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HalfBaked

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  1. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from lapin.bleu in Groupe Facebook de la nouvelle cohorte   
    Laval prend toujours plus de temps que les autres à créer le groupe, parce que les initiations prennent un peu plus de temps à organiser et on commence 2-3 semaines plus tard que les autres! Mais ça va surement arriver fin juillet/début août et tu pourras stalk les têtes que tu verras pour les 4-5 prochaines années 
  2. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from anthromd in .   
    I find the most representative are Next Step! They are a bit harder than the real mcat, but the scores I had with them were very representative of the score I ended having during my real Mcat. So I really, really, really, recommend NS. They are great! Then, I think EK is the second best. I honestly find no prep companies have good CARS section. Best is to take the CARS question that the AAMC offers to practice them and trying to find the VR section of old AAMC's full length tests.
    Also, don't be discouraged. The thing with the Mcat is that within a few months, you'll relearn how to take an exam (because the Mcat isn't like any other exam you ever had, it requires you learning new ways to tackle it than your standard science exams). I remember one of the prep class teacher I had explain, practicing the mcat is like practicing baseball. At first you may score some points but you'll have a bad technique while holding the bat. Then, while learning the correct position and how to wield the bat more efficiently, at first it will feel foreign and uncomfortable, so you'll end up scoring less than before, because you're learning a new technique. Finally, after many practice you'll end up "owning" those new methods and you'll be more efficient and score many more points than ever. Mcat is like practicing baseball, you'll learn new strategies, new ways to analyze texts rapidly, to chose the right answers, avoid traps, see the hints where they are. Those new strategies can feel overwhelming at first and  may end up in your scoring less, but by the end of the summer with enough practice (1-2 full length tests/week) you'll be above 127. 
    Don't lose hope. The best way to keep yourself motivated is to structure your schedule well, to pin point your weaknesses and work on them and to allow yourself some time off. Also, keep it as social as possible! Spend as much time with family& friends while you are not studying, and be sure to have a good support system so you can vent the frustration (:
    Good luck!
  3. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from medhope7 in What Is Your Opinion On The Help, Learn & Discover Program?   
    Everything Arztin said is just gold on this matter. 
     
    The only nuance I'd like to add to other comments is the idea helping in Canada or helping elsewhere is not mutually exclusive. You can both help our indigenous communities as well as go in another country to help other communities. But wherever you go, you need a strong background and formation before going and it has to be supervised and lead by more experienced local professionals. Also very important, you need an extensive formation on the country you are headed to, to really understand their reality and become very culturally sensitive to their perspectives on health. 
     
    Your actions have to be ethical no matter what your environment is. You wouldn't just go in just any Toronto hospital and start helping out surgeons, because you know you would be endangering patients with your lack of knowledge and competency. Then why take the risk elsewhere? Are their lives less important? I'm pretty sure no one is thinking that while volunteering abroad, but that is the underlying message I perceive unfortunately.
     
    And even if you just stand there and watch. You're telling me a patient may have to sit through one of the worst moments of his life, where he'll feel the most vulnerable and scared... being observed by a group of kids who probably won't understand much more of what is happening than him? All of that just so they can write in their personal essay and gush in their interview of how this experience completely transformed them and opened their eyes on some medical realities in other parts of the world?
     
    I'm really sorry for how harsh this may sound, I really don't want to judge people doing it, but I find their actions careless and thoughtless nonetheless. 
     
    I remember in some of my internships at the hospital, where I would follow and observe a dietitian, I noticed how a couple of patients were at first uncomfortable by my presence. But they understood why I was there, they knew my presence was required so I could learn and become a RD myself. But why should patients in other countries suffer the presence of unexperienced students if it is not to form professionals that will help their own society?
     
    When I finished my dietetics/nutrition degree, some of my fellow classmates went to Benin to give nutrition classes to other health professionals there. The whole program was based on a long-lasting partnership between our two universities. It was overseen by a RD and they had classes/activities all year to learn the local culture and food customs. When I asked them for feedback on the experience thinking of doing something similar myself, they told me that they felt awkward most of the time because they were giving them advices and knowledge based on their experiences and studies in Canada, that did not really apply to the local realities. This taught me that with all the care we may take when trying to avoid a paternalist approach of humanitarian help, the risks are still present for us perpetuating neocolonialist stereotypes.
     
    And I believe in humanitarian help. I think international collaboration in health can be crucial, mostly when dealing with "acute health crisis" like what Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross are doing. But I also believe we have to thoroughly think our approach so it can be helpful, adapted and anchored in a perspective of knowledge transfer rather of than this sort of dominant-dominee relationship where one country is almighty with knowledge and resources, and the other just passively waiting to be helped.
     
    Many sociologues, doctors and other professionals are working on it. And I'm pretty sure premeds students paying 3k to shadow in the morning, sunbath in the afternoon, are not what they have in mind.
  4. Thanks
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Focused in Admission Médecine 2017   
    Juger de la difficulté d'un programme c'est selon moi complètement obsolète dû à la subjectivité que ça demande. On a tous une vision biaisée selon nos forces et faiblesses de ce qui peut être difficile ou non. Je connaissais une fille qui trouvait les examens de type QCM HYPER dur, et pour moi c'est le paradis. Par contre, avec les CRU on parle d'IFG+d'écart-type donc de la difficulté qu'un étudiant aura à se démarquer des gens de son programme, et non de difficulté du programme en soi.
     
    J'ai aussi envie de rajouter ma montée de lait au débat pour expliquer que je trouve que certains programmes ont cependant le désavantage d'avoir des stages notés en milieu clinique, qui pour plusieurs raisons rendent l'obtention d'une gpa compétitive vraiment plus difficile à mon avis. 
    Mais je vais arrêter ici, parce que comme l'a dit Psy2017 ça sert à rien ce genre de réflexion. On est tous et toutes stressé(e)s et on peut passer des heures à essayer de comprendre pourquoi moi, pourquoi pas l'autre; pourquoi l'autre, pourquoi pas moi.
     
