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catchlynall

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About catchlynall

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  1. Wow I left the forums for a about a week and came back to this lively discussion! I agree with basically everyone. As a professional, I didn't use an email signature with colleagues or others who knew me. If I was emailing externally, for example, to a journal editor, to a REB, or to another external organization, I added a signature to provide context about my credentials and where I worked. I'll do the same for medicine - but I will put "Medical Student." I agree that "Candidate" is reserved for academic distinctions. I think that should be respected. Plus, you never know how the person on the other end feels. Thanks for the great discussion! (and jokes haha)
  2. Awesome, thanks! I was just submitting a manuscript and thought I would add my new medical school student status to the bottom of the cover letter to the editor. I decided not to, though, because the manuscript isn't medically related anyway.
  3. Hey everyone, What does your signature say, as a medical student? I ask because during my course-based Masters degree, some of us made the mistake of putting "MPH Candidate" in our signature. It turns out "Candidate" is an earned distinction for those Masters/PhD students who have almost completed their degrees (passed their comps? I'm not 100% sure on this because it was a while ago). So, do you put "MD Candidate, 2021"? Thanks in advance
  4. Hey there, I did the MPH at UofT in Health Promotion, but I knew some of the epi students. My impression of the epi program at UofT is that it is excellent. My colleagues are holding great jobs in public health units, research centres, etc. As far as progressing into med, I'm not too sure. The practicums for these programs are a great experience. The epi practicums are almost always paid. The course load in Health Promotion was manageable. I spent some times stressing about papers, and other times chilling. (But there were lots of readings in HP). I think an MPH-epi is a pretty interesting path to take to med school! It will definitely give you broader population-level and social determinants of health lenes through which to view health and disease.
  5. I applied to 10 schools across Canada (I'm from Ontario) and got one interview and one acceptance at an OOP school. My advice is to apply to as many schools as possible where you meet cut offs (provided you are not diluting the quality of each individual application).
  6. Oh thank you! I haven't been monitoring the Facebook group lately!
  7. Hey everyone, Just found this year's academic calendar and it says first years begin class on August 21. All of our communications so far have said Hippocratic Oath ceremony on Sunday August 27th and be there in the morning for orientation sign in on Monday the 28th. What do you make of this? here's the link: https://www.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/academics/academiccalendar/DLM_17_18_Calendar.pdf
  8. Hey there, Alpha Phi alumna here from Western. After having left the Western bubble and moving to Toronto, my experience has almost always been negative when telling people about my past involvement in a sorority. At this point, I actually don't mention it anymore unless it specifically comes up. While I had a great experience as an Alpha Phi, held multiple Director positions and a Vice Presidency, and made friendships to last a lifetime, I find others don't understand or look down on the experience. I've had a lot of time to reflect on this experience and what I would have done differently (to get in to med school), and what I will tell my kids one day. That is, if med school or another highly competitive post-grad degree is your goal, I would only suggest joining a frat if you plan to become President, or a Vice President. Then, my advice would be exactly what shikimate said above: You need to be able to answer these questions on your apps or in interviews to overcome the stigma that frats carry. You need to sell why this was such an important experience that helped you grow and develop as a person and young professional.
  9. Hey everyone, I decided not to comment after reading that first response to see what everyone else thought. Personally, I thought the comment was a bit aggressive and was taken aback, so I wanted to see where everyone else fell on this subject. I wasn't trying to "start something" - I wanted to open up a conversation. As for this being in the wrong thread, I'd be happy for you to point me to a more appropriate thread for a conversation like this, but I thought speculation about backpack colour is an appropriate place to ask these questions/talk about this. I understand that it's a lighthearted thread. I get that it's just a backpack. My point was that if they're making the backpack red for Canada 150, then we are linking these two unrelated ideas together. If we are linking, then what if they weren't red, and the reason was as I've said above - that not all people see Canada 150 as something to be unilaterally celebrated. I'm not apologizing for opening up a conversation that I think is important. Again, if there is a more appropriate place for things like this, please point me there.
  10. What if the backpacks aren't red? With all the hype around Canada 150 this year, we can easily forget to acknowledge that indigenous peoples have been on this land way way longer than 150 years. Canada becoming "Canada" is not a thing to be unilaterally celebrated for everyone. We have a long history of racism, residential schools, and cultural genocide that goes hand in hand with the birth of our nation. I think the backpacks will be red, but what if they weren't? What if acknowledging Canada's not so bright and shiny history is the reason why? I think that would be pretty great.
  11. Psych with Mike is great. The lectures don't align 1:1 to the text, so get ready for double studying. That being said, it is interesting stuff and will definitely help you on that section of the MCAT. I took this course in 2009-2010. (Damn I'm old.)
  12. Disclaimer: I have nothing to base this on other than my intuition and life experience. My feeling is that once you have progressed so far beyond your Bachelor's degree, it will matter less and less. You will have developed a full resume of extracurriculars and academic experiences in order to be accepted to medical school. Once you are in medical school, you will continue to build up your experiences. The fact that you had a BA instead of a BSc (I think) won't even be a consideration. Also, the mantra upon entering university is that you can go to med school with any degree. If there were penalties later on, there would be a revolt! Do what you want to do! Science courses are super helpful with writing the MCAT (I only took the basic sciences, no orgo or biochem because I did a Bachelor of Health Science).
  13. I'm glad this thread was brought up. I'm thinking about getting an IPad Pro to take notes, but I guess I'm hesitant about the ability to type and its ability to serve my needs when I'm on campus. I don't want to be carrying around my MacBook Air and IPad Pro - too heavy. I wrote my notes in undergrad because I like drawing diagrams, and also I think the speed constraints of hand writing force you to digest the material at that point and make it the most concise as possible. I guess my question is, are there med students out there who think that content is too heavy to be able to get it all in on handwriting alone? Thanks!
  14. I chose based on my history with the bank. Customer loyalty gives you a bargaining chip down the road IMO
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