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Hellothere77

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  1. introduction to psychology requires no introduction
  2. Hellothere77

    Unhappy in medicine?

    Do electives in the oddballs... psych, public health, pathology, etc. Hating working on wards/OR doesn't mean hating all of medicine. The rotations you've done so far all have similar work environments.
  3. Hellothere77

    Trent is literally scamming parents

    It's a small school that doesn't attract many students who want medicine, so it's not surprising that few are accepted, that part isn't fishy. Also there's nothing wrong with a small school trying to promote a pre-med stream, and some aspects of this program are great like their hospital placements. It's not easy to get shadowing experience in hospitals in Canada as a pre-med. It's a shame that they're promoting SGU though. That portion is presented separately but in parallel with the "medical professional stream" and "premedical option" on their website. They imply that you can come back to Canada for residency as though that's something Trent can arrange. I enjoyed this part especially, anesthesia represent boiii Career Paths Doctor; Veterinarian; Surgeon; Anesthesiologist; Policy Advisor; Medical Researcher; General Practitioner; Professor
  4. Do you have a link to these data? When I tried to find something more specific than the superficial breakdown I linked I wasn't able to, I'd be very interested to check that out for other specialties as well
  5. https://www.cma.ca/En/Pages/specialty-profiles.aspx 2015/2016 average gross for psychiatry was 260k, for Internal (including sub-specialties) 400k, for peds 300k, all similar overheads Based on that the reputation is understandable, especially when the training is 2.5x longer than FM
  6. Hellothere77

    Website to check your chances for each school

    I don't think so. For American pre-meds knowing your chances at particular schools is important because you have to select which ones to apply to, whereas in Canada you just apply to any/all that you can. The only thing that would be useful is a chart of matriculation data, just to see what the mean and minimum accepted GPAs/MCATs are (I think I've seen something like this before). Same goes for interviews, but I'm not sure if schools release those data. It would be pretty meaningless to know that your chances are 40% at UofT and 60% at Mac (even if you could do this accurately which I doubt because the process is too random), because anyone applying to Ontario schools will apply to both and hope for the best anyway. So basically I don't think what you're describing is possible, and if it was somehow possible I don't think it would be helpful at all. It would just be a weird obsessive neurosis-producing tool for pre-meds to use masochistically.
  7. Hellothere77

    Climate in Diagnostic Radiology

    I'd never seen anyone advocate so passionately for the virtue of money and prestige. Well done, it would be such a tragedy if they took a back burner in anyone's life
  8. Hellothere77

    MD Financial 2018 Backpacks?

    Ha, good sleuthing.That'd be really weird though... they go with teal, blue, then green for 3 years?
  9. Hellothere77

    MD Financial 2018 Backpacks?

    Just to be clear, it lets everyone in medicine know that you're a med student. If you're not in med and don't work in a hospital, no one around town will know what it means. There's no patch that says "I'M IN MEDICAL SCHOOL PLEASE BE IMPRESSED WITH ME", and no one is going to see a tiny MD Financial label and know what that means. People buy shirts that say "U of T Medicine" on them to do that, the backpacks are just free, good quality, and are an easy way for someone in med to know what year you're in.
  10. Hellothere77

    UofT vs McGIll

    Nah opposite point, I'm at McGill and my french is terrible. Lord save me...
  11. Hellothere77

    UofT vs McGIll

    Huh? What that Spanish? Anyway, if you can get a few sentences out on the fly you're already in a good place. Even some of the anglophones from Quebec have very iffy french, or just haven't used it in a long time. You should be fine, enjoy Montreal!
  12. Hellothere77

    UofT vs McGIll

    Glad that you made your decision, but for anyone else reading there's one other important point to highlight. Although you may think you're certain what residency you want, many many many people change their minds during med school. So yes everything mentioned in this thread is true, but if you change your mind then that entire factor is moot. In my view consideration of what city you'd be happiest in can be even more important. If you're enjoying your life you'll have an easier time, potentially making it easier to make connections, explore different specialties and even get better evals if you happier in general. Also especially for someone who is uncertain about their french skills, give some thought to whether dealing with french patients would be a large source of stress. I'm not saying it's a reason to avoid McGill entirely, but if the idea of communicating with french patients fills you with dread, it's something to think about. If you genuinely want to improve your french along the way it could also be a positive!
  13. Hellothere77

    How to compare med schools in Canada

    The more elective time the better. Both for the sake of competitiveness and for having enough time to explore and find the right fit. I'm sure people from shorter programs will argue that they match well in competitive specialties, but that doesn't account for some people who may have discovered they enjoy a competitive specialty but didn't bother going for it because it was too late to find enough electives to have a chance. With more elective time over a longer period, you have a bigger window to change your path. Clerkship really isn't something you want to rush through, you're deciding what you want to do for the rest of your life. Personally I'd prioritize elective time (especially pre-CARMS electives) over most other things.
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