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Hellothere77

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Hellothere77 last won the day on June 19

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About Hellothere77

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  1. I would go to the school that's furthest from your parents so you can avoid not becoming an adult before med school that way.
  2. Anesthesia is very procedural, you have to intubate and do epidurals/blocks while impatient surgeons "joke" about how long you're taking.
  3. I didn't follow that hypothetical at all, but Med-P and IP are completely separate streams. One waitlist has no effect on the other, and no candidate can apply to both.
  4. Wait are you admitting that you failed to ask that? You monster
  5. You want to be the one pediatrician who spends half the time with their patients that everyone else does? They're not "less efficient" because all pediatricians just happen to love chatting at the water cooler, it's the nature of peds. If you're zooming in and out you're doing a lousy job. Parents need a lot of advice and reassurance and if you don't give it to them because you're trying to fit in more patients than every other pediatrician then you're not efficient, you're a bad doctor.
  6. They gave exemptions 3 years ago but then stopped. I haven't heard anything about them re-instituting exemptions, even though they definitely should since it's a silly waste of time for anyone with previous research experience.
  7. Pretty simple, being a jerk and/or not getting along with your interviewers or the team if you did an elective there. Remember they're choosing new residents they're going to spend 2-5 years with and possibly more. If they have two similar applicants, they'll go with the one they got along with and have an easy time talking to. Without trying to sound too corny, there's not much you can do about that just be yourself (your professional self). If you try to hard to come off a particular way it might have the opposite effect, don't be scared to show your personality.
  8. Yes absolutely. Everything I said is for med students. Some staff might not have the most fluent French, but if you're working in Montreal you have to be able to speak French. The hospital being English just means all charting is in English and if you call someone for a consult you'll be speaking in English, but the patients are the patients. You speak whatever language they're most comfortable with as a staff, and as I said if you're working in Montreal you have to be comfortable with both. When you're in the hospital staff are understanding, and if you didn't catch what they were talking about with the patient because it was in French they'll be happy to clarify afterward. I've encountered some staff in clinics outside the hospital that have been unimpressed with me not being completely fluent in French, but hey some staff are just chronically unimpressed with everyone, you get used to it in clerkship.
  9. 1) I don't have the stats (not sure if anyone does) but there are plenty of people in the class who don't speak French. Many grew up elsewhere but were born in Montreal so they have in-province status, and a bunch from the west island barely speak any. For LFME they ask you if you can speak French and try to accommodate. It's not a guarantee, but most staff will be understanding especially as a Med1, and won't give you French patients. Also keep in mind a lot of French-speakers also speak English. For some people LFME also ends up just being shadowing, it really depends on who you're placed with. You will not need to chart in French ever. If you can have a rudimentary conversation while using Google translate for the words you forget you'll be fine. The only time anyone charts in French is for optional placements like rural family sites, which again if you state you can't read/write in French you won't be sent there. McGill hospitals are English-based. There are a couple of exceptions for clinics, or OB in Lasalle (only a few students in the class end up placed there), but every other hospital-based rotation is in an English hospital. But yes it's Montreal, so you can expect roughly half of your patients to be French speaking. I won't lie, it's more stressful if you're not comfortable in French, but it's also very doable. 2) No 3) There are no streets I particularly recommend (downtown Montreal isn't dangerous), but keep in mind you'll spend most of your time for 1.5 years at McIntyre on the McGill campus, and after that you'll be at various hospitals. A lot of people in the class moved before Med3 to be close to whichever hospital they spend the most time at, especially for the 4 months of Internal/Surgery which has the toughest hours. Those who lived a long commute away ended up getting an airbnb downtown for their gensurg rotation (gotta be in the hospital ready to round by 6am ). You won't find that out until spring of Med2 though.
  10. No, you just accept and pay the small deposit, then if you get into an Ontario school you can accept that and withdraw your acceptance from McGill (losing $50 or whatever... and then losing another 50k cause you passed on Quebec IP tuition ).
  11. Canadian applicants are evaluated very objectively, your wGPA is calculated however that University calculates it, and no one is judging how you got there. If you get an interview it's possible they might ask about what you studied and when (in your case I doubt it, it doesn't look that unusual) but even then you can always find a way to spin it, like if you switched majors and wanted to explore something else. Could even be a good thing if you're not completely cookie-cutter and have a story as to why.
  12. They're pretty transparent in saying that what you're evaluated on might not be what you expect or what you would think by reading the prompt. If the scenario ends up taking you in a different direction than what you thought the "task" should be, then it was probably designed that way. Don't overthink it, no one here can guarantee you did or did not do well on the station.
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