
  11. 3booodi

    ....

    Just got my grades yesterday too. And my second 50 comes in (Engineering systems, surprise surprise) and dragged my whole average down. My first 50 was in chem I which I recovered back with a 90 in chem II. I still have hope. You can do it OP, just don't pick electives you feel you don't care about, because you won't, and it will come back to bite you.
  12. 3booodi

    Chances?

    May I ask what school was it? and what was the fee for application? Got me curious, might give it a shot.
  13. 3booodi

    Chances?

    Got it. Thank a ton.
  14. 3booodi

    Chances?

    Cheers man. Do you have any ideas about Ireland or Australia? Ps. Great bio, but the more I read through it, the more brain cells I lose.
  15. 3booodi

    Chances?

    I should've stated that when I said top 2 or 3 years, I was meaning hypothetically speaking when I finish my degree. I do know that the states are crazy with their fees. Curious to know if high 70's are heard of over there. Also, how about Australia and Ireland? And lastly, how influencing are DAT scores to Canadian schools (given that the gpa is on the very low end)?
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