    Et c'est compréhensible, c'est tellement frustrant appliquer en médecine, parce que quand tu te fais refuser ou mettre sur une liste d'attente, ça créée cette insécurité et ce doute de "est-ce que je suis assez bon(ne) pour être médecin?" Mais, il faut se rappeler:
    1. Qu'il y a une composante chance peu importe comment tu essayes de recruter.
    2. Qu'en fin de compte, le processus d'admission est imparfait et le sera toujours parce que c'est impossible de créer un algorithme parfait qui donne LA meilleure prédiction de qui sera un(e) bon(ne) médecin.
    3. Qu'à chaque année d'excellent(e)s candidat(e)s sont refusé(e)s, et ce avant même les entrevues, dans n'importe quelle université.
    4. Ça rajoute une expérience qui permet de construire notre résilience, notre persévérance et solidifier notre envie d'entrer en médecine. Les études qu'on fait en attendant de rentrer ne seront pas perdues, au contraire, elles finiront par influencer notre pratique, notre perception de la santé et ce qu'on considère comme étant des soins de qualité. 
     
    Si ça peut aider, je me rappelle avoir lu un article d'une mère d'un étudiant en médecine. Elle racontait son expérience à une journée porte ouverte (pas au Québec, si je me rappelle bien c'était en Ontario). Bref, il y avait un professeur en médecine qui siégeait sur les comités d'admission avec qui elle discutait qui lui avait dit qu'il y a grosso-modo 3 sortes de candidats. Ceux qui sont exceptionnellement bons (des génies avec des accomplissements incroyables), ceux qui sont simplement inadéquats (genre une gpa de 2,1) et finalement la très très très grande majorité d'étudiants très bons (gpa compétitive, recherche, extracurriculars, clinical experience, good to outstanding mmi/casper scores). Dans le troisième groupe, pas mal tous les étudiants feraient des bons médecins et les départager devient si difficile que le médecin avait dit "that we accept the first hundred or the second hundred, that wouldn't change much".
     
    Maintenant, c'est du ouï-dire certes, mais je pense que ça illustre bien quelque chose sur laquelle on peut pas mal tous s'entendre: un réfus en médecine n'illustre pas nécessairement ne pas avoir le potentiel d'être un bon médecin. L'essentiel, c'est d'avoir de l'autocritique et de voir les failles dans son dossier de candidature et essayer de s'améliorer sans perdre confiance en soi. 

    Voilà, c'était mon 2 cents pas forcément pertinent mais j'espère aidera certaines personnes qui, comme moi, sont entrain de stresser en attente de réponse, de déprimer et/ou qui sont juste en légère crise existentielle. Je vous comprends et je pense que justement le but de ce forum c'est de s'aider, se supporter et se conseiller à travers ça. Donc, respirez profondément et comme Psy2017 l'a dit, ne laissez pas un processus administratif déterminer la valeur que vous vous accordez. Et si jamais quelqu'un a envie de parler, n'hésiter à m'envoyer un message, ça me fera plaisir qu'on partage nos inquiétudes/espoirs.

    Bonne chance tout le monde!
  5. Thanks
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Pharmed2008 in Cru Sherbooke   
    Moi je te conseille de rester en nutrition! C'est un programme plus "gérable" qu'ergo/physio selon moi. Honêtement j'ai comparé avec une amie et les cours sont moins exigeants, voir carrément plus humains. Par ailleurs, je sais que depuis l'an passé Sherbrooke a changé sa façon de noter le programme de nutrition et il me semble que selon une amie qui est passée de nutrition à médecine à sherbrooke, le programme en nutrition est considéré au même titre qu'un autre programme en santé. Mais le mieux serait d'appeler. Finalement, je sais aussi que l'an passé une dizaine d'étudiants sont passés de nutrition-udem à médecine sherbrooke/laval. Si tu trouves le programme intéressant, reste! Tes chances de pouvoir changer sont réelles et ne dépendent que de ton aptitude à obtenir de bonnes notes. Ton intérêt dans le programme est d'ailleurs un facteur important pour ta réussite scolaire. 
     
    Je ne peux malheureusement pas offrir plus d'informations que ces spéculations, mais bonne chance!
  6. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from vellichor in 2017 Backpack?   
    I personally found it to be an interesting reminder. We can be proud and patriotic and still leave room to constructive autocriticism. Md Financial said the backpack was about the CMA's 150th anniversary, so I mean, in a way it is still linked to Canada's 150th celebrations. And CMA's history is also one of being involved with at-risk minorities. So I don't think it was that off subject, though I also understand why some might think it is. I'm actually more than surprised to see the reactions this has brought.
    No one is being told that because you want a red backpack and/or because you want to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary that you are being intransigeant to indigenous communities. It's merely a reminder and a way to bring awareness. If that doesn't interest you, fine just dont reply and post a comment on a different facette of the subject.
    As for the restaurant analogy, well it is held in a private setting, whereas this forum is a public space where anyone can contribute in any way they see fit as long as they are being respectful. To be fair, there is no right place to talk about those kind of subjects. They will always make some people uncomfortable, or bore them, or annoy them, or kill their fun.
    As for being involved with indigenous communities. That is a great and commendable act. I find that amazing. But it would be equally amazing to not discourage someone who tried to open a discussion about the social injustices they're living. I'm pretty sure they would be thankful for that too. 
    And yes, it's just a backpack. Like it was just a seat in a bus, or just an apple that fell from a tree. From trivial objects can emerge amazing discoveries and history-changing events. I'm not saying this backpack is gonna start a revolution, but hey, if it can start a conversation on one, if not the most marginalized community in our country: it is a good thing. Telling someone that it isn't pertinent, that SJWs are invading again, that it should be discussed elsewhere, that it isn't about race/gender, that they are overreacting; well, it just stops all forms of debates. It's like taping someone's mouth and writing SJW on that tape. Anyone can be easily discredited and shushed like that, and change doesn't emerge without communication.  
    Just because you don't want to be part of a conversation, that doesn't mean you have to prevent that conversation from happening. And even if you think the conversation should happen but elsewhere, there are respectful ways to say it. "Hey, you should create a thread about indingenous communities in Canada so you can have a more appropriate environment for that debate" is better suited than "take your unnecessary comments elsewhere", don't you think?
  7. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from marblestatue in What Is Your Opinion On The Help, Learn & Discover Program?   
    Everything Arztin said is just gold on this matter. 
     
    The only nuance I'd like to add to other comments is the idea helping in Canada or helping elsewhere is not mutually exclusive. You can both help our indigenous communities as well as go in another country to help other communities. But wherever you go, you need a strong background and formation before going and it has to be supervised and lead by more experienced local professionals. Also very important, you need an extensive formation on the country you are headed to, to really understand their reality and become very culturally sensitive to their perspectives on health. 
     
    Your actions have to be ethical no matter what your environment is. You wouldn't just go in just any Toronto hospital and start helping out surgeons, because you know you would be endangering patients with your lack of knowledge and competency. Then why take the risk elsewhere? Are their lives less important? I'm pretty sure no one is thinking that while volunteering abroad, but that is the underlying message I perceive unfortunately.
     
    And even if you just stand there and watch. You're telling me a patient may have to sit through one of the worst moments of his life, where he'll feel the most vulnerable and scared... being observed by a group of kids who probably won't understand much more of what is happening than him? All of that just so they can write in their personal essay and gush in their interview of how this experience completely transformed them and opened their eyes on some medical realities in other parts of the world?
     
    I'm really sorry for how harsh this may sound, I really don't want to judge people doing it, but I find their actions careless and thoughtless nonetheless. 
     
    I remember in some of my internships at the hospital, where I would follow and observe a dietitian, I noticed how a couple of patients were at first uncomfortable by my presence. But they understood why I was there, they knew my presence was required so I could learn and become a RD myself. But why should patients in other countries suffer the presence of unexperienced students if it is not to form professionals that will help their own society?
     
    When I finished my dietetics/nutrition degree, some of my fellow classmates went to Benin to give nutrition classes to other health professionals there. The whole program was based on a long-lasting partnership between our two universities. It was overseen by a RD and they had classes/activities all year to learn the local culture and food customs. When I asked them for feedback on the experience thinking of doing something similar myself, they told me that they felt awkward most of the time because they were giving them advices and knowledge based on their experiences and studies in Canada, that did not really apply to the local realities. This taught me that with all the care we may take when trying to avoid a paternalist approach of humanitarian help, the risks are still present for us perpetuating neocolonialist stereotypes.
     
    And I believe in humanitarian help. I think international collaboration in health can be crucial, mostly when dealing with "acute health crisis" like what Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross are doing. But I also believe we have to thoroughly think our approach so it can be helpful, adapted and anchored in a perspective of knowledge transfer rather of than this sort of dominant-dominee relationship where one country is almighty with knowledge and resources, and the other just passively waiting to be helped.
     
    Many sociologues, doctors and other professionals are working on it. And I'm pretty sure premeds students paying 3k to shadow in the morning, sunbath in the afternoon, are not what they have in mind.
  8. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Qwer01 in Admission Médecine 2017   
    Juger de la difficulté d'un programme c'est selon moi complètement obsolète dû à la subjectivité que ça demande. On a tous une vision biaisée selon nos forces et faiblesses de ce qui peut être difficile ou non. Je connaissais une fille qui trouvait les examens de type QCM HYPER dur, et pour moi c'est le paradis. Par contre, avec les CRU on parle d'IFG+d'écart-type donc de la difficulté qu'un étudiant aura à se démarquer des gens de son programme, et non de difficulté du programme en soi.
     
    J'ai aussi envie de rajouter ma montée de lait au débat pour expliquer que je trouve que certains programmes ont cependant le désavantage d'avoir des stages notés en milieu clinique, qui pour plusieurs raisons rendent l'obtention d'une gpa compétitive vraiment plus difficile à mon avis. 
    Mais je vais arrêter ici, parce que comme l'a dit Psy2017 ça sert à rien ce genre de réflexion. On est tous et toutes stressé(e)s et on peut passer des heures à essayer de comprendre pourquoi moi, pourquoi pas l'autre; pourquoi l'autre, pourquoi pas moi.
     
    Et c'est compréhensible, c'est tellement frustrant appliquer en médecine, parce que quand tu te fais refuser ou mettre sur une liste d'attente, ça créée cette insécurité et ce doute de "est-ce que je suis assez bon(ne) pour être médecin?" Mais, il faut se rappeler:
    1. Qu'il y a une composante chance peu importe comment tu essayes de recruter.
    2. Qu'en fin de compte, le processus d'admission est imparfait et le sera toujours parce que c'est impossible de créer un algorithme parfait qui donne LA meilleure prédiction de qui sera un(e) bon(ne) médecin.
    3. Qu'à chaque année d'excellent(e)s candidat(e)s sont refusé(e)s, et ce avant même les entrevues, dans n'importe quelle université.
    4. Ça rajoute une expérience qui permet de construire notre résilience, notre persévérance et solidifier notre envie d'entrer en médecine. Les études qu'on fait en attendant de rentrer ne seront pas perdues, au contraire, elles finiront par influencer notre pratique, notre perception de la santé et ce qu'on considère comme étant des soins de qualité. 
     
    Si ça peut aider, je me rappelle avoir lu un article d'une mère d'un étudiant en médecine. Elle racontait son expérience à une journée porte ouverte (pas au Québec, si je me rappelle bien c'était en Ontario). Bref, il y avait un professeur en médecine qui siégeait sur les comités d'admission avec qui elle discutait qui lui avait dit qu'il y a grosso-modo 3 sortes de candidats. Ceux qui sont exceptionnellement bons (des génies avec des accomplissements incroyables), ceux qui sont simplement inadéquats (genre une gpa de 2,1) et finalement la très très très grande majorité d'étudiants très bons (gpa compétitive, recherche, extracurriculars, clinical experience, good to outstanding mmi/casper scores). Dans le troisième groupe, pas mal tous les étudiants feraient des bons médecins et les départager devient si difficile que le médecin avait dit "that we accept the first hundred or the second hundred, that wouldn't change much".
     
    Maintenant, c'est du ouï-dire certes, mais je pense que ça illustre bien quelque chose sur laquelle on peut pas mal tous s'entendre: un réfus en médecine n'illustre pas nécessairement ne pas avoir le potentiel d'être un bon médecin. L'essentiel, c'est d'avoir de l'autocritique et de voir les failles dans son dossier de candidature et essayer de s'améliorer sans perdre confiance en soi. 

    Voilà, c'était mon 2 cents pas forcément pertinent mais j'espère aidera certaines personnes qui, comme moi, sont entrain de stresser en attente de réponse, de déprimer et/ou qui sont juste en légère crise existentielle. Je vous comprends et je pense que justement le but de ce forum c'est de s'aider, se supporter et se conseiller à travers ça. Donc, respirez profondément et comme Psy2017 l'a dit, ne laissez pas un processus administratif déterminer la valeur que vous vous accordez. Et si jamais quelqu'un a envie de parler, n'hésiter à m'envoyer un message, ça me fera plaisir qu'on partage nos inquiétudes/espoirs.

    Bonne chance tout le monde!
  9. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Focused in Nutrition 2017   
    La première session est très théorique. Tu as des cours d'anatomie/physiologie avec ergo et physio, des cours de biochimie nutritionnelle (protéines, glucides, lipides), un cours de nutrition (les sources alimentaires pour chaque macronutriment et micronutritment), un laboratoire (qui est en fait un cours de cuisine avec des rapports à remettre) et un cours sur la science des aliments (la science derrière la levée du pain etc). 
     
    Ce sont des notions faciles à comprendre. Ce qui tue c'est surtout la quantité astronomique de détails qu'il faut apprendre. Mais ce sont des matières très amusantes et intuitives. Les premières semaines tu auras toujours faim en cours haha, c'est un fait que chaque étudiant(e) en nutrition apprend à gérer. Mais tu finis par t'habituer. 
     
    C'est plutôt réaliste de viser des A-A+ durant la première année et de viser un A-/A pour les laboratoires Mais il ne faut pas stresser les B+ occasionnels arrivent aussi. Les moyennes sont en général de A- (80-85%) ce qui est plutôt élevé, donc c'est du de se démarquer.
     
     
     
    Je peux que parler selon mon expérience, mais je trouve que le programme en nutrition est une bonne option si l'on veut changer de programme. Les cours sont faciles, mais il faut être très rigoureux parce que le volume de détail à apprendre est très présent. Par exemple, tu dois savoir que tel ou tel composé existe dans la banane et la pomme mais que tel ou tel composé existe dans la banane mais pas la pomme. Mais il y a environ une cinquantaine de composé et ça porte pas juste sur la pomme ou la banane, c'est sur tous les aliments. Bref, ça a ses défis, mais avec une bonne rigueur et une bonne tolérance au par coeur ça se fait super bien! 
     
    La première année en nutrition est vraiment parfaite pour augmenter sa gpa et réappliquer. Ça devient plus délicat en deuxième et troisième année avec des session de 6 semaines à 22 crédits. C'est encore faisable mais ce n'est plus "facile", mais les notions deviennent rapidement complexes parce qu'on rentre dans les détails et l'approche clinique, puis aussi on a plus de cours de gestion (ressources humaines, comptabilité, approvisionnement/production/distribution) ce qui peut être décourageant pour des étudiants qui sont uniquement motivé par le secteur de la santé. Aussi, après la première année il y a beaucoup de stage (1600 heures) et c'est presqu'impossible d'avoir des A et A+ en stage, donc ça complique les choses.
     
    La majorité 80% et + des examens sont QCM sinon il y en a peut-être 2 ou 3 qui sont à réponses courtes et il y a des travaux écrits à remettre (surtout des rapports de laboratoires pour les cours de cuisines où tu dois expliquer la science derrière les plats que tu cuisines. Par exemple pourquoi un pain devient plus friable si on enlève l'oeuf.) C'est en soit pas exigeant, tu fais juste recracher dans le rapport ce que tu as vu en cours avec la professeure. Puis les laboratoires sont vraiment amusant. On est en équipe de deux et on a chacun notre petite cuisine avec un four, etc. Par session de lab vous êtes 12 équipes et chaque semaine a un thème (les pains, les fruits, les gâteaux, la viande). Chaque équipe a sa propre recette qui teste un concept scientifique différent de la catégorie alimentaire étudiée. Et à la fin on déguste toutes les recettes et on en discute ensemble. C'est vraiment un cours intéressant!
     
    Si tu as fais sciences biomed tu devrais déjà avoir une certaine rigueur d'études pour gérer des cours universitaires qui demande du parcoeurisme. Sois hyper motivé(e), diligent et révise tes cours au fur et à mesure, tes chances seront bonnes selon moi! Mais avec la nutrition, c'est vraiment important d'aimer ce qu'on étudie sinon on décroche rapidement.
     
    J'ai personnellement eu une très bonne expérience globale. J'ai finis mon bac à l'udem cette année en décembre parce que c'est 3 ans et demi et j'ai été très impliqué avec la direction et l'association. Donc si vous avez des question n'hésitez-pas, ça me fera très plaisir!
  10. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Pharmed2008 in Nutrition 2017   
    Ça sera avec plaisir que je te renseignerais, je crois les doigts pour toi! 
  11. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from abouttimeijoined in Mcat Preparation- Where To Start   
    Hey! 
     
    I think preparing 3 to 6 months before is a good plan (less mean you may not be prepared enough, more increases your risks of burning out). Usually, if you go for 6 months it's because you have to study/work at the same time and need to even out your studying. I went with a prep company because when I started I had never heard of the mcat before and having done all my courses in french I wanted something structured and teachers I could ask questions to. But, prep classes aren't a must and they have become really expensive since I did mine. You have to see with yourself if you feel it is that important to you. 
     
    So here how my study went: 
     
    1. Reading with Exam Kracker
    I like that they explain really well every concept and they have lots of schemas and pictures. Since I am visual this was really helpful. I tried reading with TPR but I didn't like it as much, I found it to be too condensed and the lack of schemas/pictures made the reading harder. Also what I loved with EK is how they give a lot of advices and even funny little jokes that can help remember some things or just make your studying lighter.
     
    2. I went to Khan Academy for notions I didn't understand when reading Ek. It's really well vulgarized, very visual and they have a good structure and sequence of notions so it is easier to assimilate. Also, I used Khan Academy for psy&socio because they cover it more in dept and while practicing I found many concepts that were absent in prep books were well covered in KA. I also did all the questions with Khan Academy for psy but not the other sections. I do suggest you do everything they offer for psy and touch the other sections (bio, chem, physics, cars) only if you find yourself struggling. 
     
    3. I did Next Step Mcat full length tests. The key to succeeding the Mcat is practicing it. It's not just a science exam so knowing your stuff will only help you get 50% of the answers. You need to develop strategies to really become comfortable reading passages, questions and answers and being really efficient at not falling into traps and carefully but rapidly selecting an answer. This requires you practice as much as possible. I suggest at least 1 test a week, from the beginning of your studies and maybe 2-3 tests a week (3-2 weeks before your Mcat, but don't do any the week before you mcat to not tire yourself out). I loved Next Step's most because having done the Mcat 2 times, I found their tests were the most accurate to the Mcat. Their science sections can sometimes be slightly harder than the mcat, but it makes really good practice. They have 10 tests and I suggest you do them all. If you finished those, I would then suggest EK, TPR or Kaplan without preference. Try to do one of each because they all have advantages and disadvantages, so by diversifying your means of study your increase your chances of being better prepared for the mcat. The last test(s) you will do, must be from AAMC (the company that does the real Mcat) though.
     
    4. After practicing an exam I would carefully review my mistakes and narrow down the subjects I struggled most with. I would note them and then either go on Khan Academy and practice with some questions or use AAMC's questions bank. I would also make memory cards if I noticed I kept making a mistake because of something I forgot like physics equations or amino acids structures. 
     
    I studied approximately 4 months (16 weeks) for my mcat, following this schedule:
     
    Weeks 1-11
     
    Reading Days (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) :
    8 AM - 12PM : Reading a chapter in EK twice (one very quickly just skimming content + one attentive reading). Try to avoid highlighting or making too much notes as it can be a waste of time. I used to mostly write ideas of how I would like to sum up the content I was reading in my future resumes. Example I make a note to resume the 3 pages on personality theories in one table or resume the 5 pages of proteins' metabolic pathways in one schema. Then I would do quick exercices (In class exams in EK that are 30 minutes top. Don't forget to carefully review where you made mistakes and brainstorm ideas on how to avoid them in the future.) Go to Khan Academy for further explanations if some concepts are still foggy after reading.
    1PM - 4PM: same thing as this morning but with a second chapter.
    5PM - 8PM: I started doing my resumes for the chapters seen.
     
    Note: I took more time with Psychology&Sociology because I resumed Khan Academy's videos too.
     
    Review Day (Thursday):
    8 AM-8PM: I would finish all the resumes of the chapters read this week. For some subjects I knew I was weak in (#physics) I did exercices with AAMC's question banks and/or Khan Academy practice questions.
     
    Rest Day (Friday): 
    So important to allow yourself a day where you can completely unplug from everything mcat related. Keeps you away from burning out.
     
    Test Day (Saturday):
    8AM-4PM: Full length Mcat simulation. First 2 weeks dont time yourself. Just take as much time as needed to complete them. It helps you focus on familiarizing with the test, its format, the way the passages are written, how answers are formulated. After, you have to always time yourself to work on your stamina and time management. After a full length exam, I suggest you rest or go for a walk outside, meet some friends. Well, just unwind, they are quite tiring.
     
    Practice Day (Sunday):
    8AM-12PM: Review all your answers. Reread the passages. Examine carefully the correction: why your answer was right or wrong. Why the others answers were wrong/right. I suggest you take a notebook and for each passage for each section of every practice exam you did, you note 2 strengths and 2 weakness. At the end of all section give yourself one objective/strategy for the other practice exam. DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP. You can't improve yourself to reach a high score if you don't know what you need to change in your approach or what you need to study/practice more.
    1PM-3PM: Practice the worst section (section you had the lowest score). Make notes, memory cards, practice questions with Khan Academy or AAMC's questions bank.
    3:30PM-5:30PM: Same with second worst section.
    6PM-8PM: Same with second best. (this one is optional if you feel you need more time with the other two because you significantly performed less or if you just need time to rest).
    *** The first two weeks you may skip the afternoon period of practice day and use two days to just complete the Mcat test and review it.
     
    As you can see I did not work while studying for the Mcat because I wanted to be a 100% in. But if you do, reorganize your schedule but be sure to still leave sufficient time for Mcat test simulations (priority #1) & for rest time (or else you'll burn yourself out). Be more efficient in other parts of your studies: dont spend too much time reading mostly if you spend half of it highlighting. Cut down time on resumes by only writting about stuff you always forget or have a hard time understanding. If you majored in biochem, maybe the krebs cycle is not something you need notes on.
     
    Weeks 12-15:
    By this time I had completed my readings and notes so basically I did Test day>Practice Day>Rest Day successively until the week before the exam. Your last exam should has to be an AAMC one. Be careful to not put too much pressure on you. If you feel you need more rest time, take it, as long as you continue to practice tests at least 1 per week. 
     
    Week 16:
    Probably the hardest for premeds, but do nothing. Rest. Review leisurely some notes or memory cards by the pool or in a park or sipping your favourite summer beverage on a terrasse. Prepare for the other parts of the Mcat:
    Have a consistent sleeping pattern and get used at waking up at a the hour you'll have to wake up on your Mcat day. Prepare your outfit (something comfortable that is neither too hot or cold. Preferably without pockets so they take less time to search you before your enter your exam class). Prepare your stuff (passport, locker, money just in case, other identity cards) Prepare your lunch (avoid things that are too spicy or bloating. Go with fresh and light things that can still be fulfilling like a salad. Be sure you pack enough proteins. Add yourself a treat like your favourite chocolate bar. It helps as a boost in the afternoon.) Go check the area where you'll take your exam. How much time it took you to get there. Is there a parking near?  Finally, keeping good lifestyle habits from week 1 is essential when looking to succeed on the Mcat.
    Don't sleep too late and avoid sleepless nights. Maintain an active lifestyle. No need to be fancy here. Walking 30 minutes a day, doing some yoga streches in the morning or even using app like blogilates or aaptiv can help squeeze in a 10 minutes mini-work out in a day. This helped me a lot in keeping me focused, motivated and energetic.  Maintain a social life and have a good support group (friends, family, fellow mcat test takers you study with). It's important to not isolate yourself cause this may lead to anxiety, depression and burning out. Keep your environment clean. Sleep in a clean room, study in an clean environment. This helps clear the head. It made me feel in control when I didn't let the mcat take control over my cleaning schedule. And it's just better for the moral and the motivation when your things are in order, in my opinion. Good eating habits are key. Summer is coming with all its fresh produce, farm markets are going to be there and prices tend to be lower for fresh and less transformed foods. Avoid red bulls and too much frappucinos or other highly transformed food. They cause sugar rushes, makes you feel sleepy/tired, may cause headaches, unbalance the dopamine levels and may lead to weight gain which can be demoralizing.  Overall, this is an ideal plan. Even I deviated some times. It's ok, just rearrange your schedule so it can fit your new circumstances. Don't let stress get to you. Trust yourself and be confident. The Mcat is hard, but believe you can beat it.
    With that said, good luck! And if you have any questions, PM me!
  12. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Clapton in Would You Pursue Your Med Dream If The Salary..   
    I would without hesitation. I think it's very important to recognize how doctors' high salary are becoming a challenge in establishing trust with the population and soon with patients and other health professionals. We can justify an above-average salary (around 100k) with the arguments raised above, but not that high a salary. Human beings are greedy in nature, it's normal, but it's not acceptable when it starts preventing us from delivering quality care that is as accessible as possible. 
    The salary doctors defend right now cause our whole health system to be held hostage to the high fees we demand. I'm down anytime to see our paychecks cut in half so we can hire more doctors, other health professionals, improve our infrastructures and start having health prevention&promotion policies that finally have some meat in them. I would gladly drop the "self-employed" status, let them handle the retirement savings etc. and have a much lower salary. I'm in it for the hourly rate salary if it means I get to spend the time it takes with my patients. 
    I would prefer anytime to be in the middle income bracket but wake up knowing I get to work in an environment that makes it easier and feasible for me to truly help my patients that require lots of follow-ups and longer consultation to finally target that behaviour change they need to not end up in the emergency with clogged up arteries and glycemia through the roof in a decade; to not have to enter a room and know that for 8 minutes I will probably give half-a**ed advices to an overwhelmed patient that probably wont have the motivation I should have helped him get to apply those changes. And not having to head to a sinking health system and try to patch it up with glue and paper.
    Even though I can respect the idea that for some the salary is a very important component of the profession and that it is justified by the length of the program, the academic costs (which aren't high in Quebec, so I cant speak on this one) & de liability. But on a practical and ethical point of vue the idea of maintaining our salaries that high doesn't add up. And I tried to debate it the other way around, but it just doesn't hold up with our own deontology, not if the patient's wellbeing is our number one, sinequanone priority. 
  13. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to InstantRamen in 2 in 1 Laptop   
    Perhaps this is excessive, but I really like to use the iPad Pro and a computer. Having two devices is nice! I understand that this may be a bit overkill, but I would take the plunge if it makes learning easier. Med school is fast, so I appreciated the convenience and the ease of being able to sync OneNote!
  14. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from medmayo in Nutritionniste avec parcours atypique - programme MD   
    Oui, ça a de la valeur. Mais déjà les universités francophones, il n'y a pas de CV ou d'essai personnel, alors bien que ton parcours est fort intéressant, ce n'est pas quelque chose qui sera considéré dans ton dossier à la première étape de sélection pour te rendre aux entrevues. À McGill et Ottawa, ton CV et tes expériences personnelles sont considéré dans le premier tour de sélection.
    Aussi, je ne veux pas dévaloriser la richesse de ton parcours, mais dans les universités francophones, une bonne partie des candidats dans ton bassin d'appliquants (universitaires) ont eux aussi de l'expérience clinique, avec des patients, dans un milieu hospitalier. Dans les universités anglo et franco, la quasi-totalité des candidats ont eu de l'expérience avec des patients que cela soit sous forme de shadowing, de bénévolat, de voyage humanitaire ou de recherche. Bien évidemment ton expérience semble plus riche en profondeur et en termes d'autonomie et d'"accountability", donc c'est clairement un avantage, mais ce n'est malheureusement pas suffisant pour te rendre compétitive. 
    C'est important de se rappeler que ce n'est pas ton vécu en soi qui t'avantage, mais la perspective que ce vécu a créé en toi qui t'aidera à te démarquer. C'est à dire que simplement voir dans ton CV que tu es nutritionniste pour MSF n'affectera que légèrement la qualité de ton application. C'est la maturité, les valeurs humaines que tu feras ressortir dans ta candidature (essais personnels, entrevue, CASPer, CV, etc) en les justifiant par tes expériences qui te permettront de te démarquer. Une personne qui travaille chez McDo peut s'avérer être beaucoup plus compétitive qu'une personne avec un post-doc en immunologie parce que dans sa candidature, l'introspection qu'elle a fait de son parcours est plus riche en qualités humaines désirées en médecine. 
    Bref, pour répondre à ta question de si ça rajoute de la valeur: ça rajoute la valeur que tu lui donnes. Utilise ton expérience de manière adéquate, ne l'imagine pas comme une carte privilège du monopoly mais tisse la subtilement et habilement dans la construction du caractère que tu présentes à ceux qui évalueront ta candidature. 
    Bonne chance et bon succès dans tes démarches!
     
  15. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from DentalFoodie in Would You Pursue Your Med Dream If The Salary..   
    I would without hesitation. I think it's very important to recognize how doctors' high salary are becoming a challenge in establishing trust with the population and soon with patients and other health professionals. We can justify an above-average salary (around 100k) with the arguments raised above, but not that high a salary. Human beings are greedy in nature, it's normal, but it's not acceptable when it starts preventing us from delivering quality care that is as accessible as possible. 
    The salary doctors defend right now cause our whole health system to be held hostage to the high fees we demand. I'm down anytime to see our paychecks cut in half so we can hire more doctors, other health professionals, improve our infrastructures and start having health prevention&promotion policies that finally have some meat in them. I would gladly drop the "self-employed" status, let them handle the retirement savings etc. and have a much lower salary. I'm in it for the hourly rate salary if it means I get to spend the time it takes with my patients. 
    I would prefer anytime to be in the middle income bracket but wake up knowing I get to work in an environment that makes it easier and feasible for me to truly help my patients that require lots of follow-ups and longer consultation to finally target that behaviour change they need to not end up in the emergency with clogged up arteries and glycemia through the roof in a decade; to not have to enter a room and know that for 8 minutes I will probably give half-a**ed advices to an overwhelmed patient that probably wont have the motivation I should have helped him get to apply those changes. And not having to head to a sinking health system and try to patch it up with glue and paper.
    Even though I can respect the idea that for some the salary is a very important component of the profession and that it is justified by the length of the program, the academic costs (which aren't high in Quebec, so I cant speak on this one) & de liability. But on a practical and ethical point of vue the idea of maintaining our salaries that high doesn't add up. And I tried to debate it the other way around, but it just doesn't hold up with our own deontology, not if the patient's wellbeing is our number one, sinequanone priority. 
  16. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Clapton in Nutritionniste avec parcours atypique - programme MD   
    Oui, ça a de la valeur. Mais déjà les universités francophones, il n'y a pas de CV ou d'essai personnel, alors bien que ton parcours est fort intéressant, ce n'est pas quelque chose qui sera considéré dans ton dossier à la première étape de sélection pour te rendre aux entrevues. À McGill et Ottawa, ton CV et tes expériences personnelles sont considéré dans le premier tour de sélection.
    Aussi, je ne veux pas dévaloriser la richesse de ton parcours, mais dans les universités francophones, une bonne partie des candidats dans ton bassin d'appliquants (universitaires) ont eux aussi de l'expérience clinique, avec des patients, dans un milieu hospitalier. Dans les universités anglo et franco, la quasi-totalité des candidats ont eu de l'expérience avec des patients que cela soit sous forme de shadowing, de bénévolat, de voyage humanitaire ou de recherche. Bien évidemment ton expérience semble plus riche en profondeur et en termes d'autonomie et d'"accountability", donc c'est clairement un avantage, mais ce n'est malheureusement pas suffisant pour te rendre compétitive. 
    C'est important de se rappeler que ce n'est pas ton vécu en soi qui t'avantage, mais la perspective que ce vécu a créé en toi qui t'aidera à te démarquer. C'est à dire que simplement voir dans ton CV que tu es nutritionniste pour MSF n'affectera que légèrement la qualité de ton application. C'est la maturité, les valeurs humaines que tu feras ressortir dans ta candidature (essais personnels, entrevue, CASPer, CV, etc) en les justifiant par tes expériences qui te permettront de te démarquer. Une personne qui travaille chez McDo peut s'avérer être beaucoup plus compétitive qu'une personne avec un post-doc en immunologie parce que dans sa candidature, l'introspection qu'elle a fait de son parcours est plus riche en qualités humaines désirées en médecine. 
    Bref, pour répondre à ta question de si ça rajoute de la valeur: ça rajoute la valeur que tu lui donnes. Utilise ton expérience de manière adéquate, ne l'imagine pas comme une carte privilège du monopoly mais tisse la subtilement et habilement dans la construction du caractère que tu présentes à ceux qui évalueront ta candidature. 
    Bonne chance et bon succès dans tes démarches!
     
  17. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from dumbebell in Would You Pursue Your Med Dream If The Salary..   
    I would without hesitation. I think it's very important to recognize how doctors' high salary are becoming a challenge in establishing trust with the population and soon with patients and other health professionals. We can justify an above-average salary (around 100k) with the arguments raised above, but not that high a salary. Human beings are greedy in nature, it's normal, but it's not acceptable when it starts preventing us from delivering quality care that is as accessible as possible. 
    The salary doctors defend right now cause our whole health system to be held hostage to the high fees we demand. I'm down anytime to see our paychecks cut in half so we can hire more doctors, other health professionals, improve our infrastructures and start having health prevention&promotion policies that finally have some meat in them. I would gladly drop the "self-employed" status, let them handle the retirement savings etc. and have a much lower salary. I'm in it for the hourly rate salary if it means I get to spend the time it takes with my patients. 
    I would prefer anytime to be in the middle income bracket but wake up knowing I get to work in an environment that makes it easier and feasible for me to truly help my patients that require lots of follow-ups and longer consultation to finally target that behaviour change they need to not end up in the emergency with clogged up arteries and glycemia through the roof in a decade; to not have to enter a room and know that for 8 minutes I will probably give half-a**ed advices to an overwhelmed patient that probably wont have the motivation I should have helped him get to apply those changes. And not having to head to a sinking health system and try to patch it up with glue and paper.
    Even though I can respect the idea that for some the salary is a very important component of the profession and that it is justified by the length of the program, the academic costs (which aren't high in Quebec, so I cant speak on this one) & de liability. But on a practical and ethical point of vue the idea of maintaining our salaries that high doesn't add up. And I tried to debate it the other way around, but it just doesn't hold up with our own deontology, not if the patient's wellbeing is our number one, sinequanone priority. 
  18. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Clapton in Signature as a medical student   
    Why would you use "MD Candidate" ?
    If you have to write something to someone related to the field or faculty staffs, just write in the email that you are a medical student.
    If you have to write something unrelated to your professional life, write your name, that's all. Nobody likes a show off.
  19. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Clapton in Would You Pursue Your Med Dream If The Salary..   
    MD= 4 y + 2-6 y (FM or speciality)
    Regular Ph.D road = 4 y(B.Sc) + 2 y (Master) + 4-7 yrs (Research/clinical Ph.D) 
    MD = 220-350k+ 
    Regular Ph.D = around 85-95k
    The reason = numbers highly regulated by the government while having a lot of the peaks of solo practitioner.
    If there was a real free-market = way more MDs, more competition, the average pay would be way lower and the population would be better served... IMO. 
    And I'm almost certain that even if the average salary of a physician was cut by 30%, all the seats in Med school would still be taken. 
     

     
     
  20. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Intrepid86 in How much sleep do you get?   
    Sleep is for wimps and dermatologists.
  21. Like
    HalfBaked got a reaction from Clapton in How do you stay organize?   
    I use iStudiez Pro. Except for the name it's a great app, mostly as a premed since you can enter your notes and it automatically calculates your gpa. I liked having that option. I used it to keep track of anything school-related. Assignments, due dates, exams with time/location, classes and the subjects in the classes, teachers' contact information, group projects, etc. They sync on mac&iphone and also with google calenders. I keep my physical planner and rewrite assignment/exams briefly, write my daily/weekly to-do lists and appointments. I usually take a few hours at the beginning of the semester with the course outline to enter everything so I don't have to worry about it for the next 16 weeks and update it when necessary. 
  22. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Bambi in Need advice (please)   
    Your age is not relevant to any decision you make. It is merely a number. You will still have over three decades of practice. Go for it, try your best and see what happens. Your fallback is dentistry. We are talking here about the remainder of your life and it is important that you live life with no regrets. I wish you success in achieving your goal.
  23. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Clapton in Female advice needed, thank you   
    Just ask for her number and keep your cool. If she doesn't want to go out with you, act like if it doesn't matter (even if your dying inside).

  24. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to SoraAde in Female advice needed, thank you   
    Find a place where you're not going to be interrupted by other people, then start small talk etc, show you're interested.. then when the silence hits, tell her you have a 4.0 GPA and 132 CARS. She'll ask you for your number
  25. Like
    HalfBaked reacted to Clapton in Marge de crédit et Prêt et bourses   
    Elle fait de la clinique (environ 40-45h semaine) et 1 semaine d'hospitalisation par mois environ.
    Je sais qu'elle doit payer environ 30%-32% de ses actes pour les frais de cabinet. Ensuite, il y a l'assurance professionnelle, le permis de pratique, la formation continue et les frais qui sont normalement payé par un employeur (devoir payer 100% des REER et assurances au lieu de 40-50% comme les employés). Donc oui, elle fait probablement du 250k+ par année, mais une fois tout ça pris en compte, on parle probablement plus d'un salaire dans les 150k-160k quand elle va être à son rythme optimal (en salaire équivalent à un salarié, donc moins toutes les dépenses normalement payées par l'employeur).
    Ses revenus vont sûrement augmenter un peu avec le temps, mais mon point c'était juste de démontrer que les médecins/dentistes/pharmaciens etc vivent bien, mais pas sur l'or pour autant. Genre un radiologiste qui a un revenu de 700k par année, il va probablement payer un 250-300k pour les frais d'utilisation des machines, et ensuite il y a toutes les dépenses annexes de travailleur autonome auxquels on ne pense pas réellement. Et ensuite, il faut regarder le salaire horaire, car oui certaines spécialités ont une moyenne salariale dans les 400k, mais c'est pour combien d'heures en moyenne ? 50-60h semaine ?
    Il y a moyen de sauver de l'impôt (incorporation/fiducie), mais avec le nouveau gouvernement c'est moins lucratif qu'avant. Et oui, ça peut paraître simple de se dire qu'on va se payer un salaire de 150k et mettre un 200k dans un compte dont on paie seulement 25% d'impôts, cependant quand tu es jeune, tu veux avoir de l'argent accessible (pour payer ta maison, avoir du luxe, voyager, etc). C'est bien beau mettre 200k dans un compte d'entreprise et d'investir son argent, mais ça reste que ça peut demander un 15-20 ans pour vraiment pouvoir en bénéficier... (quand tu sors ton argent de compte d'entreprise, tu vas être imposé à presque 50%, donc l'avantage c'est surtout dans un but d'investir sur une somme considérable et donc de faire fructuer ton argent plus rapidement).
    Bref, c'est certain qu'un professionnel de la santé va bien vivre et faire un excellent salaire. Cependant, il faut comprendre que souvent les gros chiffres salariales qu'on voit peuvent être trompeurs. C'est la même chose pour les dentistes. Si on regarde le salaire brut d'un dentiste, on peut toucher les 250-300k par année en facturation (comme associé). Cependant une fois qu'on enlève tous les frais liés au travail autonome, et qu'on enlève les frais de bureau/gestion, on se retrouve avec un salaire très convenable, mais loin du chiffre "d'affiche". 
    Si tu veux un conseil, ne stress pas trop avec ta dette car effectivement, ça va très bien se repayer plus tard. Cependant, essaie tout de même de faire attention et de garder ta dette sous contrôle. Essaie d'éviter au maximum l'endettement inutile. Ça veut pas dire de se priver, ça veut juste dire de vivre selon ses moyens et de pas se payer un voyage de 2000$ à chaque année et vivre dans un condo neuf avec un loyé de 1700$ par mois en se disant: "C'est pas grave finir avec 200 000$ de dettes, je vais être médecin/dentiste/pharmacien, etc".
    Et aussi, il est jamais trop tard pour commencer à planifier tes finances ! Essaie de lire des trucs sur les REER, les investissement, les budgets, l'inflation, etc. C'est le genre de trucs qui vont grandement te servir quand tu vas être diplômé et que tu vas devoir commencer à rembourser tes dettes et investir ton argent intelligemment. Tu peux aussi profiter de diverses conférences données par la faculté pour commencer à te faire une idée de tout ça. Sinon, il y a des conseillers financiers spécialisés pour nos professions.
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